Internet connections from my motorhome

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
from their RV's.

I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.

They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.

Does anyone know how I could do this?

Bill L
20 answers Last reply
More about internet connections motorhome
  1. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the lobby
    areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I don't know about
    Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in the parking lot at ground
    level, but I'll bet by not being physically in the lobby you'll get bleed
    over from the in-room pay wireless service on the floors above, meaning you
    could get the free login screen or be forced to the pay login screen.
    Typically $9.95 a day or something like that.

    If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access service and
    the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo unlimited. Speeds
    vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in the boonies you'll only get
    40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than nothing.

    -- Paul


    "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    > from their RV's.
    >
    > I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    > Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    > fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.
    >
    > They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.
    >
    > Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >
    > Bill L
  2. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Bill Lederer wrote:
    > I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    > from their RV's.
    >
    > I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    > Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    > fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.
    >
    > They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.
    >
    > Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >
    > Bill L
    If someone has not secured their wireless network, then yes, you are
    capable of surfing the web at their expense. To many, this is a moral
    issue so get permission first. Besides, there are a lot of dummy
    networks setup simply for logging purposes. If they have logging
    features similar to that of the Netgear WGR614, then they know the IP
    address, the websites visited, the times and even the IP address of the
    advertisements in the sites they've visited. Be careful.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Doug,

    Thank you for the reply.

    So, the answer is YES. With the setup I described All I have to do is
    turn on the laptop and good o'l Yahoo will pop up on the screen.

    How cool is that!

    Bill L

    On Thu, 06 Jan 2005 20:43:39 GMT, Doug Jamal <bishiv6AT@yahooDOT.com>
    wrote:

    >Bill Lederer wrote:
    >> I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >> from their RV's.
    >>
    >> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    >> fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.
    >>
    >> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>
    >> Bill L
    >If someone has not secured their wireless network, then yes, you are
    >capable of surfing the web at their expense. To many, this is a moral
    >issue so get permission first. Besides, there are a lot of dummy
    >networks setup simply for logging purposes. If they have logging
    >features similar to that of the Netgear WGR614, then they know the IP
    >address, the websites visited, the times and even the IP address of the
    >advertisements in the sites they've visited. Be careful.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Bill Lederer <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote:
    > I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    > from their RV's.

    > I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    > Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    > fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.

    > They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.

    > Does anyone know how I could do this?

    Essentially the same way you do at home.

    Take a test run around your home town. Try a Starbucks coffee shop parking
    lot. Some of them have "T-Mobile Hot Spot" signs in the window. Your
    wireless shoud indicate that it has a connection. Try to open Internet
    Explorer to your normal home page. It should bring up a login window to
    the T-Mobile network, which is a paid network, but that will show that you
    can connect to the Wireless network there.

    If Residence Inn offers free access to their guests, there may or may not
    be some registration required. There is also a question of whether they
    care about you accessing the network from their parking lot without being a
    paying guest.
    http://marriotthsia.netlinkrg.com/Default.asp?EPNAVCEC=InProcess
    doesn't say that it is wireless. I saved a bookmark to the provider of
    wireless access in the Denver Marriott.
    http://www.suitespeed.com/Site.asp?id=110

    http://www.koa.com/hotspotzz/index.htm shows wireless KOA sites, powered by
    http://www.hotspotzz.com/ which is a subscription service that has
    locations at KOA and some trendy coffee shops.

    http://www.wi-fihotspotlist.com/search.html might be helpful, but it isn't
    clear which locations cost money and which are free.

    http://intel.jiwire.com/ lets you search by zip code, and show only free,
    only paid, or both.

    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  5. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Many chains now offer free high speed internet. A couple of weeks ago I
    stayed in Hampton Inns on 2 consecutive nights.
    First night there was an Ethernet Cable that I plugged in and was instantly
    connected after punching in the password given me by the front desk.
    The next night was similar only this time it was wireless. Also needed a
    password given to me by the front desk. I have a wireless card in my
    computer. I think they might lend you one if you don't have your own.

    "Paul" <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote in message
    news:10trn8k419af077@news.supernews.com...
    > More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the lobby
    > areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I don't know
    > about Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in the parking lot
    > at ground level, but I'll bet by not being physically in the lobby you'll
    > get bleed over from the in-room pay wireless service on the floors above,
    > meaning you could get the free login screen or be forced to the pay login
    > screen. Typically $9.95 a day or something like that.
    >
    > If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access service
    > and the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo unlimited.
    > Speeds vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in the boonies you'll
    > only get 40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than nothing.
    >
    > -- Paul
    >
    >
    > "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    > news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >> from their RV's.
    >>
    >> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    >> fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.
    >>
    >> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>
    >> Bill L
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Bill Lederer <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote:

    > So, the answer is YES. With the setup I described All I have to do is
    > turn on the laptop and good o'l Yahoo will pop up on the screen.

    > How cool is that!

    Very cool.
    The problem is finding a hot spot that you can/should connect to.
    They are prevalent, but not pervasive.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  7. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    It looks like the Verizon BroadBand thing would be the best. I do have
    Verizon DSL, at home now.

    It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?

    Also, I see thay sell some sort of hand-held thing to find signals.

    Bill L

    On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:50:50 -0500, "Paul"
    <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote:

    >More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the lobby
    >areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I don't know about
    >Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in the parking lot at ground
    >level, but I'll bet by not being physically in the lobby you'll get bleed
    >over from the in-room pay wireless service on the floors above, meaning you
    >could get the free login screen or be forced to the pay login screen.
    >Typically $9.95 a day or something like that.
    >
    >If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access service and
    >the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo unlimited. Speeds
    >vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in the boonies you'll only get
    >40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than nothing.
    >
    >-- Paul
    >
    >
    >"Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >> from their RV's.
    >>
    >> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    >> fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.
    >>
    >> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.
    >>
    >> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>
    >> Bill L
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    benefit.. it's FREE. There are a multitude out there that work very very
    well, but cost about $20.

    Personally, I use Both Winc (on my laptop) and PocketWinc (on my PDA - an Hp
    iPAQ with built in Wi-Fi).. at http://www.cirond.com/products.php , Just
    $19.95, and actually lets you connect your browser to open nodes it finds
    (rather than just tell you about em like Netstumbler does) (download and try
    it free for 30 days.. see what you think)

    While the Verizon Broadband thing is neat, it only works in limited areas,
    and drops back to NationalAccess speeds in areas that aren't EVDO yet.
    Unforunately, those areas are usually not outside cities (where most RV
    parks/places are) (Broadband (requires a Datacard, not a phone, seperate
    contract about $79 a month) and is about 400-500kb, and NationalAccess (can
    use a phone OR a datacard) is about 70-90kb connects).

    One bad part of WiFi, the further away from the AP you are, the slower the
    connects are. When driving around in the RV, it's hard to get close enuf to
    the AP to get those high speeds.

    While I have a WiFi card, I also have a cell-phone/with tether to my laptop,
    and use the "minutes of use option" to do voice and data combined for about
    $40 a month. That way, it's the best of both. I can use WiFi if I find it,
    but can use the cell if I can't. (did I mention if you have free nights and
    weekends, you can connect for free between 9:01 pm and 6am and all weekend?)


    Bill Lederer wrote:
    > It looks like the Verizon BroadBand thing would be the best. I do have
    > Verizon DSL, at home now.
    >
    > It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    > support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?
    >
    > Also, I see thay sell some sort of hand-held thing to find signals.
    >
    > Bill L
    >
    > On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:50:50 -0500, "Paul"
    > <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >
    >> More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the
    >> lobby areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I
    >> don't know about Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in
    >> the parking lot at ground level, but I'll bet by not being
    >> physically in the lobby you'll get bleed over from the in-room pay
    >> wireless service on the floors above, meaning you could get the free
    >> login screen or be forced to the pay login screen. Typically $9.95 a
    >> day or something like that.
    >>
    >> If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access
    >> service and the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo
    >> unlimited. Speeds vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in
    >> the boonies you'll only get 40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than
    >> nothing.
    >>
    >> -- Paul
    >>
    >>
    >> "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >> news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>> I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >>> from their RV's.
    >>>
    >>> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >>> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that
    >>> works fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL
    >>> modem.
    >>>
    >>> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the
    >>> Web.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>>
    >>> Bill L
  9. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Re the hand held thing, yes there are keychain WiFi detectors. The
    Kensington detector is more widely available but does not get good reviews
    for accuracy. But I googled and found this unit which sounds more
    promising:

    http://www.tomsnetworking.com/Reviews-146-ProdID-SEEKER-1.php

    Of course this is just going to tell you if someone is blaring a WiFi radio
    signal into space, it's not going to automagically tell you if it's a free
    access point or if it's WEP encrypted....

    -- Paul


    "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    news:hstst05471kde643ghlj7sa3e82h3bs4o7@4ax.com...
    > It looks like the Verizon BroadBand thing would be the best. I do have
    > Verizon DSL, at home now.
    >
    > It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    > support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?
    >
    > Also, I see thay sell some sort of hand-held thing to find signals.
    >
    > Bill L
    >
    > On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:50:50 -0500, "Paul"
    > <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >
    >>More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the lobby
    >>areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I don't know
    >>about
    >>Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in the parking lot at
    >>ground
    >>level, but I'll bet by not being physically in the lobby you'll get bleed
    >>over from the in-room pay wireless service on the floors above, meaning
    >>you
    >>could get the free login screen or be forced to the pay login screen.
    >>Typically $9.95 a day or something like that.
    >>
    >>If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access service
    >>and
    >>the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo unlimited. Speeds
    >>vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in the boonies you'll only
    >>get
    >>40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than nothing.
    >>
    >>-- Paul
    >>
    >>
    >>"Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >>news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>>I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >>> from their RV's.
    >>>
    >>> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >>> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that works
    >>> fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL modem.
    >>>
    >>> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the Web.
    >>>
    >>> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>>
    >>> Bill L
    >>
    >
  10. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Alan White <alanwhite@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Many chains now offer free high speed internet. A couple of weeks ago I
    > stayed in Hampton Inns on 2 consecutive nights.
    > First night there was an Ethernet Cable that I plugged in and was instantly
    > connected after punching in the password given me by the front desk.
    > The next night was similar only this time it was wireless. Also needed a
    > password given to me by the front desk. I have a wireless card in my
    > computer. I think they might lend you one if you don't have your own.

    http://www.stayonline.net has a login screen in their client hotels where
    you can elect to subscribe, or chose a two week free trial. That might be
    to avoid long term neighborhood users, or might not actually end after two
    weeks. The signal was very strong in the parking lot at the hotel I
    visited. The card in the room suggested that you needed a wireless adapter
    that they provided for $6.95 per stay, but my wirless card worked just fine.

    If there were free WAPs in the lobby, and pay WAPs in the room, as another
    poster mentioned, I wonder if it would be possible to choose between them
    via Windows or a utility. From the lobby, it must be possible to select
    the free one.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  11. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    I can't use NetScrambler anyway. It doesn't support Windows 98SE.

    Bill

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 11:06:42 -0800, "Peter Pan"
    <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

    >About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    >benefit.. it's FREE. There are a multitude out there that work very very
    >well, but cost about $20.
    >
    >Personally, I use Both Winc (on my laptop) and PocketWinc (on my PDA - an Hp
    >iPAQ with built in Wi-Fi).. at http://www.cirond.com/products.php , Just
    >$19.95, and actually lets you connect your browser to open nodes it finds
    >(rather than just tell you about em like Netstumbler does) (download and try
    >it free for 30 days.. see what you think)
    >
    >While the Verizon Broadband thing is neat, it only works in limited areas,
    >and drops back to NationalAccess speeds in areas that aren't EVDO yet.
    >Unforunately, those areas are usually not outside cities (where most RV
    >parks/places are) (Broadband (requires a Datacard, not a phone, seperate
    >contract about $79 a month) and is about 400-500kb, and NationalAccess (can
    >use a phone OR a datacard) is about 70-90kb connects).
    >
    >One bad part of WiFi, the further away from the AP you are, the slower the
    >connects are. When driving around in the RV, it's hard to get close enuf to
    >the AP to get those high speeds.
    >
    >While I have a WiFi card, I also have a cell-phone/with tether to my laptop,
    >and use the "minutes of use option" to do voice and data combined for about
    >$40 a month. That way, it's the best of both. I can use WiFi if I find it,
    >but can use the cell if I can't. (did I mention if you have free nights and
    >weekends, you can connect for free between 9:01 pm and 6am and all weekend?)
    >
    >
    >Bill Lederer wrote:
    >> It looks like the Verizon BroadBand thing would be the best. I do have
    >> Verizon DSL, at home now.
    >>
    >> It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    >> support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?
    >>
    >> Also, I see thay sell some sort of hand-held thing to find signals.
    >>
    >> Bill L
    >>
    >> On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:50:50 -0500, "Paul"
    >> <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the
    >>> lobby areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I
    >>> don't know about Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in
    >>> the parking lot at ground level, but I'll bet by not being
    >>> physically in the lobby you'll get bleed over from the in-room pay
    >>> wireless service on the floors above, meaning you could get the free
    >>> login screen or be forced to the pay login screen. Typically $9.95 a
    >>> day or something like that.
    >>>
    >>> If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access
    >>> service and the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo
    >>> unlimited. Speeds vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in
    >>> the boonies you'll only get 40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than
    >>> nothing.
    >>>
    >>> -- Paul
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>>> I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >>>> from their RV's.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >>>> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that
    >>>> works fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL
    >>>> modem.
    >>>>
    >>>> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the
    >>>> Web.
    >>>>
    >>>> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>>>
    >>>> Bill L
    >
  12. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Thanks for the tip about Winc, but it doesn't support Windows 98SE
    either. Do you know of any that will?

    Bill L


    On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 11:06:42 -0800, "Peter Pan"
    <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

    >About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    >benefit.. it's FREE. There are a multitude out there that work very very
    >well, but cost about $20.
    >
    >Personally, I use Both Winc (on my laptop) and PocketWinc (on my PDA - an Hp
    >iPAQ with built in Wi-Fi).. at http://www.cirond.com/products.php , Just
    >$19.95, and actually lets you connect your browser to open nodes it finds
    >(rather than just tell you about em like Netstumbler does) (download and try
    >it free for 30 days.. see what you think)
    >
    >While the Verizon Broadband thing is neat, it only works in limited areas,
    >and drops back to NationalAccess speeds in areas that aren't EVDO yet.
    >Unforunately, those areas are usually not outside cities (where most RV
    >parks/places are) (Broadband (requires a Datacard, not a phone, seperate
    >contract about $79 a month) and is about 400-500kb, and NationalAccess (can
    >use a phone OR a datacard) is about 70-90kb connects).
    >
    >One bad part of WiFi, the further away from the AP you are, the slower the
    >connects are. When driving around in the RV, it's hard to get close enuf to
    >the AP to get those high speeds.
    >
    >While I have a WiFi card, I also have a cell-phone/with tether to my laptop,
    >and use the "minutes of use option" to do voice and data combined for about
    >$40 a month. That way, it's the best of both. I can use WiFi if I find it,
    >but can use the cell if I can't. (did I mention if you have free nights and
    >weekends, you can connect for free between 9:01 pm and 6am and all weekend?)
    >
    >
    >Bill Lederer wrote:
    >> It looks like the Verizon BroadBand thing would be the best. I do have
    >> Verizon DSL, at home now.
    >>
    >> It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    >> support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?
    >>
    >> Also, I see thay sell some sort of hand-held thing to find signals.
    >>
    >> Bill L
    >>
    >> On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:50:50 -0500, "Paul"
    >> <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the
    >>> lobby areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I
    >>> don't know about Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in
    >>> the parking lot at ground level, but I'll bet by not being
    >>> physically in the lobby you'll get bleed over from the in-room pay
    >>> wireless service on the floors above, meaning you could get the free
    >>> login screen or be forced to the pay login screen. Typically $9.95 a
    >>> day or something like that.
    >>>
    >>> If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access
    >>> service and the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo
    >>> unlimited. Speeds vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in
    >>> the boonies you'll only get 40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than
    >>> nothing.
    >>>
    >>> -- Paul
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>>> I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >>>> from their RV's.
    >>>>
    >>>> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >>>> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that
    >>>> works fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL
    >>>> modem.
    >>>>
    >>>> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the
    >>>> Web.
    >>>>
    >>>> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>>>
    >>>> Bill L
    >
  13. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Fraid I don't know of any.. But depending on what type of laptop you have,
    check with the manufacturer, they may have OS upgrade kits. (I got em for
    both Toshiba and Dell, but forgot what you have). Seems like almost
    everything these days is mainly XP/2000 compatible.

    PS, that Audiovox PC5220 card that does both BroadBand and National access
    with Verizon
    (http://www.audiovox.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10001&storeId=10001&productId=12526&langId=-1
    ), *IS* Win98SE compatible, as is Mobile Office if you want to do the
    phone/tethered to a laptop thing


    Bill Lederer wrote:
    > Thanks for the tip about Winc, but it doesn't support Windows 98SE
    > either. Do you know of any that will?
    >
    > Bill L
    >
    >
    >
    > On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 11:06:42 -0800, "Peter Pan"
    > <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:
    >
    >> About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    >> benefit.. it's FREE. There are a multitude out there that work very
    >> very well, but cost about $20.
    >>
    >> Personally, I use Both Winc (on my laptop) and PocketWinc (on my PDA
    >> - an Hp iPAQ with built in Wi-Fi).. at
    >> http://www.cirond.com/products.php , Just $19.95, and actually lets
    >> you connect your browser to open nodes it finds (rather than just
    >> tell you about em like Netstumbler does) (download and try it free
    >> for 30 days.. see what you think)
    >>
    >> While the Verizon Broadband thing is neat, it only works in limited
    >> areas, and drops back to NationalAccess speeds in areas that aren't
    >> EVDO yet. Unforunately, those areas are usually not outside cities
    >> (where most RV parks/places are) (Broadband (requires a Datacard,
    >> not a phone, seperate contract about $79 a month) and is about
    >> 400-500kb, and NationalAccess (can use a phone OR a datacard) is
    >> about 70-90kb connects).
    >>
    >> One bad part of WiFi, the further away from the AP you are, the
    >> slower the connects are. When driving around in the RV, it's hard to
    >> get close enuf to the AP to get those high speeds.
    >>
    >> While I have a WiFi card, I also have a cell-phone/with tether to my
    >> laptop, and use the "minutes of use option" to do voice and data
    >> combined for about $40 a month. That way, it's the best of both. I
    >> can use WiFi if I find it, but can use the cell if I can't. (did I
    >> mention if you have free nights and weekends, you can connect for
    >> free between 9:01 pm and 6am and all weekend?)
    >>
    >>
    >> Bill Lederer wrote:
    >>> It looks like the Verizon BroadBand thing would be the best. I do
    >>> have Verizon DSL, at home now.
    >>>
    >>> It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    >>> support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?
    >>>
    >>> Also, I see thay sell some sort of hand-held thing to find signals.
    >>>
    >>> Bill L
    >>>
    >>> On Thu, 6 Jan 2005 19:50:50 -0500, "Paul"
    >>> <paule-nospam@mindspring.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> More hotel chains are offering free wireless internet access in the
    >>>> lobby areas. Sheraton (Starwood) is one chain that does it. I
    >>>> don't know about Residence Inn. So I guess you could get lucky in
    >>>> the parking lot at ground level, but I'll bet by not being
    >>>> physically in the lobby you'll get bleed over from the in-room pay
    >>>> wireless service on the floors above, meaning you could get the
    >>>> free login screen or be forced to the pay login screen. Typically
    >>>> $9.95 a day or something like that.
    >>>>
    >>>> If you want more of a sure thing get Verizon's BroadBand Access
    >>>> service and the PC5220 AirCard for your laptop. Service is $79/mo
    >>>> unlimited. Speeds vary depending on location in the U.S. Out in
    >>>> the boonies you'll only get 40Kb - 100Kb but it's better than
    >>>> nothing.
    >>>>
    >>>> -- Paul
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Bill Lederer" <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >>>> news:ch3rt0t08kkqa3de6j4ultkmkagahdoem4@4ax.com...
    >>>>> I read in the RV forums that people are connecting to the internet
    >>>>> from their RV's.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I have an old Gateway laptop with a Pentium II in it. It is runnig
    >>>>> Windows 98SE. It has a Linksys model WPC11 notebook adapter that
    >>>>> works fine around the house. It goes to a Linksys router to a DSL
    >>>>> modem.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> They say I can pull into a Residence in parking lot and surf the
    >>>>> Web.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Does anyone know how I could do this?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Bill L
  14. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Bill Lederer <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote:
    > It's too bad I can't use that Net Stumbler software. It doesn't
    > support Windows 98SE. Do you know of any others?

    www.boingo.com has a free tool that contains a database of some hotspots,
    and a monitor that will give an audible "boing" when it finds a hotspot.
    that worked on some cards that NetStumbler didn't support. I don't know if
    it works on Win98. They also have a nationwide subscriber network.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  15. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@hotmailnospam.com> wrote:
    > About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one

    Bad? I've seen you post that a few times. It works fine for me, tracks
    hotspots against my GPs for map-plotting later. What do you think is wrong
    with it?

    > While I have a WiFi card, I also have a cell-phone/with tether to my
    > laptop, and use the "minutes of use option" to do voice and data combined
    > for about $40 a month. That way, it's the best of both. I can use WiFi if
    > I find it, but can use the cell if I can't. (did I mention if you have
    > free nights and weekends, you can connect for free between 9:01 pm and
    > 6am and all weekend?)

    That would suffice for my limited needs. I can usually find a WiFi, and I
    pay when I need to, but at $9.95 at an airport to do just a little work,
    the slower standard cellphone would be a good thing. Might be perfect
    for an RV, used only at night, and possibly faster than dialup anyway.

    I had been thinking about the Cingular voice plan, which allows you to add
    unlimited data for $20, and will work via phone. The higher speed "EDGE"
    might require a card. I hadn't thought about that part.

    http://makeashorterlink.com/?K1083122A
    DELL
    TrueMobile 5100 Tri-band GPRS PC Card with T-Mobile Wireless Service
    $134.10
    http://makeashorterlink.com/?E1976122A
    Plan name Price (per month) Internet (GRPS) My E-mail
    T-Mobile Internet $29.99 Unlimited Unlimited
    With T-Mobile WiFi Hotspots $49.99

    Just using "normal" minutes from a phone plan sounds like a good idea.
    Are you just using the phone for as a dialup modem, or do you specifcally
    have an internet access plan that uses voice minutes?

    What phone do you have?
    Sony Ericsson T637 Camera Phone with USB cable?
    That one says "bluetooth compatible". Can a bluetooth adapter on the PC
    be used to access the phone, and thence internet?

    My current phone has infrared, and is supposed to be a dialup modem, but
    that isn't supported by my carrier. I can do AT commands to the modem, but
    I can't dial.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  16. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    dold@XReXXInter.usenet.us.com wrote:
    > Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@hotmailnospam.com> wrote:
    >> About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    >
    > Bad? I've seen you post that a few times. It works fine for me,
    > tracks hotspots against my GPs for map-plotting later. What do you
    > think is wrong with it?
    >

    While I don't have anything against it personally, the fact that it doesn't
    work with certain devices, and doesn't connect with the open hotspots it
    finds, make it a lot less usable/friendly than many other products out there
    but at $20 rather than free.

    Unfortunately, as a computer repair geek, I see an awful lot of customers
    that can't find a hotspot.... Have to tell em it doesn't work with their
    card. arrrghh. drives me nuts when they decide to continue using it even
    though it doesn't work (with their card), cuz it's *free*, and then bitch
    about how bad WiFi is cause theres no hotspots out there.... The ones that
    drive me even crazier, are the ones that get a new card (old one worked, new
    one doesn't), and are convinced that either something is wrong with their
    new card (and want me to FIX IT), or think there are no hotspots out there.

    For someone that knows what they are doing it's fine, but for the large
    majority (that I see), it's bad.
  17. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 13:30:17 -0800, "Peter Pan"
    <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

    >While I don't have anything against it personally, the fact that it doesn't
    >work with certain devices,

    Yeah, well, sorta, maybe. Netstumbler will work with any card on W2K
    or XP that run NDIS 5.1 drivers. See:
    http://www.netstumbler.org/showthread.php?t=10798
    I sometimes have to juggle drivers to get an NDIS 5.1 driver, but
    Netstumbler always works when I'm done. Unfortunately, not all cards
    and USB contraptions have NDIS 5.1 drivers.

    >and doesn't connect with the open hotspots it finds,

    Well, that is a problem but you didn't describe the real(tm) problem.
    Netstumbler works using broadcast probe packets. It can identify an
    access point with just a single responding management packet. That
    makes it quite "sensitive". However, for the same computah to
    actually associate, connect, deliver IP's via DHCP, and start a
    session, requires many more packets to be exchanged. The questions I
    get most are something like "I can see the hot spot with Netstumbler,
    but I can't connect". Duh.

    >make it a lot less usable/friendly than many other products out there
    >but at $20 rather than free.

    $20 is about half the cost of a new Nestumbler compatible card. I
    would buy the new card, sell the old card, and run Netstumbler.

    >Unfortunately, as a computer repair geek, I see an awful lot of customers
    >that can't find a hotspot.

    I usually look for the sign on the door. Maps and lists are also a
    big help. I maintain a local list of free and pay hot spots because
    just about everyone that buys a new laptop with wireless asks for such
    a list. It's just parts of the service.

    >The ones that
    >drive me even crazier, are the ones that get a new card (old one worked, new
    >one doesn't), and are convinced that either something is wrong with their
    >new card (and want me to FIX IT), or think there are no hotspots out there.

    My company motto is "If this stuff worked, you wouldn't need me".
    Such nonsense never bugs me too much.

    >For someone that knows what they are doing it's fine, but for the large
    >majority (that I see), it's bad.

    For those that know, no explanations is necessary. For those that
    don't, no explanation is possible.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  18. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@hotmailnospam.com> wrote:
    > dold@XReXXInter.usenet.us.com wrote:
    >> Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@hotmailnospam.com> wrote:
    >>> About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    >>
    >> Bad? I've seen you post that a few times. It works fine for me,
    >> tracks hotspots against my GPs for map-plotting later. What do you
    >> think is wrong with it?

    > While I don't have anything against it personally, the fact that it doesn't
    > work with certain devices, and doesn't connect with the open hotspots it
    > finds, make it a lot less usable/friendly than many other products out there
    > but at $20 rather than free.

    I looked at the www.cirond.com site.
    I normally wouldn't spend five minutes looking at a site that is so visually
    difficult, but I forged ahead.

    I don't see that Winc does much. It looks like no more than the free tool
    from Boingo.com. Boingo has a list of supported cards, but I think they
    are conservative. i haven't seen it not work with any card.

    NetStumbler is a different tool for a different purpose. I don't see much
    similarity to Winc. The newest version only runs on winXP, but it supports
    a lot more cards, probably "any".

    A public company with a stock price of $0.38... winner.
    $28,000 in revenue? Netstumbler probably did that much.
    At $19.95 to $6995 per product, that's ... how many customers?

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  19. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    OK, let's see if I can net this out. If I upgrade my laptop to XP,
    then I can use Cirond's Winc. Asuming my Linksys WPC11 card works, I
    can pull up outside a place that has free WiFi and connect. I don't
    need their SSID.

    Bill L

    On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 13:30:17 -0800, "Peter Pan"
    <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

    >dold@XReXXInter.usenet.us.com wrote:
    >> Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@hotmailnospam.com> wrote:
    >>> About Netstumbler.. It is a really bad piece of software, but has one
    >>
    >> Bad? I've seen you post that a few times. It works fine for me,
    >> tracks hotspots against my GPs for map-plotting later. What do you
    >> think is wrong with it?
    >>
    >
    >While I don't have anything against it personally, the fact that it doesn't
    >work with certain devices, and doesn't connect with the open hotspots it
    >finds, make it a lot less usable/friendly than many other products out there
    >but at $20 rather than free.
    >
    >Unfortunately, as a computer repair geek, I see an awful lot of customers
    >that can't find a hotspot.... Have to tell em it doesn't work with their
    >card. arrrghh. drives me nuts when they decide to continue using it even
    >though it doesn't work (with their card), cuz it's *free*, and then bitch
    >about how bad WiFi is cause theres no hotspots out there.... The ones that
    >drive me even crazier, are the ones that get a new card (old one worked, new
    >one doesn't), and are convinced that either something is wrong with their
    >new card (and want me to FIX IT), or think there are no hotspots out there.
    >
    >For someone that knows what they are doing it's fine, but for the large
    >majority (that I see), it's bad.
    >
  20. Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

    Bill Lederer <bill.lederer@verizon.net> wrote:
    > Ok, I give up trying to get this old laptop to run. I just ordered a
    > Dell 1150. Hopefully it will be easier to use.

    downside: money.
    upside: New computers work very nicely with WinXP and wireless.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
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