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Setup Westell 6100 & Linksys BEFW11S4

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Anonymous
December 30, 2004 5:43:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi all,

Just got DSL from BellSouth and need to know how to setup my BEFW11S4 v.3 &
Westell 6100 so that I can surf 'net with my other computers. Tried to
setup using the info on linksys site, but no go. Does CAT5 cable from modem
plug into the WAN port on router or LAN port? Bellsouth says that I need to
set modem to bridge mode, but I tried that also & no joy. Could someone
give me concise setup instructions? <g> I'm a dummy with this. When I had
dial-up, I went from NIC to router & used WinRoute Lite with no problems.

Gateway G6-350
WinXP Pro w/SP1
256MB RAM
20GB HD
Linksys NC100 Fast Ethernet Adapter
BEFW11S4 v.3
Westell 6100 DSL modem

Thanks a bunch!

Louie
Chiefland, FL, USA
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 9:44:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 02:43:22 -0500, "Louie" <louie@spammenot.com>
wrote:

>Just got DSL from BellSouth and need to know how to setup my BEFW11S4 v.3 &
>Westell 6100 so that I can surf 'net with my other computers. Tried to
>setup using the info on linksys site, but no go. Does CAT5 cable from modem
>plug into the WAN port on router or LAN port?

The connecting cable goes from the DSL modem to WAN port on the
BEFW11S4.

>Bellsouth says that I need to
>set modem to bridge mode, but I tried that also & no joy. Could someone
>give me concise setup instructions? <g>

http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6096

>I'm a dummy with this. When I had
>dial-up, I went from NIC to router & used WinRoute Lite with no problems.

Make sure Winroute is NOT running on your setup computah.

There are plenty of issues that need to be dealt with before you deal
with the router. Do you have a sync (carrier) lite showing a DSL
connection on the DSL modem? Have you installed DSL microfilters on
*ALL* your phones (including fax, modem, wall phones, garage phone,
answering machine, cable set-top box, satellite receiver, etc)? Do
you have a PPPoE login and password to install on the router WAN
connection page? Is the modem in the bridged mode?
http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6405

>Gateway G6-350
>WinXP Pro w/SP1
>256MB RAM
>20GB HD
>Linksys NC100 Fast Ethernet Adapter
>BEFW11S4 v.3
>Westell 6100 DSL modem
>
>Thanks a bunch!
>
>Louie
>Chiefland, FL, USA
>

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:27:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:ih48t0dg7g1tvsv4cd66ion3ek4gv1nig1@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 02:43:22 -0500, "Louie" <louie@spammenot.com>
> wrote:
<snip>
> The connecting cable goes from the DSL modem to WAN port on the
> BEFW11S4.
>
> >Bellsouth says that I need to
> >set modem to bridge mode, but I tried that also & no joy. Could someone
> >give me concise setup instructions? <g>
>
> http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6096
<snip>
> Make sure Winroute is NOT running on your setup computah.
>
> There are plenty of issues that need to be dealt with before you deal
> with the router. Do you have a sync (carrier) lite showing a DSL
> connection on the DSL modem? Have you installed DSL microfilters on
> *ALL* your phones (including fax, modem, wall phones, garage phone,
> answering machine, cable set-top box, satellite receiver, etc)? Do
> you have a PPPoE login and password to install on the router WAN
> connection page? Is the modem in the bridged mode?
> http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6405

Thanks for info, Jeff. I guess *I* should have been more concise. 3AM is
not the time to troubleshoot after a long day! <g> I made sure that I
could connect using modem to NIC first. No trouble connecting @ 177.8 kbps.
DSL light is steady green, *all* filters have been installed, I input PPPoE
login and PW (same as modem, right?) & I put the modem in bridged mode, no
joy. Connected modem to WAN port, PC to LAN port 1 (right beside the WAN
port). Disabled WinRoute. Will peruse FAQ per your link and get back to
you. Thanks again

<snip>

Louie
Chiefland, FL, USA
Related resources
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:27:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 10:27:55 -0500, "Louie" <louie@spammenot.com>
wrote:

(chop...)
>> http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6096
>> http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6405

I forgot to mention the top level BellSouth FAQ:
http://www.dslreports.com/faq/bellsouth

>Thanks for info, Jeff. I guess *I* should have been more concise. 3AM is
>not the time to troubleshoot after a long day! <g>

No sympathy. Computers are best done under cover of darkness.

I wrote my answer at about 6:30AM, after 4 hours of sleep. We had a
big storm last night and the power was fluctuating wildly. I was
awakened by an exploding tree branch across the power lines and
figured this would be a good time to check some customers systems
before they arrived to work. While waiting for a database index
consistancy check, I decided to answer some usenet questions.
Incidentally, I'm suppose to be relaxing and on vacation or something.

>I made sure that I
>could connect using modem to NIC first. No trouble connecting @ 177.8 kbps.

I guess you have the "FastAccess Lite" version. 178kbits/sec is about
what you'll get with a benchmark test with 256/128kbits/sec service.

>DSL light is steady green, *all* filters have been installed, I input PPPoE
>login and PW (same as modem, right?)

Correct. Same login and passwd. Make sure the modem is in bridge
mode. However, I dunno if BellSouth authenticates by MAC address.
Therefore, you might wanna go to the page in the DI-624 where you set
the MAC address and have it clone the MAC address of your ethernet
card in your computah. I don't think this is really necessary, but it
doesn't hurt anything to do it. However, power cycle the modem and
router after you change the MAC address to make sure everything on the
WAN side gets the change.

> & I put the modem in bridged mode, no
>joy. Connected modem to WAN port, PC to LAN port 1 (right beside the WAN
>port). Disabled WinRoute. Will peruse FAQ per your link and get back to
>you. Thanks again

Good luck.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:52:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Success! <bg> Thanks one more time, Jeff! Found *very* concise
instructions at http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6323. Have a great and
prosperous New Year , man! BTW, how did you learn this stuff? Experience,
school?

Louie
Chiefland, FL, USA
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:52:54 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 10:52:53 -0500, "Louie" <louie@spammenot.com>
wrote:

>Success! <bg> Thanks one more time, Jeff! Found *very* concise
>instructions at http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6323. Have a great and
>prosperous New Year , man! BTW, how did you learn this stuff? Experience,
>school?

Congrats. Well, I believe in "Learn By Destroying". Actually, the
motto was from my college (Cal Poly, Pomona) motto of "Learn by Doing"
which I interpreted somewhat creatively. I started by tearing things
apart to see how they work. Sometimes, I also managed to put them
back together. That includes disecting software and protocols. Once
one knows how things work, troubleshooting is easy. Having personally
made all the mistakes in advance, it's fairly easy to recognize them
when someone else repeats them.

The basic principle is similar to biblical burnt offerings. One must
offer sacrifice before any problems can be solved. I usually immolate
an old motherboard on the hibbachi as an offering to the computer gods
before attempting any major troubleshooting exercise. Burnt offerings
worked well for many centuries and is documented in excruciating
detail in Leviticus. Don't knock it until you've tried it.

Also, it's often helpful, but not necessary, to be awake before
attempting any troubleshooting. I find that my ability to think
logically fails badly when asleep or distracted.

Actually, I've been in various forms of RF and electronics for about
40 years. Every year, about 1/4 of what I know becomes obsolete.
That's not a problem if one undestands how things work, and can
troubleshoot logically. It does require considerable reading and
field experience (something you won't find from the typical phone
support droid). For example, I still don't understand how WDS works,
and probably won't until I read the docs and setup a test system.

Good luck.

--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 11:39:58 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:4ia8t0hlj4bej9unjb8nlqhnd60r3h3upf@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 30 Dec 2004 10:52:53 -0500, "Louie" <louie@spammenot.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Success! <bg> Thanks one more time, Jeff! Found *very* concise
> >instructions at http://www.dslreports.com/faq/6323. Have a great and
> >prosperous New Year , man! BTW, how did you learn this stuff?
Experience,
> >school?
>
> Congrats. Well, I believe in "Learn By Destroying". Actually, the
> motto was from my college (Cal Poly, Pomona) motto of "Learn by Doing"
> which I interpreted somewhat creatively. I started by tearing things
> apart to see how they work. Sometimes, I also managed to put them
> back together. That includes disecting software and protocols. Once
> one knows how things work, troubleshooting is easy. Having personally
> made all the mistakes in advance, it's fairly easy to recognize them
> when someone else repeats them.
>
> The basic principle is similar to biblical burnt offerings. One must
> offer sacrifice before any problems can be solved. I usually immolate
> an old motherboard on the hibbachi as an offering to the computer gods
> before attempting any major troubleshooting exercise. Burnt offerings
> worked well for many centuries and is documented in excruciating
> detail in Leviticus. Don't knock it until you've tried it.
>
> Also, it's often helpful, but not necessary, to be awake before
> attempting any troubleshooting. I find that my ability to think
> logically fails badly when asleep or distracted.
>
> Actually, I've been in various forms of RF and electronics for about
> 40 years. Every year, about 1/4 of what I know becomes obsolete.
> That's not a problem if one undestands how things work, and can
> troubleshoot logically. It does require considerable reading and
> field experience (something you won't find from the typical phone
> support droid). For example, I still don't understand how WDS works,
> and probably won't until I read the docs and setup a test system.
>
> Good luck.
>
> --
> Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
> 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
> Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558

Dang, that sounds familiar. <g> I've been a residential & commercial
electrician for the past 20-25 yrs. Been fooling around with PC's (CoCo,
Amiga, Commodore 64) since 1980 or so. I'm a firm believer in learn by
doing, smoke checking (test to destruction), float checking (throwing things
in the ocean to see if it floats, old Navy here, USS Saginaw LST 1188 <g>)
and taking things apart to see how they work. Have pulled all niters
troubleshooting building electrical, alarm, UPS, emergency generator &
computer systems way too often. My instructors up at Great Lakes always
told us if you don't know how to do something, get as much info as you can
on the subject and *teach* yourself, you can do almost anything you want to
do with the right knowledge & tools. Been attempting to teach myself
networking (wired, wireless, optical) for past 6 months. This is first time
I've had anything to do with broadband Internet and got stuck.

I'll be going over the dslreports.com site very closely as I see there's a
ton of info to be gained there. Thanks for the heads-up and have a great
New Year, guy!

Louie
Chiefland, FL (Gator Country),USA
February 27, 2010 4:17:52 PM

For all you guys with DSL Modems who want to use a router:

First of all, it doesn't make any difference what kind of modem you have or whether or not it is in bridge mode. It will work just fine either way. Most modems come out of the box in "normal" mode. That is non-bridge mode. In this mode, the modem uses its own internal DHCP server to serve up an IP address in the "Private range" to your computer. Your computer must have an IP address to connect to the internet and gets it automatically from the router. Herein lies the rub: that IP range (or more correctly "subnet") is usually the one that goes from 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.1.255. Guess what? That is the exact same subnet that the linksys and most other brands ALSO use for their own DHCP servers. You CANNOT have your modem's DHCP subnet the same as your router's. Routers use NAT (Net address translation) and dynamic porting to get from your ISP modem to your computer and the subnets must be different.

Here's your easiest solution:
If you a linksys user then type your router's IP in your browser like this: http://192.168.1.1 , you will get a login prompt. If you were really on top of your game when you set this thing up, type in the password that you gave it. If all you did was open the box and plug it in, type in "admin" in the password blank; there is no default user name for linksys but "admin" is the default password. You should now see a setup page for the router. About half way down there are settings for your DHCP server and a changable "Local IP Address". It will most likely be the factory default of "192.168.1.1". All you have to do is change one number, the third octet, to make this number "192.168.0.1". Leave everything else alone, click the save changes button at the bottom of the screen and you will be stylin'!

Take note that your router will refresh with a "cannot find server" error after you do this. This is because the computer's NIC card still has the address from the old "192.168.1.XXX" that the router originally issued it. If you are a beginning user, you can just restart your computer and it will get the new IP address from the router and you should be fine. If you are a power user ;)  then, in windows, go to start => run=> and type in "CMD". You will get your command prompt screen. Now type in "ipconfig /release". (Note: leave my quotes out, but type everything else, spaces and all, just like you see it here.) Your IP address, DNS and everything should come up all zeros like this: "0.0.0.0". Now type "ipconfig /renew". You should come up with the new "192.168.0.xxx" address from your router. You should now be able to surf your favorite websites! If for some reason, you still can't, turn off your router and modem. Now turn the modem on first and then your router, that should do it.

Mark--Athens Ga.

Bridge the digital divide between the rich and poor in this country! Come visit us at www.freeitathens.org !
Anonymous
February 27, 2010 5:04:37 PM

And how are you going to forward ports when you setup double NAT? It's much better and simpler to put the DSL modem in Bridge Mode.

Also, please don't dredge up necoposts.
!