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Need to Confirm Power Adapter for SMC 7004AWBR

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 1:55:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

If someone out there can please confirm the info on the power adapter
which originally came (and should now be connected to) with the SMC
7004AWBR wireless broadband router.

Unfortunately, my router became seperated from the power adapter and I
can't locate a power adapter with the SMC logo on it. What I think came
with the router has the name \"HON_KWANG\" on it. The output matches
the specs on the router-12VDC 1500mA. Input-120V 60Hz 35W, Model No.-
D12-15A. It also states it is a PLUG IN CLASS 2 TRANSFORMER.

Your help will be much appreciated.


--
rcgrosz
brought to you by http://www.wifi-forum.com/
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 1:55:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 22:55:42 GMT, rcgrosz
<rcgrosz.1hzy1n@WiFi-Forum_dot_com> wrote:

>If someone out there can please confirm the info on the power adapter
>which originally came (and should now be connected to) with the SMC
>7004AWBR wireless broadband router.

Clarence Dold already answered the question (9VDC 1A).
However, if you're ever again stuck with the same problem, and the
incompetent manufacturer didn't see fit to label the power adapter
requirments (and polarity) on the case, you can always lookup the
FCCID number at:
https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/Gener...
The power adapters are type certified along with the equipment and are
always both listed and photographed. You'll find the FCC ID on the
serial number tag.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 4:06:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

rcgrosz <rcgrosz.1hzy1n@wifi-forum_dot_com> wrote:
> If someone out there can please confirm the info on the power adapter
> which originally came (and should now be connected to) with the SMC
> 7004AWBR wireless broadband router.

My SMC7004WFW has a power adapter labelled DVE Model No DV-91A
input 120VAC 170mA, output 9VDC 1000mA

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 1:08:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
> However, if you're ever again stuck with the same problem, and the
> incompetent manufacturer didn't see fit to label the power adapter
> requirments (and polarity) on the case, you can always lookup the
> FCCID number at:
> https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/Gener...
> The power adapters are type certified along with the equipment and are
> always both listed and photographed. You'll find the FCC ID on the
> serial number tag.

That's downright handy. I always use a label maker to add the device
information to the power adapter. Even if they have the same vendor name
on them, I still want to be sure I have the right one. It also makes it
easier to power cycle a device by pulling the right plug at the power
strip. SMC7004AWBR - FCC ID HED7004ACC - Same DVE power supply as the
SMC7004WFW. That doesn't match the original poster's comments, though.
It's 9v, not 12v. Maybe there's more than one SMC7004AWBR.

---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 1:08:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 10:08:52 +0000 (UTC),
dold@XReXXNeedX.usenet.us.com wrote:

>Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>> However, if you're ever again stuck with the same problem, and the
>> incompetent manufacturer didn't see fit to label the power adapter
>> requirments (and polarity) on the case, you can always lookup the
>> FCCID number at:
>> https://gullfoss2.fcc.gov/prod/oet/cf/eas/reports/Gener...
>> The power adapters are type certified along with the equipment and are
>> always both listed and photographed. You'll find the FCC ID on the
>> serial number tag.

>That's downright handy. I always use a label maker to add the device
>information to the power adapter. Even if they have the same vendor name
>on them, I still want to be sure I have the right one. It also makes it
>easier to power cycle a device by pulling the right plug at the power
>strip. SMC7004AWBR - FCC ID HED7004ACC - Same DVE power supply as the
>SMC7004WFW. That doesn't match the original poster's comments, though.
>It's 9v, not 12v. Maybe there's more than one SMC7004AWBR.

I could spew some boring history on why the wall wart has to be type
certified along with the device. As usual, it was politics, not
technology that drove the decision. Think TI-99/4A game machine.

That SMC7004AWBR router isn't the only device that will run on an
assortment of power adapter voltages. Well designed switching power
supplies inside the boxes do the trick. Do you recall when I tested
my BEFW11S4 and found that it would run just fine with an applied
voltage down to about 3.7VDC even though the sticker said 12VDC?
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com/pics/drivel/slides/low...
Same with a WRT54Gv2 when I tested it. Looking through the FCC data
on the various WRT54G mutations, I found that the original adapter was
5VDC, while the current one is 12VDC. Juggling adapter voltages is
common.

The apparent trend is towards having everything run on 12VDC. There
are various techy reasons for this, but the obvious motivation is
cost. 12VDC seems to be the most common wall wart and therefore the
cheapest. I haven't bothered to calculate the efficiency, but
methinks 12VDC might offer some benifits there. It's a tradeoff
between diode forward conduction losses in the wall wart, versus
switching regulator efficiency in the box. A project for another day.

Anyways, one of the side benifits is that the boxes can be run off of
12VDC solar power, cheezy battery packs, GelCells, automobile power,
and a common power bus. Also, don't assume that just because the
sticker says "12VDC 1Amp" that the unit actually draws 1A (or smokes
12watts). That's just the rating on the wall wart, not the current
drain. It's always less than the sticker rating. Usually much less.



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 10:06:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>>SMC7004WFW. That doesn't match the original poster's comments, though.
>>It's 9v, not 12v. Maybe there's more than one SMC7004AWBR.

> supplies inside the boxes do the trick. Do you recall when I tested
> my BEFW11S4 and found that it would run just fine with an applied
> voltage down to about 3.7VDC even though the sticker said 12VDC?

My comment was pointed toward identifying the power adapter that used to be
attached to the SMC. I would dig around in the spare parts box looking for
the one with the DVE label. As for getting something to work... I'd still
like to use the one that came with it. I have trouble distinguishing
amongst the dozens of nearly identical round plugs that differ in inner
diameter or outer diameter or length by just a little bit. The polarity is
probably fairly standard. Current draw of the device is pretty low.
Voltage might not matter much, although I'd like to stay with whatever came
with it. The intermittent contact from a wrong sized plug might be more of
a problem than anything else.

---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
December 29, 2004 10:06:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 19:06:12 +0000 (UTC),
dold@XReXXNeedX.usenet.us.com wrote:

>The intermittent contact from a wrong sized plug might be more of
>a problem than anything else.

Once upon a time, a manufactory of remote serial terminal servers
decided to replace their defective wall warts, which tended to catch
fire, with a more substantial equivalent. Unfortunately, they weren't
very careful about the selection of power connectors. The center pin
on the terminal server was 1.6mm, while the plugs were 2.1mm or 2.5mm
(I forgot which). They would sorta fit and worked as long as one
didn't touch anything, move anything, slam the door, breathe, etc.
Intermittent would be an understatement.

Faced with the task of replaceing connectors on 15 terminal servers in
5 different locations, in 3 states, I elected to take a short cut. I
found some suitable brass shim stock and rolled it around a mandrel to
form something that resembled a roll pin. I used a Dremel tool to cut
the tube to size. I then crammed it into the power plug. No more
intermittents. I mailed a supply of adapter tubes to the various
locations, which were successfully installed by office personnel.

When I informed the manufactory of the problem, I was immediately
innundated with phone calls from corporate hindquarters and their
legal office. Apparently, they were worried that they had compounded
a hazzard and was hunting for litigatory relief. After I assured them
that this was not the case, and that my fix was satisfactory, I was
again innundated by phone calls from their field service and
engineering departments asking how I had done it, what thickness, what
size mandrel, what cut length, etc. I ended up making a drawing
suitable for manufacturing and faxed them a copy. I hadn't seen any,
but I was told that they shipped their available stock of power
supplies with oversized connectors and shims, until someone gave them
a clue that the UL certification might be "affected" by the change.

I still carry some shim stock around for the purpose.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
!