Using non-network printer on a network - adapter?

I have a small home (file sharing) network using a hub and a linksys router.

I want to share a HP 5 LaserJet printer on the network. The printer is -not- network ready, but I do not want to install the printer on any single PC via a parallel port.

What I am looking for is some sort of simple parallel port / network adapter that allows me to plug the printer into this adapter then plug the adapter into the hub or router.

Seems simple enough in theory, but I cannot find one anywhere. Do they exist? What brand? Where to buy?

Thanks,
CH
8 answers Last reply
More about using network printer network adapter
  1. look for a device called jet direct.

    how do you shoot the devil in the back? what happens if you miss? -verbal
  2. Here is a forum you may find more info about the Jet Direct answer by jihiggs. It may be a place to repost your question as it is HP specific.

    http://forums.itrc.hp.com/cm/QuestionAnswer/1,,0x789ae7613948d5118fef0090279cd0f9,00.html

    Compare costs of anything you buy to the possibility of simply changing the router to one like the D-Link DI-704-P which has a printer port. You may connect the printer to it. It has printer sharing software.

    Also it has occassionally been availble on rebate.

    Here is a link to one available on Ebay with an excellent description of the router.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2053195817

    Taken from the DLink website:
    The D-Link DI-704P is an Ethernet Broadband Gateway with a built-in four-port switch plus a print server function. The DI-704P provides the ability to share a single Ethernet Cable or DSL broadband connection and share a single printer among computers connected to the local network. The DI-704P is equipped with four 10/100Mbps Fast Ethernet ports and a bi-directional LPT port to support a direct printer connection. The DI-704P´s integrated Router and Firewall provide NAT, DHCP, and packet filtering services between the local network and the Internet. The DI-704P is targeted at small business and home users who want to connect multiple computers and share a single printer.


    Every working computer must be improved .... or replaced ...
  3. I just used a generic print server.
  4. Not quite sure I understand.
    How did you physically (cable) the printer to the network?

    Regards,
    CH
  5. <i>Here is a forum you may find more info about the Jet Direct answer by jihiggs. It may be a place to repost your question as it is HP specific.

    http://forums.itrc.hp.com/cm/QuestionAnswer/1,,0x789ae7613948d5118fef0090279cd0f9,00.html

    Compare costs of anything you buy to the possibility of simply changing the router to one like the D-Link DI-704-P which has a printer port. You may connect the printer to it. It has printer sharing software.

    Also it has occassionally been availble on rebate.

    Here is a link to one available on Ebay with an excellent description of the router.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2053195817

    Taken from the DLink website:
    The D-Link DI-704P is an Ethernet Broadband Gateway with a built-in four-port switch plus a print server function. The DI-704P provides the ability to share a single Ethernet Cable or DSL broadband connection and share a single printer among computers connected to the local network. The DI-704P is equipped with four 10/100Mbps Fast Ethernet ports and a bi-directional LPT port to support a direct printer connection. The DI-704P´s integrated Router and Firewall provide NAT, DHCP, and packet filtering services between the local network and the Internet. The DI-704P is targeted at small business and home users who want to connect multiple computers and share a single printer.</i>

    <b>VERY helpful reply and info/links. Just may buy that router. Guess I'll have to get info to compare the present Linksys and the D-Link. To be honest, I have had a few problems with the Linksys - especially with DHCP services... but that's another issue.</b>

    Regards,
    CH
  6. go <A HREF="http://www.dslreports.com/forum/dlink" target="_new"> here </A> for some good info on d-link products

    <font color=red><b> <A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Hills/9267/fuddef.html" target="_new">FUD</A></font color=red></b>
  7. If you don't feel like changing your router, I use a <A HREF="http://www.netgear.com/product_view.asp?xrp=6&yrp=15&zrp=60" target="_new"><font color=red>Netgear PS110</font color=red></A> which has 2 printer ports.

    <i>It's always the one thing you never suspected.</i>
  8. the print server just attatches to my router/switch through some cat 5 cable. my printer attaches to it through a regular DB25 parallel port.

    If I understand correctly (which very well may not be the case) then the print server converts the TCP/IP stuff to a parallel port type format and feeds it to the printer afterward. I had to install LPR (or something, whatever that is) to get it all working.

    This has allowed me to have the printer accesable to all the machines on the network without having to have a specific PC running in order to print. My generic print server works with up to 3 printers, and cost under a hundred bucks. It has never crashed or caused errors that I am aware of.
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