sfc command or windows repair

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

hello
I want to know when use sfc command and when repair windows from CD ?

thanks
--
New Life
5 answers Last reply
More about command windows repair
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    You run the System File Checker when you are experiencing problems with
    Windows that you suspect may be due to system files that have been changed
    or deleted.

    You perform a repair install when you are experiencing problems with Windows
    that cannot be solved in any other way.

    Ted Zieglar

    "Arad" <Arad@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:68EE493C-5B07-4370-A41D-8FC841E92E49@microsoft.com...
    > hello
    > I want to know when use sfc command and when repair windows from CD ?
    >
    > thanks
    > --
    > New Life
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    "Ted Zieglar" wrote:

    > You run the System File Checker when you are experiencing problems with
    > Windows that you suspect may be due to system files that have been changed
    > or deleted.
    >
    > You perform a repair install when you are experiencing problems with Windows
    > that cannot be solved in any other way.
    >
    > Ted Zieglar

    thanks, I understand , but not fully
    do you can tell me some example of each situation we must use one of them
    tools
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    To add to what Ted wrote, when running the System Files Checker (sfc.exe)
    chances are really slim that any of your data will be toasted. Using sfc is
    like using defrag or chkdsk, no big deal. Just system maintenance.

    [[If System File Checker discovers that a protected file has been
    overwritten, it retrieves the correct version of the file from the cache
    folder (%Systemroot%\System32\Dllcache) or the Windows installation source
    files, and then replaces the incorrect file. System File Checker also checks
    and repopulates the cache folder.]]

    The Dllcache folder contains Windows File Protection backup files.

    A repair install can be a big deal. With a repair install you stand a much
    better chance of toasting your data.

    scannow sfc (sfc.exe)
    http://www.updatexp.com/scannow-sfc.html

    Description of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 System File Checker
    (Sfc.exe)
    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=310747

    Description of the Windows File Protection Feature
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;222193

    [[Warning!
    Should you do a repair install; and is it the best choice?
    A Repair Install is not foolproof, and should not be considered the cure-all
    fix for non-boot situations. Check the link below for an option for
    recovering from a non-boot event. ]]

    Lots of info here...
    How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install
    http://michaelstevenstech.com/XPrepairinstall.htm

    --
    Hope this helps. Let us know.
    Wes

    In news:EF3A2A74-2FB2-48F5-B61F-48F782947637@microsoft.com,
    Arad <Arad@discussions.microsoft.com> hunted and pecked:
    > "Ted Zieglar" wrote:
    >
    >> You run the System File Checker when you are experiencing problems
    >> with Windows that you suspect may be due to system files that have
    >> been changed or deleted.
    >>
    >> You perform a repair install when you are experiencing problems with
    >> Windows that cannot be solved in any other way.
    >>
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >
    > thanks, I understand , but not fully
    > do you can tell me some example of each situation we must use one of
    > them tools
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    Arad wrote:
    > "Ted Zieglar" wrote:
    >
    >
    >>You run the System File Checker when you are experiencing problems with
    >>Windows that you suspect may be due to system files that have been changed
    >>or deleted.
    >>
    >>You perform a repair install when you are experiencing problems with Windows
    >>that cannot be solved in any other way.
    >>
    >>Ted Zieglar
    >
    >
    > thanks, I understand , but not fully
    > do you can tell me some example of each situation we must use one of them
    > tools
    >
    >
    >

    What Ted was saying was, try SFC first, and if that doesn't work do a
    repair install, but the latter should be a last resort. Maybe you should
    tell *us* what problems you're having.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    On Sun, 5 Dec 2004 07:15:16 -0700, "Wesley Vogel"

    >To add to what Ted wrote, when running the System Files Checker (sfc.exe)
    >chances are really slim that any of your data will be toasted. Using sfc is
    >like using defrag or chkdsk, no big deal. Just system maintenance.

    Any of these (and anything else that writes to disk, which includes
    Windows itself) can be a problem if the hardware's flaky, hard drive
    is failing, or file system is messed up. Which are three likely
    causes of general PC distress that may suggest a re-install.

    The more is written, the worse the risk - so I'd consider SFC and
    ChkDsk to be lower risk than Defrag and a re-install.

    >A repair install can be a big deal. With a repair install you stand a much
    >better chance of toasting your data.

    Yep.

    >A Repair Install is not foolproof, and should not be considered the cure-all
    >fix for non-boot situations.

    http://cquirke.mvps.org/reinst.htm refers.


    >--------------- ---- --- -- - - - -
    I'm baaaack!
    >--------------- ---- --- -- - - - -
Ask a new question

Read More

Microsoft CD-Rom Command Prompt Windows XP