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Can You Help? Routing Through a Hub

Last response: in Wireless Networking
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December 24, 2004 5:53:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I have a Compaq 2404 WBR 802.11b wireless router.

Current configuration
==========================================
I have a cable modem and a maximum of 2 dhcp client addressess allowed from
my cable ISP. I have 4 computers, only 1 of which has a wireless adaptor.
I don't have enough addresses.

Currently, 2 computers are being passed dhcp addresses from the ISP. The
wireless router is not yet configured but when it is, it will also need a
dhcp address. However, if I can configure it correctly, it will be the only
device receiving a dhcp client address.

The cable modem is attached to a hub. The hub is attached to the wbr at one
of the 3 non-WAN ports on the wbr (I assume the wbr is hardwired such that
the WAN port needs to separately connected to the cable modem, but I haven't
done that yet
-- due to distance from the cable modem I was hoping to be able to route
without using that WAN port).

Problem
==========================================
When I turn on dhcp at the wbr it never routes to/from any of the wired
computers out to the Internet. However, it does -- in testing -- route a
wireless computer to the Internet.

What I want
==========================================
I want to receive DHCP addresses on my wired network, from the wbr. I
assume I'll have to give the wbr 1 address from the ISP. I'd like the
remainder of the addresses -- for 4 computers -- to come from the wbr. How
do I get the wbr to route wired computers to the Internet?

Any suggestions to accomplish my goal?

More about : routing hub

Anonymous
December 25, 2004 1:45:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:53:15 -0600, in alt.internet.wireless , "Rick"
<badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:

>I have a Compaq 2404 WBR 802.11b wireless router.

why not just connect the above router directly to your cable modem, turn on
DHCP, configure all your clients to get addresses from it. You can
generally run a long length of CAT5 from the modem to the router without
any problems.

>Currently, 2 computers are being passed dhcp addresses from the ISP. The
>wireless router is not yet configured but when it is, it will also need a
>dhcp address. However, if I can configure it correctly, it will be the only
>device receiving a dhcp client address.

Yes.

>The cable modem is attached to a hub. The hub is attached to the wbr at one
>of the 3 non-WAN ports on the wbr

This just won't work. The router expects the modem to be on the WAN port,
and will try to get a DHCP addy from that port.

>I want to receive DHCP addresses on my wired network, from the wbr. I
>assume I'll have to give the wbr 1 address from the ISP. I'd like the
>remainder of the addresses -- for 4 computers -- to come from the wbr. How
>do I get the wbr to route wired computers to the Internet?

By using the router properly !! Its a router, its designed to link two
networks (the internet and your LAN), so use it to do that !!


--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt&gt;
December 25, 2004 1:45:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The cable modem is in the basement. If I connect the router to the WAN port
I have to have the router in the basement. I have computers on the 2nd
floor of my house that get poor wireless reception if the router is down in
the basement, so I was trying to avoid that.

I'll find another solution.

Thanks for your insight.

"Mark McIntyre" <markmcintyre@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:9r6ps0921mu6bbdkccd171mfeacsr0t31t@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 14:53:15 -0600, in alt.internet.wireless , "Rick"
> <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:
>
> >I have a Compaq 2404 WBR 802.11b wireless router.
>
> why not just connect the above router directly to your cable modem, turn
on
> DHCP, configure all your clients to get addresses from it. You can
> generally run a long length of CAT5 from the modem to the router without
> any problems.
>
> >Currently, 2 computers are being passed dhcp addresses from the ISP. The
> >wireless router is not yet configured but when it is, it will also need a
> >dhcp address. However, if I can configure it correctly, it will be the
only
> >device receiving a dhcp client address.
>
> Yes.
>
> >The cable modem is attached to a hub. The hub is attached to the wbr at
one
> >of the 3 non-WAN ports on the wbr
>
> This just won't work. The router expects the modem to be on the WAN port,
> and will try to get a DHCP addy from that port.
>
> >I want to receive DHCP addresses on my wired network, from the wbr. I
> >assume I'll have to give the wbr 1 address from the ISP. I'd like the
> >remainder of the addresses -- for 4 computers -- to come from the wbr.
How
> >do I get the wbr to route wired computers to the Internet?
>
> By using the router properly !! Its a router, its designed to link two
> networks (the internet and your LAN), so use it to do that !!
>
>
> --
> Mark McIntyre
> CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
> CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt&gt;
Related resources
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 4:31:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Rick" <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote in
news:0u%yd.46951$mf7.43310@fe05.lga:

> I have a Compaq 2404 WBR 802.11b wireless router.
>
> Current configuration
> ==========================================
> I have a cable modem and a maximum of 2 dhcp client addressess allowed
> from my cable ISP. I have 4 computers, only 1 of which has a wireless
> adaptor. I don't have enough addresses.
>
> Currently, 2 computers are being passed dhcp addresses from the ISP.
> The wireless router is not yet configured but when it is, it will also
> need a dhcp address. However, if I can configure it correctly, it
> will be the only device receiving a dhcp client address.
>
> The cable modem is attached to a hub. The hub is attached to the wbr
> at one of the 3 non-WAN ports on the wbr (I assume the wbr is
> hardwired such that the WAN port needs to separately connected to the
> cable modem, but I haven't done that yet
> -- due to distance from the cable modem I was hoping to be able to
> route
> without using that WAN port).
>
> Problem
> ==========================================
> When I turn on dhcp at the wbr it never routes to/from any of the
> wired computers out to the Internet. However, it does -- in testing
> -- route a wireless computer to the Internet.
>
> What I want
> ==========================================
> I want to receive DHCP addresses on my wired network, from the wbr. I
> assume I'll have to give the wbr 1 address from the ISP. I'd like the
> remainder of the addresses -- for 4 computers -- to come from the wbr.
> How do I get the wbr to route wired computers to the Internet?
>
> Any suggestions to accomplish my goal?
>
>
>
>


You flip it. The modem connects to the WAN port on the router. You can
plug the hub into one of the LAN ports on the router to extend the
network. You can also connect one hub to another hub to extend the
network and so on and so on. The router can control over 200 computers
issuing a DHCP IP to each computer. The router also has a built in smart
switch. The router is the gateway device for the LAN and WAN. It is not
the hub.


http://tinyurl.com/6agku
http://tinyurl.com/leps

Duane :) 
Anonymous
December 25, 2004 7:01:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Rick <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:

> The cable modem is in the basement. If I connect the router to the WAN port
> I have to have the router in the basement.

No, you don't. Any of your Ethernet cables can be 100 meters long.
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 2:11:48 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 22:37:24 -0600, in alt.internet.wireless , "Rick"
<badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:

>The cable modem is in the basement. If I connect the router to the WAN port
>I have to have the router in the basement.

No, just run a long ethernet cable from the modem to the router WAN port -
you already have one, since you've somehow attached the modem to one of hte
router LAN ports....


For what its worth, my wireless router is currently around 100ft from my
modem, as the cable runs.
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt&gt;

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
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December 26, 2004 4:14:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Actually, yes, I do. I don't have cable run except for the one cable. It's
not an issue of acceptable cable length, it's an issue of where I can run
cable and distance from router. I would need 2 cables from the basement to
the first floor, and I only have 1, and no plans to run another.

"Neill Massello" <neillmassello@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:1gpcd2y.1j0ol4czhqcjwN%neillmassello@earthlink.net...
> Rick <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:
>
> > The cable modem is in the basement. If I connect the router to the WAN
port
> > I have to have the router in the basement.
>
> No, you don't. Any of your Ethernet cables can be 100 meters long.
>
December 26, 2004 4:16:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

It's not a question of cable length, but thanks for the try.

As it stands, I'll put the router in the basement and accept poor wireless
reception.

"Mark McIntyre" <markmcintyre@spamcop.net> wrote in message
news:gqsrs0p3bq52knkoqojmhumkj3d54g5met@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 22:37:24 -0600, in alt.internet.wireless , "Rick"
> <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:
>
> >The cable modem is in the basement. If I connect the router to the WAN
port
> >I have to have the router in the basement.
>
> No, just run a long ethernet cable from the modem to the router WAN port -
> you already have one, since you've somehow attached the modem to one of
hte
> router LAN ports....
>
>
> For what its worth, my wireless router is currently around 100ft from my
> modem, as the cable runs.
> --
> Mark McIntyre
> CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
> CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt&gt;
>
> ----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
News==----
> http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
Newsgroups
> ----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
=----
December 26, 2004 4:22:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Final solution:

I'll use the one long cable from basement to 1st floor to connect the modem
to the router. Then I'll put a wireless card on the basement computer as
well as the other computers. The solution is really to make nearly all the
computers wireless. If I kept the basement computer wired I would have had
to either run 2 cables -- 1 up to router and 1 down to basement computer --
or leave the router in the basement with poor wireless reception on the 2nd
floor.


"Rick" <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote in message
news:0u%yd.46951$mf7.43310@fe05.lga...
> I have a Compaq 2404 WBR 802.11b wireless router.
>
> Current configuration
> ==========================================
> I have a cable modem and a maximum of 2 dhcp client addressess allowed
from
> my cable ISP. I have 4 computers, only 1 of which has a wireless adaptor.
> I don't have enough addresses.
>
> Currently, 2 computers are being passed dhcp addresses from the ISP. The
> wireless router is not yet configured but when it is, it will also need a
> dhcp address. However, if I can configure it correctly, it will be the
only
> device receiving a dhcp client address.
>
> The cable modem is attached to a hub. The hub is attached to the wbr at
one
> of the 3 non-WAN ports on the wbr (I assume the wbr is hardwired such that
> the WAN port needs to separately connected to the cable modem, but I
haven't
> done that yet
> -- due to distance from the cable modem I was hoping to be able to route
> without using that WAN port).
>
> Problem
> ==========================================
> When I turn on dhcp at the wbr it never routes to/from any of the wired
> computers out to the Internet. However, it does -- in testing -- route a
> wireless computer to the Internet.
>
> What I want
> ==========================================
> I want to receive DHCP addresses on my wired network, from the wbr. I
> assume I'll have to give the wbr 1 address from the ISP. I'd like the
> remainder of the addresses -- for 4 computers -- to come from the wbr.
How
> do I get the wbr to route wired computers to the Internet?
>
> Any suggestions to accomplish my goal?
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 7:16:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Rick <badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:

> Actually, yes, I do. I don't have cable run except for the one cable. It's
> not an issue of acceptable cable length, it's an issue of where I can run
> cable and distance from router. I would need 2 cables from the basement to
> the first floor, and I only have 1, and no plans to run another.

If you need to connect devices in the basement, get a wired router (less
than $40 these days) for the basement and connect the long Ethernet
cable to one of its LAN ports. Upstairs, connect the other end of that
cable to one of your wireless router's LAN ports. Disable NAT and DHCP
functions on the upstairs router so that it functions as an access
point.
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 7:51:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 26 Dec 2004 01:22:09 -0600, in alt.internet.wireless , "Rick"
<badnew@goodnews.com> wrote:

>Final solution:
>
>I'll use the one long cable from basement to 1st floor to connect the modem
>to the router. Then I'll put a wireless card on the basement computer as
>well as the other computers. The solution is really to make nearly all the
>computers wireless. If I kept the basement computer wired I would have had
>to either run 2 cables -- 1 up to router and 1 down to basement computer --
>or leave the router in the basement with poor wireless reception on the 2nd
>floor.

Or as someone said, buy a wired router, put that in the basement attached
to your modem and basement computer (modem into WAN port, computer into LAN
port) and run your long cable up to your wireless router - attach to a LAN
port on it. Disable DHCP on the wireless router and all will work fine.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html&gt;
CLC readme: <http://www.ungerhu.com/jxh/clc.welcome.txt&gt;
!