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WGR614 as range extender / WAP

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 2, 2005 2:38:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hello all,

I picked up a Netgear WGR614 for really cheap ($19) with the idea of
using it as a range extender (or WAP, if that would be the correct
term). I've got another WGR614 that I've been using as a router from
our cable internet connection, serving both wired and wireless
machines. It works well but I'd like to add the second WGR614 to
provide a stronger wireless signal in the parts of the house where the
signal from the existing WGR614 is a bit weak. Any ideas how I can go
about this?

I've connected the second WGR614 to the first one using a wired
connection, plugged into the second WGR614's "internet" port. But I'm
having a bit of trouble working out how to configure the second
WGR614. I've tried various options for DHCP, etc. but can't quite get
there. (Leaving DHCP for the second WGR614 turned on sort-of works,
but it seems laggy and unreliable.) The two WGR614s are configured to
use different 802.11 channels.

I've tried googling but haven't found any instructions for this
specific model. Anybody out there who has successfully daisy-chained
two WGR614's and would be willing to share their wisdom? Thanks.


--
"You can't learn anything except from eccentrics. It has
something to do with their getting your attention in the
first place." - Late UCLA art teacher, Mary Holmes
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 2, 2005 2:38:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sat, 01 Jan 2005 23:38:31 GMT, chawtrey@hotpop.com (Charles
Hawtrey) wrote:

>I picked up a Netgear WGR614 for really cheap ($19) with the idea of
>using it as a range extender (or WAP, if that would be the correct
>term).

Nope. The WGR614 is a "wireless router" or an ethernet router with a
WAP (wireless access point) in the same package. A "range extender"
is a marketting term and is something completely different.

>I've got another WGR614 that I've been using as a router from
>our cable internet connection, serving both wired and wireless
>machines. It works well but I'd like to add the second WGR614 to
>provide a stronger wireless signal in the parts of the house where the
>signal from the existing WGR614 is a bit weak. Any ideas how I can go
>about this?

Sure. See:
http://kbserver.netgear.com/kb_web_files/n101236.asp
Basically, you leave your existing main WGR614 router alone. No
changes are needed there.

The 2nd WGR614 router get configured with:
1. A different IP address from the first WGR614. If the main
WGR614 uses 192.168.1.1, then the 2nd one should be 192.168.1.2
in the same Class C IP block.
2. Turn OFF the DHCP server. Only one DHCP server on the LAN
at a time.
3. Nothing gets plugged into the WAN port. Connect a crossover
ethernet cable between one of the LAN ports on the main WGR614
and one of the LAN ports on the 2nd WGR614. This converts it
from a router to a WAP.
4. Use the same SSID on both wireless boxes. However, use
different non-overlapping channels (1, 6, 11) to prevent mutual
interference.

>I've connected the second WGR614 to the first one using a wired
>connection, plugged into the second WGR614's "internet" port. But I'm
>having a bit of trouble working out how to configure the second
>WGR614. I've tried various options for DHCP, etc. but can't quite get
>there. (Leaving DHCP for the second WGR614 turned on sort-of works,
>but it seems laggy and unreliable.) The two WGR614s are configured to
>use different 802.11 channels.

Mostly wrong. Nice try. See above instructions.

>I've tried googling but haven't found any instructions for this
>specific model. Anybody out there who has successfully daisy-chained
>two WGR614's and would be willing to share their wisdom? Thanks.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 2, 2005 8:50:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

Thanks for your help. It's working fine now. Just one small
correction, for the record:

>The 2nd WGR614 router get configured with:

> 1. A different IP address from the first WGR614. If the main
> WGR614 uses 192.168.1.1, then the 2nd one should be 192.168.1.2
> in the same Class C IP block.

> 2. Turn OFF the DHCP server. Only one DHCP server on the LAN
> at a time.

> 3. Nothing gets plugged into the WAN port. Connect a crossover
> ethernet cable between one of the LAN ports on the main WGR614
> and one of the LAN ports on the 2nd WGR614. This converts it
> from a router to a WAP.

The cable should be a "normal" ethernet cable, not a crossover cable.

> 4. Use the same SSID on both wireless boxes. However, use
> different non-overlapping channels (1, 6, 11) to prevent mutual
> interference.



--
"You can't learn anything except from eccentrics. It has
something to do with their getting your attention in the
first place." - Late UCLA art teacher, Mary Holmes
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 2, 2005 9:24:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Charles Hawtrey wrote:
> Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>
> Thanks for your help. It's working fine now. Just one small
> correction, for the record:
>
>> 3. Nothing gets plugged into the WAN port. Connect a crossover
>> ethernet cable between one of the LAN ports on the main WGR614
>> and one of the LAN ports on the 2nd WGR614. This converts it
>> from a router to a WAP.
>
> The cable should be a "normal" ethernet cable, not a crossover cable.
>

For this unit, it can be either. The ports are auto-adjusting. Many other
routers would either need a crossover cable or have a pushbutton switch to
change a port to cable it to another router.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
January 3, 2005 1:38:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Charles Hawtrey <chawtrey@hotpop.com> wrote:
> Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
>> 3. Nothing gets plugged into the WAN port. Connect a crossover
>> ethernet cable between one of the LAN ports on the main WGR614
>> and one of the LAN ports on the 2nd WGR614. This converts it
>> from a router to a WAP.

> The cable should be a "normal" ethernet cable, not a crossover cable.

The cable should be a crossover to make this a set of instructions that
applies to any router, and by network design. A normal ethernet cable only
works for you because the WR614 has auto-sensing ports.

Quoting from the users' guide:
" The WGR614 v4 router incorporates Auto Uplink technology (also called
MDI/MDIX). Each LOCAL Ethernet port will automatically sense whether the
Ethernet cable plugged into the port should have a normal connection (e.g.
connecting to a PC) or an uplink connection (e.g. connecting to a router,
switch, or hub). That port will then configure itself to the correct
configuration. This feature also eliminates the need to worry about
crossover cables, as Auto Uplink will accommodate either type of cable to
make the right connection. "

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
!