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Can you see the difference between 100fps and 120fps?

Last response: in Video Games
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January 4, 2012 3:05:50 AM

I was wondering, can you differentiate between 100fps and 120fps?

I won't hide my feelings on the matter. I feel that people who say that are either imagining things, and/or wannabe elitists.

However, I am humble and willing to alter my viewpoint on that if the evidence warrants.
January 4, 2012 3:12:30 AM

My current monitor is a 1080p monitor with a refresh rate of 75Hz.

I cannot tell a difference between 60fps and 75fps. Even in the fastest paced shooters, such as Quake Live and TF2.

None. What. So. Ever.

Is it just me?

I can tell a difference up until 55-60, and at that point it is all just silky smooth and the same, all the way up to 75.

So you have to understand my reluctance to believe those that say they can tell a difference between 100 and 120 (which is twice the frame rate at which I stop noticing improvement). Are there a bunch of supermen walking around with superhuman eyes? Or am I just one of the (vast majority) unlucky people who cannot see a difference?

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January 4, 2012 6:34:31 AM

An interesting article about the frame rates and human eye here.

Coming back to your question, on my 1080p 60Hz Asus monitor, I can only tell the difference up to 60 FPS or so; from there on, it's just smooth gameplay for me. Of course I can tell when it's going from 60 to 55, or lower, but I am not really sure I can tell the difference between 60 and 80, let's say.

So I guess it's debatable; but, there maybe be more... gifted humans that can perceive finer details, I don't deny that. But again, you will have your group of elitist jerks too, wanna-be-like-Mike type of guys who will tell you black is white and white is black.
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January 4, 2012 7:45:06 AM

Best answer selected by PCgamer81.
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January 4, 2012 7:51:12 AM

Eldd said:
An interesting article about the frame rates and human eye here.

Coming back to your question, on my 1080p 60Hz Asus monitor, I can only tell the difference up to 60 FPS or so; from there on, it's just smooth gameplay for me. Of course I can tell when it's going from 60 to 55, or lower, but I am not really sure I can tell the difference between 60 and 80, let's say.

So I guess it's debatable; but, there maybe be more... gifted humans that can perceive finer details, I don't deny that. But again, you will have your group of elitist jerks too, wanna-be-like-Mike type of guys who will tell you black is white and white is black.


No sense in waiting for other answers, this post is excellent.

You did say that you don't notice an increase past 60, but that is your refresh rate? I thought that regardless of what is rendered, the frames per second will never go above the refresh rate - hence the screen tearing when frames are being rendered faster than the monitor can display them. At least, that is the way I understood it.

I could very easily be wrong.

In any case, awesome post, awesome link, and awesome commentary.
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January 4, 2012 8:05:13 AM

The refresh rate of my monitor is 60Hz; and I think the refresh rate doesn't have much to do with the FPS displayed, and screen tearing is easily fixed by using the v-sync function. As a matter of fact, when using FRAPS to check my FPS, I can see it go way above 60 FPS (60Hz being my refresh rate), and I don't think it'd be displayed so unless my monitor could display it as well.

For games locked at 30 FPS, and here I can name NFS: The Run, and L.A. Noire, whatever I'd try and do, that FPS cannot go higher because the game's supposed to use only that FPS. For instance, when running NFS: The Run, I used highest possible settings, at 1080p, and FPS wouldn't go down below 30 FPS, even on my HD 5770, which is far from a "monster" gaming card, but also, never above.

When I used the frame unlocker for Skyrim, I could actually see my FPS counter go above 60 FPS in certain areas as well. So I think refresh rate has nothing to do with frames displayed per second, at least that's what I've found out on Wikipedia:

"The refresh rate (most commonly the "vertical refresh rate", "vertical scan rate" for CRTs) is the number of times in a second that a display hardware draws the data. This is distinct from the measure of frame rate in that the refresh rate includes the repeated drawing of identical frames, while frame rate measures how often a video source can feed an entire frame of new data to a display."
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January 4, 2012 9:32:15 AM

I don't "see" a difference I "feel" a difference. It's hard to explain but lets say when I get 60 FPS my mouse seems to respond slower and I can't make those flick shots I find myself making at say 120 FPS. If I was watching a movie at 60 FPS and then at 120 FPS I wouldn't know the difference. It's just when I'm moving my mouse around at different framerates in games.
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January 4, 2012 10:08:22 AM

I know what you mean about seeing and feeling. Of course, you can't see anything above 60FPS unless your monitor supports a higher refresh rate.

What's certainly true is that if you have a 120Hz monitor, then you can see the difference between 120Hz and 60Hz in Windows. Dragging around windows is much smoother and nicer.
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