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Multiple Wireless Access Points

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 7:42:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I'm trying to configure multiple WAPs connected to an existing LAN. I want
to have all wireless clients get their IP config from the LAN's Windows 2000
Server (which provides DHCP and DNS server services). What is the best way
to configure the WAPs?
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 11:04:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

wap gateway = LAN ip
wap 1st dns = LAN ip
wap 2nd dns = win2000 Server real www 2nd dns ip

wap ip = fixed ip

"Joe DiGiovanni" <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:uiRPe.2804$rS4.2491@newssvr22.news.prodigy.net...
> I'm trying to configure multiple WAPs connected to an existing LAN. I
> want to have all wireless clients get their IP config from the LAN's
> Windows 2000 Server (which provides DHCP and DNS server services). What
> is the best way to configure the WAPs?
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 12:04:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> I'm trying to configure multiple WAPs connected to an existing LAN. I want
> to have all wireless clients get their IP config from the LAN's Windows 2000
> Server (which provides DHCP and DNS server services). What is the best way
> to configure the WAPs?

Just turn them on, they're a layer 2 bridge so don't care anything about
dhcp or dns.

You don't say how many you're trying to configure or whether you want
roaming or whether they're overlapping.

If you want to roam, configure the same SSID and use channels 1, 6, 11
in a non overlapping fashion.

If you don't want to roam or they don't overlap it doesn't matter.

The access points only need an address for management or communications
with say a RADIUS server but you didn't mention that either so i'll
presume you don't.

David.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 12:07:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> wap gateway = LAN ip
> wap 1st dns = LAN ip
> wap 2nd dns = win2000 Server real www 2nd dns ip

You've lost me there! Do what? Why? The OP mentions access point, not
router so there's no forwarding, no lookups, no routing, no NAT.

> wap ip = fixed ip

For management yes although he could do a DHCP reservation since DHCP is
already present but same effect.

David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 3:29:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I take it by "LAN ip" you mean the Win2K Server's IP addr, since it is the
DNS server?

"bumtracks" <lost@disney.lan> wrote in message
news:CfUPe.1253$__1.850@trnddc07...
> wap gateway = LAN ip
> wap 1st dns = LAN ip
> wap 2nd dns = win2000 Server real www 2nd dns ip
>
> wap ip = fixed ip
>
> "Joe DiGiovanni" <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:uiRPe.2804$rS4.2491@newssvr22.news.prodigy.net...
>> I'm trying to configure multiple WAPs connected to an existing LAN. I
>> want to have all wireless clients get their IP config from the LAN's
>> Windows 2000 Server (which provides DHCP and DNS server services). What
>> is the best way to configure the WAPs?
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 3:35:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

There are 3 WAPs, and they can provide DHCP services. The rooms are close
enough that they all overlap. I do want roaming.

So, it sounds like: same SSID, but unique channels, right?

"David Taylor" <djtaylor@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d7a2f674d2bef66989dc0@news.cable.ntlworld.com...
>> I'm trying to configure multiple WAPs connected to an existing LAN. I
>> want
>> to have all wireless clients get their IP config from the LAN's Windows
>> 2000
>> Server (which provides DHCP and DNS server services). What is the best
>> way
>> to configure the WAPs?
>
> Just turn them on, they're a layer 2 bridge so don't care anything about
> dhcp or dns.
>
> You don't say how many you're trying to configure or whether you want
> roaming or whether they're overlapping.
>
> If you want to roam, configure the same SSID and use channels 1, 6, 11
> in a non overlapping fashion.
>
> If you don't want to roam or they don't overlap it doesn't matter.
>
> The access points only need an address for management or communications
> with say a RADIUS server but you didn't mention that either so i'll
> presume you don't.
>
> David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 3:35:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Joe DiGiovanni" <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:
>There are 3 WAPs, and they can provide DHCP services. The rooms are close
>enough that they all overlap. I do want roaming.
>
>So, it sounds like: same SSID, but unique channels, right?

What WAPs do you have that provide DHCP services? I don't think you
are going to be able to provide seamless roaming(*) thru multiple DHCP
servers...

(*) Look for a recent thread on WAP54G roaming for discussions of
roaming, and why it might not work no matter what you do.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 27, 2005 6:46:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks - indeed I don't want to use the WAP/routers' DHCP services at all.
From your other post, looks like I need to use same channel on all 3 to have
seamless roaming, right? The WEP keys already match (don't think the
devices support WPA - I'm not in front of them to check).


<William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
news:aor0h1hedk3j52nk3gdq212h8un6u2d2h5@4ax.com...
> "Joe DiGiovanni" <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>There are 3 WAPs, and they can provide DHCP services. The rooms are close
>>enough that they all overlap. I do want roaming.
>>
>>So, it sounds like: same SSID, but unique channels, right?
>
> What WAPs do you have that provide DHCP services? I don't think you
> are going to be able to provide seamless roaming(*) thru multiple DHCP
> servers...
>
> (*) Look for a recent thread on WAP54G roaming for discussions of
> roaming, and why it might not work no matter what you do.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 4:09:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 14:46:02 GMT, "Joe DiGiovanni"
<mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Thanks - indeed I don't want to use the WAP/routers' DHCP services at all.
>From your other post, looks like I need to use same channel on all 3 to have
>seamless roaming, right? The WEP keys already match (don't think the
>devices support WPA - I'm not in front of them to check).

No. They can and should be on different non-overlapping channels (1,
6, and 11) but all the same SSID. If they were on the same channel,
and they had overlapping coverage, then they will interfere with each
other. The way it works is that a client radio holds onto a give
access point and channel until it loses signal. It then scans all the
channels (1->11) looking for the same SSID. Some clients are smart
enough to take the strongest (or lowest S/N ratio) channel. Others
are stupid and just take the first channel they blunder across. If
you have overlapping coverage areas, you can see where there might be
a problem.

Otherwise, wait for the IEEE to release 802.11r (fast roaming) which
should work much better.


--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
# http://802.11junk.com
# jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 6:23:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Thanks! I found the WAP can be either configured strictly as an access
point, or as a router. Either way, when I configure it w/ an IP address in
the same subnet as the LAN wired computers, including the Win2K server, I
can connect to the WAP from a wireless client, but the client doesn't get
it's IP from the Win2K DHCP server. Instead, it gets an autoconfig-type
address.

The WAP, when just an access point, only allows me to specify the IP and
subnet mask. When router functions are enabled, I can set WAN IP settings,
including IP addr, subnet mask, DNS server addr.

The Win2K server is 192.168.0.3. The default gateway is 192.168.0.1. The
WAP is 192.168.0.5, and it's DHCP server capability is disabled. The WAP's
DNS is set to 192.168.0.3.

Any ideas why the client isn't getting through to the Win2K DHCP server?

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:1lv1h192t3qg22tie2vb8qocuopll0l560@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 27 Aug 2005 14:46:02 GMT, "Joe DiGiovanni"
> <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>Thanks - indeed I don't want to use the WAP/routers' DHCP services at all.
>>From your other post, looks like I need to use same channel on all 3 to
>>have
>>seamless roaming, right? The WEP keys already match (don't think the
>>devices support WPA - I'm not in front of them to check).
>
> No. They can and should be on different non-overlapping channels (1,
> 6, and 11) but all the same SSID. If they were on the same channel,
> and they had overlapping coverage, then they will interfere with each
> other. The way it works is that a client radio holds onto a give
> access point and channel until it loses signal. It then scans all the
> channels (1->11) looking for the same SSID. Some clients are smart
> enough to take the strongest (or lowest S/N ratio) channel. Others
> are stupid and just take the first channel they blunder across. If
> you have overlapping coverage areas, you can see where there might be
> a problem.
>
> Otherwise, wait for the IEEE to release 802.11r (fast roaming) which
> should work much better.
>
>
> --
> # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
> # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
> # http://802.11junk.com
> # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
> # jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 6:52:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 02:23:20 GMT, "Joe DiGiovanni"
<mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Thanks! I found the WAP can be either configured strictly as an access
>point, or as a router. Either way, when I configure it w/ an IP address in
>the same subnet as the LAN wired computers, including the Win2K server, I
>can connect to the WAP from a wireless client, but the client doesn't get
>it's IP from the Win2K DHCP server. Instead, it gets an autoconfig-type
>address.

Is there some reason you haven't bothered to disclose the maker and
model number of this mystery WAP? By autoconfigurated, I presume it's
169.254.xxx.xxx. (Hint: Numbers, not creative descriptions).

>The WAP, when just an access point, only allows me to specify the IP and
>subnet mask. When router functions are enabled, I can set WAN IP settings,
>including IP addr, subnet mask, DNS server addr.

In the WAP mode, the IP address is only for administration and
configuration and has nothing to do with connectivity. Access points
do bridging and no nothing of IP addresses.

>The Win2K server is 192.168.0.3. The default gateway is 192.168.0.1. The
>WAP is 192.168.0.5, and it's DHCP server capability is disabled. The WAP's
>DNS is set to 192.168.0.3.

You're IP's look fine if the W2K server is acting as a DHCP server and
DNS server. I'll assume that your gateway router is 192.168.0.1. It
*should* work. So do some simple troubleshooting.

>Any ideas why the client isn't getting through to the Win2K DHCP server?

Nope. Can you ping the W2K server from somewhere?

Is there some kind of IP filtering going on at the W2K server (as in
personal firewall)?

Download and play with this free DHCP query thing:
> http://www.weirdsolutions.com/weirdSolutions/files/prod...


--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
# http://802.11junk.com
# jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 11:39:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> There are 3 WAPs, and they can provide DHCP services. The rooms are close
> enough that they all overlap. I do want roaming.
>
> So, it sounds like: same SSID, but unique channels, right?

Access Points don't provide DHCP, you've got a Windows 2000 server that
does that already so again, do nothing, just turn them on.

David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 11:40:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> What WAPs do you have that provide DHCP services? I don't think you
> are going to be able to provide seamless roaming(*) thru multiple DHCP
> servers...

Seamless roaming is only a problem if the IP address changes, there's no
problem if all the AP's are on the same subnet.

David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 11:41:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> Thanks - indeed I don't want to use the WAP/routers' DHCP services at all.

Are they routers or AP's because they're not the same thing.

> From your other post, looks like I need to use same channel on all 3 to have
> seamless roaming, right? The WEP keys already match (don't think the
> devices support WPA - I'm not in front of them to check).

No, different channels, same SSID, same subnet.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 11:45:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> Thanks! I found the WAP can be either configured strictly as an access
> point, or as a router. Either way, when I configure it w/ an IP address in

Would you care to enlighten us as to precisely which brand and model
you're dealing with here?! :)  Because if you can configure your access
point as a router then it's not an access point but a wireless router
and the config is different.

> Any ideas why the client isn't getting through to the Win2K DHCP server?

Right, lets start again.

Configure them/it as an access point and do nothing else. If it's
really working as an access point and isn't a router and there's nothing
else you haven't disclosed then it will be doing layer 2 bridging and
therefore will be bridging packets quite happily between both the wired
and wireless segments.

Clients will then get their addresses from the Windows 2000 server.

David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 4:18:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The devices are Belkin High Speed Mode Wireless G Routers (F5D7231-4). They
can be configured to run in "access point only" mode.

The autoconfig address is a 169.254.x.x (I don't have the exact address
with me - these devices are at my kids' school).

The Win2K server is both DHCP and DNS server. Indeed I thought that by
setting the belkin in "access point" only mode, it would happily pass
packets between the wireless client and wired server.

Are you saying in this mode, the WAP *doesn't* have to have an address in
the same subnet as the wired computers?

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:b892h1p1rd6lr0niohsl5f09jjqtq0vuq4@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 02:23:20 GMT, "Joe DiGiovanni"
> <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>Thanks! I found the WAP can be either configured strictly as an access
>>point, or as a router. Either way, when I configure it w/ an IP address
>>in
>>the same subnet as the LAN wired computers, including the Win2K server, I
>>can connect to the WAP from a wireless client, but the client doesn't get
>>it's IP from the Win2K DHCP server. Instead, it gets an autoconfig-type
>>address.
>
> Is there some reason you haven't bothered to disclose the maker and
> model number of this mystery WAP? By autoconfigurated, I presume it's
> 169.254.xxx.xxx. (Hint: Numbers, not creative descriptions).
>
>>The WAP, when just an access point, only allows me to specify the IP and
>>subnet mask. When router functions are enabled, I can set WAN IP
>>settings,
>>including IP addr, subnet mask, DNS server addr.
>
> In the WAP mode, the IP address is only for administration and
> configuration and has nothing to do with connectivity. Access points
> do bridging and no nothing of IP addresses.
>
>>The Win2K server is 192.168.0.3. The default gateway is 192.168.0.1. The
>>WAP is 192.168.0.5, and it's DHCP server capability is disabled. The
>>WAP's
>>DNS is set to 192.168.0.3.
>
> You're IP's look fine if the W2K server is acting as a DHCP server and
> DNS server. I'll assume that your gateway router is 192.168.0.1. It
> *should* work. So do some simple troubleshooting.
>
>>Any ideas why the client isn't getting through to the Win2K DHCP server?
>
> Nope. Can you ping the W2K server from somewhere?
>
> Is there some kind of IP filtering going on at the W2K server (as in
> personal firewall)?
>
> Download and play with this free DHCP query thing:
>>
>> http://www.weirdsolutions.com/weirdSolutions/files/prod...
>
>
> --
> # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
> # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
> # http://802.11junk.com
> # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
> # jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 4:18:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 12:18:51 GMT, "Joe DiGiovanni"
<mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:

>The devices are Belkin High Speed Mode Wireless G Routers (F5D7231-4). They
>can be configured to run in "access point only" mode.

I'm not sure about that model, but when I tried their "bridge" mode
selection, all control over the wireless settings were lost because
the internal web server was disabled in their bridge mode. It's much
easier to simply:
1. Assign a proper IP address (more on this later)
2. Disable DHCP.
3. Ignore the WAN port connection.
4. Connect to the wired LAN using a LAN port, not the WAN port.
That effectively turns your wireless router into an access point
without losing the web server config.

>The autoconfig address is a 169.254.x.x (I don't have the exact address
>with me - these devices are at my kids' school).

Ok. That means the clients are not connecting to the DHCP server.
One obscure possibility is that I've seen some access points block
broadcasts. This requires buggy firmware to accomplish and I suspect
is NOT the problem here.

Is there some kind of security system running on the W2K server that
would prevent it from recognizing a new computer on the LAN?

Try downloading and using a free DHCP tester:
> http://www.weirdsolutions.com/weirdSolutions/files/prod...
It does NOT require an IP address to be assigned in order to find a
DHCP server and will function with 169.254.xxx.xxx or whatever.

Incidentally, I'm not thrilled with Belkin products in general and
suggest you try an alternative. Almost any wireless router setup as
an access point will work for what you're doing.

>The Win2K server is both DHCP and DNS server. Indeed I thought that by
>setting the belkin in "access point" only mode, it would happily pass
>packets between the wireless client and wired server.

It should. Something is wrong, but I can't tell without sniffing the
traffic to see what's happening. If you feel ambitious, setup
Ethereal for sniffing. Connect a hub (not a switch) between the
access point and the DHCP/DNS server. Filter for DHCP and ARP
packets. If you've never done this before, this is not a trivial
exercise and can best be solved by substitution.

>Are you saying in this mode, the WAP *doesn't* have to have an address in
>the same subnet as the wired computers?

Exactly. However, you have no reason to do this, so I would not.

In the bridge (access point) mode, the only thing that IP address does
is give you access to the device configuration. It can be any IP
address you find useful and has no effect on bridging.

I do this on systems that are short of /24 IP addresses[1] or where I
don't want clients playing with the wireless devices. For example, I
have the DHCP server deliver IP's to the clients using 192.168.1.xxx,
while all the access points and devices are on 192.168.111.xxx. Since
bridging doesn't know anything about IP addresses, as long as my
management computer can be configured to 192.168.111.xxx, I can talk
to the wireless devices. XP and W2K allow multiple aliased IP's on a
single interface so this is really easy. However, in your case, I
don't see any benefit so setting the device and client IP's in the
same /24 network is probably the desired configuration.

Incidentally, if you juggle IP's quite a bit on a laptop management
device, I suggest using:
http://www.NetSwitcher.com
to make it easy. I have something like 30 configurations, one per
customer network, on mine. Yeah, this is a plug.

[1] Whenever I mention running out of /24 IP addresses (253), someone
always remarks that such a large system should be broken up with
VLAN's or subnets to control traffic. That's true. However,
connecting 2 or more remote offices with a VPN will instantly consume
a substantial number of IP's. Each client computah now will have two
IP's. One for the local LAN on one subnet, and one for the VPN on the
remote /24 network. Traffic is controlled by the routers, but the IP
consumption is still substantial.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 4:25:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The devices are Belkin High Speed Mode Wireless G Routers (F5D7231-4). They
can be configured to run in "access point only" mode.

I only got a chance to try the WAP only mode on one Belkin so far. I'm
going to try the others to try to isolate the problem.

"David Taylor" <djtaylor@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1d7b7c00706a4574989dc5@news.cable.ntlworld.com...
>> Thanks! I found the WAP can be either configured strictly as an access
>> point, or as a router. Either way, when I configure it w/ an IP address
>> in
>
> Would you care to enlighten us as to precisely which brand and model
> you're dealing with here?! :)  Because if you can configure your access
> point as a router then it's not an access point but a wireless router
> and the config is different.
>
>> Any ideas why the client isn't getting through to the Win2K DHCP server?
>
> Right, lets start again.
>
> Configure them/it as an access point and do nothing else. If it's
> really working as an access point and isn't a router and there's nothing
> else you haven't disclosed then it will be doing layer 2 bridging and
> therefore will be bridging packets quite happily between both the wired
> and wireless segments.
>
> Clients will then get their addresses from the Windows 2000 server.
>
> David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 4:49:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> The Win2K server is both DHCP and DNS server. Indeed I thought that by
> setting the belkin in "access point" only mode, it would happily pass
> packets between the wireless client and wired server.

It should do, if it isn't it's either not an access point only mode or
you haven't got it configured correctly to be so.

> Are you saying in this mode, the WAP *doesn't* have to have an address in
> the same subnet as the wired computers?

It *only* needs an address for you to manage it.

David.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 6:36:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Joe DiGiovanni" <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:
>Thanks - indeed I don't want to use the WAP/routers' DHCP services at all.

Ah, so they are wireless routers, but you are planning on only using
the AP function of them? [As Jeff would say at this point, is there a
particular reason why you are keeping the manufacturer, model number,
hardware rev, and firmware revision a secret?] If you can turn off
the router functionality this should work just the same as an AP,
though you may have to connect to the LAN port instead of the WAN port
and perform some unknown configuration steps.

>From your other post, looks like I need to use same channel on all 3 to have
>seamless roaming, right? The WEP keys already match (don't think the
>devices support WPA - I'm not in front of them to check).

Well, I've only tried them on the same channel and they seemed to work
fine, but others in this newsgroup have said that you'll want to use
non-overlapping channels, so I can't say for sure. I could try it
easily enough, but not today...
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 8:46:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

William P. N. Smith <> wrote:
>Well, I've only tried them on the same channel and they seemed to work
>fine, but others in this newsgroup have said that you'll want to use
>non-overlapping channels, so I can't say for sure. I could try it
>easily enough, but not today...

I lied, I can do it today. 8*) It seems to make no difference to my
setup (*) whether the APs are on separate channels or common channels,
Ping Plotter will show a momentary interruption in service, but WinAmp
will continue to play an MP3 file off my server (usually) without a
glitch.

Since it makes sense that in a multi-user setup you'd want people to
be able to use separate channels to reduce interference, you probably
want to use the usual three non-overlapping channels: 1,6,11.

(*) Linksys WAP54G V1 (FW V2.07) and V2 (FW V2.08), Dell Latitude
D600 with Intel 2200BG with 9.0.2.25 drivers, WinXP(pro) SP2 with all
the latest patches. WPA-PSK/TKIP. Your milage _will_ vary.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 28, 2005 9:51:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Responses below...Thanks a ton for all your help! -Joe

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:o ok3h1927hp6k5be2jolbsl8s36h4v40cp@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 28 Aug 2005 12:18:51 GMT, "Joe DiGiovanni"
> <mrcpuhead@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>The devices are Belkin High Speed Mode Wireless G Routers (F5D7231-4).
>>They
>>can be configured to run in "access point only" mode.
>
> I'm not sure about that model, but when I tried their "bridge" mode
> selection, all control over the wireless settings were lost because
> the internal web server was disabled in their bridge mode. It's much
> easier to simply:
> 1. Assign a proper IP address (more on this later)
> 2. Disable DHCP.
> 3. Ignore the WAN port connection.
> 4. Connect to the wired LAN using a LAN port, not the WAN port.
> That effectively turns your wireless router into an access point
> without losing the web server config.

Hmmm - I thought about steps #3 & 4, but didn't get around to trying that
yet.

>
>>The autoconfig address is a 169.254.x.x (I don't have the exact address
>>with me - these devices are at my kids' school).
>
> Ok. That means the clients are not connecting to the DHCP server.
> One obscure possibility is that I've seen some access points block
> broadcasts. This requires buggy firmware to accomplish and I suspect
> is NOT the problem here.
>
> Is there some kind of security system running on the W2K server that
> would prevent it from recognizing a new computer on the LAN?
>

No - the W2K DHCP server works fine w/ other network clients.

> Try downloading and using a free DHCP tester:
>>
>> http://www.weirdsolutions.com/weirdSolutions/files/prod...
> It does NOT require an IP address to be assigned in order to find a
> DHCP server and will function with 169.254.xxx.xxx or whatever.
>
I'll do that.

> Incidentally, I'm not thrilled with Belkin products in general and
> suggest you try an alternative. Almost any wireless router setup as
> an access point will work for what you're doing.
>
>>The Win2K server is both DHCP and DNS server. Indeed I thought that by
>>setting the belkin in "access point" only mode, it would happily pass
>>packets between the wireless client and wired server.
>
> It should. Something is wrong, but I can't tell without sniffing the
> traffic to see what's happening. If you feel ambitious, setup
> Ethereal for sniffing. Connect a hub (not a switch) between the
> access point and the DHCP/DNS server. Filter for DHCP and ARP
> packets. If you've never done this before, this is not a trivial
> exercise and can best be solved by substitution.
>
I'm comfortable w/ software sniffers - I'll try that if the suggestion above
fails.

>>Are you saying in this mode, the WAP *doesn't* have to have an address in
>>the same subnet as the wired computers?
>
> Exactly. However, you have no reason to do this, so I would not.
>
> In the bridge (access point) mode, the only thing that IP address does
> is give you access to the device configuration. It can be any IP
> address you find useful and has no effect on bridging.
>
> I do this on systems that are short of /24 IP addresses[1] or where I
> don't want clients playing with the wireless devices. For example, I
> have the DHCP server deliver IP's to the clients using 192.168.1.xxx,
> while all the access points and devices are on 192.168.111.xxx. Since
> bridging doesn't know anything about IP addresses, as long as my
> management computer can be configured to 192.168.111.xxx, I can talk
> to the wireless devices. XP and W2K allow multiple aliased IP's on a
> single interface so this is really easy. However, in your case, I
> don't see any benefit so setting the device and client IP's in the
> same /24 network is probably the desired configuration.
>
> Incidentally, if you juggle IP's quite a bit on a laptop management
> device, I suggest using:
> http://www.NetSwitcher.com
> to make it easy. I have something like 30 configurations, one per
> customer network, on mine. Yeah, this is a plug.
>
> [1] Whenever I mention running out of /24 IP addresses (253), someone
> always remarks that such a large system should be broken up with
> VLAN's or subnets to control traffic. That's true. However,
> connecting 2 or more remote offices with a VPN will instantly consume
> a substantial number of IP's. Each client computah now will have two
> IP's. One for the local LAN on one subnet, and one for the VPN on the
> remote /24 network. Traffic is controlled by the routers, but the IP
> consumption is still substantial.
>
>
> --
> Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
> 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
> Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
> AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
August 29, 2005 3:10:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> I lied, I can do it today. 8*) It seems to make no difference to my
> setup (*) whether the APs are on separate channels or common channels,

It would only make a difference if there was overlap and radio
interference. Possibly because your one laptop is either in one place
or the other, there's very little RF on the other AP when they're on the
same channel.
!