Confusion about 108MBPS G?

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Does anyone know what's up with this standard and where we're headed? I
know there are a lot of names out there for what seems like the same
thing, I've heard it called Super G by some companies, Speed booster by
others, etc. Is this a situation like in the early days of 56K modems,
when we had US robotics out with x2, other companies out with 56K flex,
and eventually settled on the industry standard of V.90?

Right now, I have a Linksys WRT54GS. I want to invest in a G wireless
bridge, and a couple of wireless G adaptors for my PCs. If I buy
108MBPS peripherals, do I need to insure that they support so called
"speed
booster", like my Linksys or is 108MBPS the same standard no matter what
it's name is?
Thanks,
--Al
5 answers Last reply
More about confusion 108mbps
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Al Puzzuoli" <alpuzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1c397b1d6980b5449896b3@news.giganews.com...
    > Does anyone know what's up with this standard and where we're
    headed? I
    > know there are a lot of names out there for what seems like the same
    > thing, I've heard it called Super G by some companies, Speed booster
    by
    > others, etc. Is this a situation like in the early days of 56K
    modems,
    > when we had US robotics out with x2, other companies out with 56K
    flex,
    > and eventually settled on the industry standard of V.90?
    >
    > Right now, I have a Linksys WRT54GS. I want to invest in a G
    wireless
    > bridge, and a couple of wireless G adaptors for my PCs. If I buy
    > 108MBPS peripherals, do I need to insure that they support so called
    > "speed
    > booster", like my Linksys or is 108MBPS the same standard no matter
    what
    > it's name is?
    > Thanks,
    > --Al

    108mbs is not part of the 802.11g standard. It is proprietory methods
    by diffferent manufacturers. ALthough it should be 802.11g
    compliant meaning that it should work at the speeds specified by
    802.11g and compatible with 802.11b speeds. I dont think
    the WI-FI alliance does any interoperability testing at 108mbs because
    it is not a standard, so your best bet is to go with the same brand
    gear.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    This is the way I understand it. There are officially recognized
    standards called 802.11a/b/g plus a couple others:
    http://standards.ieee.org/wireless/

    Two big consumer wireless chipmakers (Atheros and Broadcom) have
    extended the 802.11g standards with their own proprietary wireless
    protocols to achieve faster data transfer rates. Atheros calls their
    extension "Super G", Broadcom calls their extension "125 High Speed
    Mode." However, both extensions maintain compatibility with 802.11g:

    Atheros - http://www.super-g.com/
    Broadcom - http://www.54g.org/

    Atheros and Broadcom sell their chips to networking companies like
    Netgear, Linksys, DLink, etc. Netgear sticks with Atheros chipsets,
    Linksys sticks with Broadcom chipsets. These companies are free to
    rename the extensions, so we have "108Mbps" (Netgear), "Speedbooster"
    (Linksys) and others.

    So if you want to try to achieve these higher speeds (which is quite
    difficult in real life), it's necessary to stick with one chipset
    manufacturer. In a practical sense, this means sticking with one
    consumer-level company like Netgear or Linksys or Dlink or...

    Lance
    *****

    Al Puzzuoli thought carefully and wrote on 12/26/2004 10:51 PM:
    > Does anyone know what's up with this standard and where we're headed? I
    > know there are a lot of names out there for what seems like the same
    > thing, I've heard it called Super G by some companies, Speed booster by
    > others, etc. Is this a situation like in the early days of 56K modems,
    > when we had US robotics out with x2, other companies out with 56K flex,
    > and eventually settled on the industry standard of V.90?
    >
    > Right now, I have a Linksys WRT54GS. I want to invest in a G wireless
    > bridge, and a couple of wireless G adaptors for my PCs. If I buy
    > 108MBPS peripherals, do I need to insure that they support so called
    > "speed
    > booster", like my Linksys or is 108MBPS the same standard no matter what
    > it's name is?
    > Thanks,
    > --Al
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    "Al Puzzuoli" <alpuzz@comcast.net> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1c397b1d6980b5449896b3@news.giganews.com...
    > Does anyone know what's up with this standard and where we're headed? I
    > know there are a lot of names out there for what seems like the same
    > thing, I've heard it called Super G by some companies, Speed booster by
    > others, etc. Is this a situation like in the early days of 56K modems,
    > when we had US robotics out with x2, other companies out with 56K flex,
    > and eventually settled on the industry standard of V.90?
    >
    > Right now, I have a Linksys WRT54GS. I want to invest in a G wireless
    > bridge, and a couple of wireless G adaptors for my PCs. If I buy
    > 108MBPS peripherals, do I need to insure that they support so called
    > "speed
    > booster", like my Linksys or is 108MBPS the same standard no matter what
    > it's name is?

    As far as I know there is Super G, and there is Pre-N(mimo). N I think is
    the new standard that cannot be used yet until its ratified. Pre N is
    looking better than Super G. However it depends how urgently you want it. If
    you can wait however many months it is until the N protocol is ratified and
    N products appear then fine, if you can't and want 108mbps now, MIMO imho
    (pre-n) looks better than Super G, certainly in my experience. Better signal
    quality, and longer range. Though whether their quoted ranges are accurate
    or not I don't know. As for your speed booster link sys I'm afraid I don't
    know much about it. I would guess you need to stick to the same technology
    all round whether that be pre-n, super g or speed booster to get the full
    108mbps as the implementations of 108mbps will be different.

    Daniel
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    108mbps, although doesn't appear to be a standard, you can obtain such
    speeds with at least two different brands. The Netgear WG511T notebook
    card attains such speeds in conjunction with the Netgear WGR624 as well
    as D-Link's DI-624 and DWL-2100AP. I've tried various notebook cards,
    but the Netgear WG511T stands out.


    --
    doug Jamal
    brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Lance <lltbhill@link_earth.net> wrote in
    news:33av0uF3u0gbsU1@individual.net:

    > This is the way I understand it. There are officially recognized
    > standards called 802.11a/b/g plus a couple others:
    > http://standards.ieee.org/wireless/
    >
    > Two big consumer wireless chipmakers (Atheros and Broadcom) have
    > extended the 802.11g standards with their own proprietary
    > wireless protocols to achieve faster data transfer rates.
    > Atheros calls their extension "Super G", Broadcom calls their
    > extension "125 High Speed Mode." However, both extensions
    > maintain compatibility with 802.11g:
    >
    > Atheros - http://www.super-g.com/
    > Broadcom - http://www.54g.org/
    >
    > Atheros and Broadcom sell their chips to networking companies
    > like Netgear, Linksys, DLink, etc. Netgear sticks with Atheros
    > chipsets, Linksys sticks with Broadcom chipsets. These companies
    > are free to rename the extensions, so we have "108Mbps"
    > (Netgear), "Speedbooster" (Linksys) and others.
    >
    > So if you want to try to achieve these higher speeds (which is
    > quite difficult in real life), it's necessary to stick with one
    > chipset manufacturer. In a practical sense, this means sticking
    > with one consumer-level company like Netgear or Linksys or Dlink
    > or...
    >
    > Lance

    Supporting Lance's view:

    The various vendors are breaking ranks to introduce go-faster
    features that differentiate their products and lock users into
    their brand.

    My advice is to not be taken in, stick with the WiFi ratified
    standards.
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