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folder with 2 files takes 30 secs to open

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Anonymous
March 31, 2005 5:01:04 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

I have a folder with 2 .php files in it. When I try to open it, it takes
about 2-30 secs to open it. My computer is locked until it opens. Actually it
happens to all of my folders with php files in them. No other file type or
folder is effected.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

-Derrick
March 31, 2005 11:24:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

try associating the file with notepad instead
"DerrickE" <DerrickE@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:36557CE6-0451-40DA-880A-01630D48E2B7@microsoft.com...
I have a folder with 2 .php files in it. When I try to open it, it takes
about 2-30 secs to open it. My computer is locked until it opens. Actually
it
happens to all of my folders with php files in them. No other file type or
folder is effected.

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

-Derrick
Anonymous
April 1, 2005 1:09:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

They are assossiated with Notepad.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 2:19:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

On Thu, 31 Mar 2005 19:24:04 +0100, "John" <johnnyb_cool@hotmail.com>

>try associating the file with notepad instead

>"DerrickE" <DerrickE@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message

>I have a folder with 2 .php files in it. When I try to open it, it takes
>about 2-30 secs to open it. My computer is locked until it opens. Actually
>it happens to all of my folders with php files in them. No other file type or
>folder is effected.

Welcome to the tedious world of "persistent handlers".

A "persistent handler" is code integrated into Windows Explorer that
fiddles with files of the type(s) that it handles, whenever these are
listed. Yes, you just want to list them without touching the
contents, but the handler digs right in there anyway.

There are three things wrong with this approach...

1) Exceeds risk boundary

Software should not go beyond the risk level the user initiates. Say
the user wants to find a known malware file to delete it, with NO
intention of running it. Here, the code goes ahead and handles the
contents of the file - which increases the exploitable risk surface
exposed to the content of that file. Do I have to spell that out?

2) Slows things down

For example, create a directory, and in that empty directory, create a
few .ZIP files packed with other files. See how long that directory
takes to display - because the persistent handler for .ZIP files is
busy picking through them to count the number of files inside.

3) Breaks on damaged files

Persistent handlers for media file types will search from one end of
the file to the other, if the metadata they seek is not where it's
expected to be (e.g. in a corrupted media file). That's really
tedious when you are dealing with 700M DivX movies, etc.

So, hunt down and beat to death whatever persistent handler is
grabbing .PHP files and "adding value" to listings thereof.



>---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
Gone to bloggery: http://cquirke.blogspot.com
>---------- ----- ---- --- -- - - - -
Anonymous
April 2, 2005 2:19:12 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

Thank you... Although you didn't tell me where to look, you give me a
starting point. I did some research and found they are stored in the registry
and what keys to look for.

I ended up going to regedit and looking through HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT till I
found the PHP extension and then deleting the value set for it. It seems I
installed a program to view php files without putting them on a server. I
didn't like it, so I uninstalled it, but it didn't remove it's values from
the registry.

My folders now load much faster. Hope this helps any1 else
!