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Extended Network vs. Analog Signal

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Anonymous
January 18, 2005 9:01:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the Analog) ,
is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?

Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that the
"services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited. Does
anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended Network? For
example will your phone ring normally, will voice mail calls register, or
can you send and/or receive text messages. Thanks for any help on this.
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 9:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the Analog) ,
> is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?

--> I'm not sure I understand what you are asking. In general it is better
to
find native signal because all of your features will work. This does not,
however,
mean that Verizon is the strongest signal of available roaming partners.
Your
phone will prefer Verizon even if an extended partner has better coverage
in that particular spot, provided Verizon also has signal there. This is
one of
the reasons you occassionally hear about a Verizon user forcing their phone
to roam. The only overlapping partner here in Oregon is Sprint. I've never
been anywhere in Oregon where Sprint had superior signal to Verizon so
forcing roam isn't to the user's advantage here. (Sprint does have coverage
where Verizon does not, and they are a good roaming partner in that we
at least get digital signal with them, and good battery life that comes with
it.
Other than that, Sprint offers almost no compatible features. Even voice
mail waiting indicator fails when roaming on Sprint in Oregon.)

> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that the
> "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited. Does
> anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended Network? For
> example will your phone ring normally, will voice mail calls register, or
> can you send and/or receive text messages. Thanks for any help on this.

--> Here in Oregon, all bets are off when you roam. The really odd bit is
that
features are lost even when roaming digitally. In fact, the only features
that definitely
work when roaming, even digitally, are ability to place or receive a call.
Features
lost here in Oregon definitely include voicemail waiting indication, SMS
text messaging,
and all data features. Caller ID is hit or miss, but typically works when
roaming
digitally.

Roaming is always roaming in terms of feature loss. The term extended
network
only refers to how the call will be billed. If you are roaming on a
preferred network
partner you will not be billed separately for the call (i.e. it's included
and just billed
as airtime like it would be on Verizon native).

In some areas roaming partners offer better feature consistency. For
example,
where Verizon roams on Alltel, you tend to have much better feature
consistency.
(No Alltel in Oregon unfortunately. Even with Alltel buying western
wireless, they
won't get our Cellular One which is a separate company.)

-Dan
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 9:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Dave M. wrote:
> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the
> Analog) , is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended
> Network"?
>
> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that the
> "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited. Does
> anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended Network? For
> example will your phone ring normally, will voice mail calls
> register, or can you send and/or receive text messages. Thanks for
> any help on this.

Hate to tell you, but all that is guaranteed on both extended and roaming is
voice. Anything else is up to the local service provider.

Voice/data/voice mail/etc is all up to the local service provider. It may or
may not do any of the things you ask about.

Just from my experience, I usually get more features on the extended network
(and it is free on my AC plan), over roaming which always costs per minute,
and may or may not provide any features.

On some phones (like mine), you can set the types of connections.. my home
only/never roam, works on SID's anywhere in the US, so I set mine that way,
never have to worry about roaming charges, but if an emergency, I can change
it to roam and maybe get a signal.
Related resources
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 9:01:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Dave M. wrote:
> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the Analog) ,
> is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?

Non sequitur - Extended Network only refers to how the call is billed. In fact,
there is an area about 2 1/2 hours from where I live which is Extended *and*
analog. :) 

> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that the
> "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited. Does
> anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended Network? For
> example will your phone ring normally, will voice mail calls register, or
> can you send and/or receive text messages. Thanks for any help on this.

Phone will ring normally, but your voice mail indicator and SMS text messaging
may or may not work. Depends on how tightly Verizon's stuff is integrated with
the company whose network you're using. Data calls shouldn't be expected to
work either. In fact, none of the advanced calling features are guaranteed to
work when you're roaming.


--
JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / sjsobol@JustThe.net / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED

"In case anyone was wondering, that big glowing globe above the Victor
Valley is the sun." -Victorville _Daily Press_ on the unusually large
amount of rain the Southland has gotten this winter (January 12th, 2005)
January 18, 2005 9:36:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Dan -

Thanks very much for your informative reply. Where I live/work (SF Bay
Area) , the Verizon signal is pretty strong everywhere, except where I live.
For some reason, I assume because it's a stronger/better signal, my phone
and my wife's and daughter's pick up the PCS Sprint signal from a nearby
tower. So at home, we're limited as you indicated in your post. -
Voice mail indicators do not work and text messaging doesn't function.

If I force roaming, as you mentioned, might that pick-up the Verizon signal
and thereby allow us to get the features we currently lose while at home?
I'm pretty sure when we drive less than 1/4 mile up the hill that our signal
reverts to the Verizon signal. So, it's not like the Verizon tower can be
that far away. I guess I can try to do so and see what happens. If I force
roaming, do you think it'll look for the Verizon signal? What do you think?

Thanks for your help Dan.


"Dan Albrich" <dalbrich@uoregon.edui> wrote in message
news:J8GdncWPxJV1N3HcRVn-pg@comcast.com...
>> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
>> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the Analog)
>> ,
>> is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?
>
> --> I'm not sure I understand what you are asking. In general it is better
> to
> find native signal because all of your features will work. This does not,
> however,
> mean that Verizon is the strongest signal of available roaming partners.
> Your
> phone will prefer Verizon even if an extended partner has better coverage
> in that particular spot, provided Verizon also has signal there. This is
> one of
> the reasons you occassionally hear about a Verizon user forcing their
> phone
> to roam. The only overlapping partner here in Oregon is Sprint. I've
> never
> been anywhere in Oregon where Sprint had superior signal to Verizon so
> forcing roam isn't to the user's advantage here. (Sprint does have
> coverage
> where Verizon does not, and they are a good roaming partner in that we
> at least get digital signal with them, and good battery life that comes
> with it.
> Other than that, Sprint offers almost no compatible features. Even voice
> mail waiting indicator fails when roaming on Sprint in Oregon.)
>
>> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that the
>> "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited. Does
>> anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended Network? For
>> example will your phone ring normally, will voice mail calls register, or
>> can you send and/or receive text messages. Thanks for any help on
>> this.
>
> --> Here in Oregon, all bets are off when you roam. The really odd bit is
> that
> features are lost even when roaming digitally. In fact, the only features
> that definitely
> work when roaming, even digitally, are ability to place or receive a call.
> Features
> lost here in Oregon definitely include voicemail waiting indication, SMS
> text messaging,
> and all data features. Caller ID is hit or miss, but typically works when
> roaming
> digitally.
>
> Roaming is always roaming in terms of feature loss. The term extended
> network
> only refers to how the call will be billed. If you are roaming on a
> preferred network
> partner you will not be billed separately for the call (i.e. it's included
> and just billed
> as airtime like it would be on Verizon native).
>
> In some areas roaming partners offer better feature consistency. For
> example,
> where Verizon roams on Alltel, you tend to have much better feature
> consistency.
> (No Alltel in Oregon unfortunately. Even with Alltel buying western
> wireless, they
> won't get our Cellular One which is a separate company.)
>
> -Dan
>
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 9:36:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Actually, probably not...
But if it is only at your home, and you're testing, try setting your handset
to "HOME ONLY". If your home SID is at your home, then it will only look for
a home SID.. Hey what the heck, it's easy and free to try....



Uni wrote:
> Dan -
>
> Thanks very much for your informative reply. Where I live/work (SF
> Bay Area) , the Verizon signal is pretty strong everywhere, except
> where I live. For some reason, I assume because it's a
> stronger/better signal, my phone and my wife's and daughter's pick up
> the PCS Sprint signal from a nearby tower. So at home, we're
> limited as you indicated in your post. - Voice mail indicators do not
> work and text messaging doesn't function.
>
> If I force roaming, as you mentioned, might that pick-up the Verizon
> signal and thereby allow us to get the features we currently lose
> while at home? I'm pretty sure when we drive less than 1/4 mile up
> the hill that our signal reverts to the Verizon signal. So, it's not
> like the Verizon tower can be that far away. I guess I can try to do
> so and see what happens. If I force roaming, do you think it'll look
> for the Verizon signal? What do you think?
> Thanks for your help Dan.
>
>
> "Dan Albrich" <dalbrich@uoregon.edui> wrote in message
> news:J8GdncWPxJV1N3HcRVn-pg@comcast.com...
>>> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
>>> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the
>>> Analog) ,
>>> is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?
>>
>> --> I'm not sure I understand what you are asking. In general it is
>> better to
>> find native signal because all of your features will work. This does
>> not, however,
>> mean that Verizon is the strongest signal of available roaming
>> partners. Your
>> phone will prefer Verizon even if an extended partner has better
>> coverage in that particular spot, provided Verizon also has signal
>> there. This is one of
>> the reasons you occassionally hear about a Verizon user forcing their
>> phone
>> to roam. The only overlapping partner here in Oregon is Sprint. I've
>> never
>> been anywhere in Oregon where Sprint had superior signal to Verizon
>> so forcing roam isn't to the user's advantage here. (Sprint does
>> have coverage
>> where Verizon does not, and they are a good roaming partner in that
>> we at least get digital signal with them, and good battery life that
>> comes with it.
>> Other than that, Sprint offers almost no compatible features. Even
>> voice mail waiting indicator fails when roaming on Sprint in Oregon.)
>>
>>> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that
>>> the "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited.
>>> Does anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended
>>> Network? For example will your phone ring normally, will voice
>>> mail calls register, or can you send and/or receive text messages.
>>> Thanks for any help on this.
>>
>> --> Here in Oregon, all bets are off when you roam. The really odd
>> bit is that
>> features are lost even when roaming digitally. In fact, the only
>> features that definitely
>> work when roaming, even digitally, are ability to place or receive a
>> call. Features
>> lost here in Oregon definitely include voicemail waiting indication,
>> SMS text messaging,
>> and all data features. Caller ID is hit or miss, but typically
>> works when roaming
>> digitally.
>>
>> Roaming is always roaming in terms of feature loss. The term
>> extended network
>> only refers to how the call will be billed. If you are roaming on a
>> preferred network
>> partner you will not be billed separately for the call (i.e. it's
>> included and just billed
>> as airtime like it would be on Verizon native).
>>
>> In some areas roaming partners offer better feature consistency. For
>> example,
>> where Verizon roams on Alltel, you tend to have much better feature
>> consistency.
>> (No Alltel in Oregon unfortunately. Even with Alltel buying western
>> wireless, they
>> won't get our Cellular One which is a separate company.)
>>
>> -Dan
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 10:16:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Steve & Peter - Thanks for your replies. I got lost when SID was
mentioned. I researched it, & found it means System I.D.; not sure if I
need to know anything more about it than that.

When at home, my phone signal goes to Extended Network, and since my phone
is only digital, I'm picking up a digital signal from SPCS. I checked my
phone settings and it gives me the choices of: Home Only, Automatic A and
Automatic B. So, if I wanted to experiment to get a Verizon signal, rather
than a SPCS signal, which one would I pick. The phone is currently set-up
for Automatic B. Thanks again for any help.



"Steve Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message
news:csibn8$rqm$1@ratbert.glorb.com...
> Dave M. wrote:
>> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
>> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the Analog)
>> ,
>> is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?
>
> Non sequitur - Extended Network only refers to how the call is billed. In
> fact, there is an area about 2 1/2 hours from where I live which is
> Extended *and* analog. :) 
>
>> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that the
>> "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited. Does
>> anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended Network? For
>> example will your phone ring normally, will voice mail calls register, or
>> can you send and/or receive text messages. Thanks for any help on
>> this.
>
> Phone will ring normally, but your voice mail indicator and SMS text
> messaging may or may not work. Depends on how tightly Verizon's stuff is
> integrated with the company whose network you're using. Data calls
> shouldn't be expected to work either. In fact, none of the advanced
> calling features are guaranteed to work when you're roaming.
>
>
> --
> JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
> Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / sjsobol@JustThe.net / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED
>
> "In case anyone was wondering, that big glowing globe above the Victor
> Valley is the sun." -Victorville _Daily Press_ on the unusually large
> amount of rain the Southland has gotten this winter (January 12th, 2005)
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 10:16:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Again, it depends on your location (in different areas things work
differently). A and B usually aren't used anymore, but try Home only... Heck
try em all.. what do you have to lose if you don't make a call?

(usually, but not always, the SID is unique.. however there are areas where
multiple providers provide service in the same SID.. oy...)


Dave M. wrote:
> Steve & Peter - Thanks for your replies. I got lost when SID was
> mentioned. I researched it, & found it means System I.D.; not sure
> if I need to know anything more about it than that.
>
> When at home, my phone signal goes to Extended Network, and since my
> phone is only digital, I'm picking up a digital signal from SPCS. I
> checked my phone settings and it gives me the choices of: Home Only,
> Automatic A and Automatic B. So, if I wanted to experiment to get a
> Verizon signal, rather than a SPCS signal, which one would I pick. The
> phone is currently set-up for Automatic B. Thanks again for any
> help.
>
>
> "Steve Sobol" <sjsobol@JustThe.net> wrote in message
> news:csibn8$rqm$1@ratbert.glorb.com...
>> Dave M. wrote:
>>> If you have a choice of having a tri-mode phone pick-up a signal on
>>> 'Extended Network" or pick-up an analog signal (i.e., force the
>>> Analog) ,
>>> is it always going to be better to choose the "Extended Network"?
>>
>> Non sequitur - Extended Network only refers to how the call is
>> billed. In fact, there is an area about 2 1/2 hours from where I
>> live which is Extended *and* analog. :) 
>>
>>> Also, I read on Verizon's website as well as in other places, that
>>> the "services available" on an Extended Network are/can be limited.
>>> Does anyone know exactly what you lose being on the Extended
>>> Network? For example will your phone ring normally, will voice
>>> mail calls register, or can you send and/or receive text messages.
>>> Thanks for any help on this.
>>
>> Phone will ring normally, but your voice mail indicator and SMS text
>> messaging may or may not work. Depends on how tightly Verizon's
>> stuff is integrated with the company whose network you're using.
>> Data calls shouldn't be expected to work either. In fact, none of
>> the advanced calling features are guaranteed to work when you're
>> roaming. --
>> JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET
>> (4638) Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / sjsobol@JustThe.net / PGP:
>> 0xE3AE35ED "In case anyone was wondering, that big glowing globe above
>> the
>> Victor Valley is the sun." -Victorville _Daily Press_ on the
>> unusually large amount of rain the Southland has gotten this winter
>> (January 12th, 2005)
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 10:33:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

>
> When at home, my phone signal goes to Extended Network, and since my
phone
> is only digital, I'm picking up a digital signal from SPCS. I
checked my
> phone settings and it gives me the choices of: Home Only, Automatic
A and
> Automatic B. So, if I wanted to experiment to get a Verizon signal,
rather
> than a SPCS signal, which one would I pick. The phone is currently
set-up
> for Automatic B. Thanks again for any help.
>

System ID is a number assigned to different cellular companies to
uniquely identify their network. They are assigned per cell company
per region.

You can tell your phone to look for a specific SID, which is a way of
forcing it to use a specific network. But in your case there is an
easier way...

The settings you asked about are:
Home Only = use only the Home SID (Verizon's SID for your home region)
Automatic A = first try the Home SID, then try the PRL (a
Verizon-programmed SID-preference list), then try the A channel.
Automatic B = first try the Home SID, then try the PRL (a
Verizon-programmed SID-preference list), then try the B channel.

In your case, forcing Verizon would be as simple as choosing Home Only.
However, since your phone would always try the Home SID first before
Sprint (which is on the PRL), you probably have no Verizon signal at
all in your home.

-MVL
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 1:46:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

>... choices of: Home Only, Automatic A and Automatic B.

Hello again Dave-

Yes, those are the configuration options. The only one that applies in this
case is "Home Only" which should force Verizon if available (as others have
mentioned). Anyway, give it a go. If that leaves the phone "searching..."
and with no available signal then you really have no recourse but to choose
one of the automatic settings (which are functionally equivelent in this
case).

It's funny, aside from the feature loss, what you have is what most people
want. Despite the roaming at home, your phones have usable signal
everywhere you mention. The thing I typically see is someone with the
opposit problem of a weak Verizon signal being preferred over a stronger
roaming signal in a particular spot. The person then wants to force roaming
in that specific location so that they effectively have more usable signal
everywhere, even with the feature loss.

If you're still in the trial period, this problem you describe is actually a
reason to quit your service as there may be nothing you can do to "fix" it.
If another carrier works good at home (i.e. Sprint) maybe they'll work OK
elsewhere too. Sprint has its own good and bad, but they obviously work
well for you at home. Note too that they have a $5/month option to get a
generous roaming allotment (up to %50 of all your usage).

One cool thing with Verizon is that their mobile to mobile now works even
when one of the phones is roaming, provided it's on an extended roaming
partner. i.e. Calls between your family phones or other Verizon customers
don't even get billed as airtime. This effectively gives you unlimited
minutes between family members.

Anyway, yes, you may want to try one or more different carries and see if
someone else can do better for your situation.

Best regards,

-Dan
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 10:59:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Dan & Others:

Thanks for all your replies. Dan, you make a good point. At least I have
a pretty good signal in my house. As I recall, when I was on AT&T, I wasn't
able to get a signal in my house at all. I believe that was the old TDMA
system though.

So, I've tried out all 3 of my choices: If I put it it on "Home Only", I
might initially get 1 bar or so of a signal, but soon thereafter it goes to
no reception at all. Funny enough, Automatic A & Automatic B give me the
same result. It shows "extended network". And then it shows anywhere from
3 bars to a full 5 bars of reception. So I guess I better do as the
Verizon office told me and leave it on "Automatic B".

My Verizon sales rep. said that I should be able to get voice mail
notifications and be able to use text messaging even though I'm in an
"extended network" area. She said she was able to do so when traveling back
east recently. So, I had my daughter send me a text message from our home
today and it was sent fine (I was in a Verizon reception area at the time.).
Btw, she's the only one that uses the text messaging (freshman in high
school) in our family. My wife and I don't normally use text messaging.
So, next we'll see if when one of her friends text messages her while she's
at home, she's able to receive the message.

Like you said Dan, the most important thing is to be able to make and
receive a call. And frankly, it's really only important to receive a call,
since we'll almost always use a land line when dialing out. Thanks for all
your suggestions.

"Dan Albrich" <dalbrich@uoregon.edui> wrote in message
news:p IidnVymTs_Wn3PcRVn-ow@comcast.com...
> >... choices of: Home Only, Automatic A and Automatic B.
>
> Hello again Dave-
>
> Yes, those are the configuration options. The only one that applies in
> this case is "Home Only" which should force Verizon if available (as
> others have mentioned). Anyway, give it a go. If that leaves the phone
> "searching..." and with no available signal then you really have no
> recourse but to choose one of the automatic settings (which are
> functionally equivelent in this case).
>
> It's funny, aside from the feature loss, what you have is what most people
> want. Despite the roaming at home, your phones have usable signal
> everywhere you mention. The thing I typically see is someone with the
> opposit problem of a weak Verizon signal being preferred over a stronger
> roaming signal in a particular spot. The person then wants to force
> roaming in that specific location so that they effectively have more
> usable signal everywhere, even with the feature loss.
>
> If you're still in the trial period, this problem you describe is actually
> a reason to quit your service as there may be nothing you can do to "fix"
> it. If another carrier works good at home (i.e. Sprint) maybe they'll work
> OK elsewhere too. Sprint has its own good and bad, but they obviously
> work well for you at home. Note too that they have a $5/month option to
> get a generous roaming allotment (up to %50 of all your usage).
>
> One cool thing with Verizon is that their mobile to mobile now works even
> when one of the phones is roaming, provided it's on an extended roaming
> partner. i.e. Calls between your family phones or other Verizon customers
> don't even get billed as airtime. This effectively gives you unlimited
> minutes between family members.
>
> Anyway, yes, you may want to try one or more different carries and see if
> someone else can do better for your situation.
>
> Best regards,
>
> -Dan
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 1:51:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Some additional thoughts...

This lack of features issue when roaming used to drive me nuts. I had a
GSM/analog (Nokia 5190 with the sleeve) phone first, then TDMA/analog
(several, mainly Nokia 8260). Both had completely seemless roaming.
Literally every feature worked when roaming same as the home area. The only
time I had seen feature discrepency was when I was roaming in analog mode.
Anyway, I assumed that as long as I had digital singnal, even when roaming,
that features would work period.

Anyway, got with Verizon and discovered virtually all of my "extended"
features fail when I roam in my home state regardless of digitial signal or
analog. This was a bit of a shock at first. For some time Sprint was
preferred roaming partner, and didn't even deliver caller ID information
although that specific problem was fixed about 1 year into them being
preferred. While I continue to lack message waiting indication, I do at
least receive caller ID. i.e. If I see I missed a call, I can at least
check my voicemail to see if one was left.

Anyway, over the past few years with Verizon I've found their quality of
service where they have service to be very good.

The "other factors" that favor Verizon are:
- Quality of coverage where they have coverage has been very good for my
travel patterns. Mostly I use my phone in my home town of Eugene, where
Verizon arguably has the best coverage of any competitor at least in-town.
I've also witnessed improvements (new towers) more so than with the carriers
I used prior to them.
- I very rarely receive any type of capacity issue. My AT&T phone would
routinely get the all circuits busy during peak times (this is still an
issue for Cingular here in Eugene and Portland too, and it seems as if the
AT&T/Cingular network has seen zero improvement for years).
- Price and feature balance. They don't have the best geographic coverage
in my state, however, they come close to the best with included roaming
partners, and as you note, you can actually place and receive calls when
roaming-- which really is the most important bit. While it's technically
possible for a Verizon AC user to roam in Oregon, it's highly unlikely at
this point as virtually all available roaming partners are included as
extended network.
- You can tether your cell phone to your laptop, and use data for the cost
of minutes. See http://cell.uoregon.edu/verizon/data/ for more information.
- Basically, they seem to have a very high quality of service.
- I will admit that it seems like virtually everyone else has a better, and
lower-cost phone selection. In some cases the competition has more minutes
for the same money, or cool options that Verizon does not. CDMA phones
(even all digital handsets) tend to be larger on average than their GSM
counterparts and get worse battery life.
- Verizon has the best customer service of any of the carriers I've used
hands down. I've never waited more than a minute or two to talk to someone.
While I have had to work at times to get issues resolved, they actually have
come through for me repeatedly.
- I hope they continue with the quality of service they have now.
Anonymous
January 20, 2005 10:20:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Yeah, I like the ability to hook my laptop up to my 4500. It's pretty cool
and easy. I've used mapquest.com when I need to locate an address or
whatever when out in the field. It's very convenient. And as you said,
just for the cost of your minutes. While my weekend and night minutes are
not unlimited, I know I have a huge number that I'll never use up.

Another thing I've noticed at home while trying to learn about the "extended
service" and such is that my phone will very frequently go from "Home Base -
Verizon signal" to the Extended network Signal. It's normally on the
Extended Network, but I'm guessing the intermittent connection to the
Verizon towers may trigger any voice mail messages, should I have any. All
in all, it's probably the best of both worlds.


"Dan Albrich" <dalbrich@uoregon.edui> wrote in message
news:KPudnbN_GdN9yXLcRVn-vA@comcast.com...
> Some additional thoughts...
>
> This lack of features issue when roaming used to drive me nuts. I had a
> GSM/analog (Nokia 5190 with the sleeve) phone first, then TDMA/analog
> (several, mainly Nokia 8260). Both had completely seemless roaming.
> Literally every feature worked when roaming same as the home area. The
> only time I had seen feature discrepency was when I was roaming in analog
> mode. Anyway, I assumed that as long as I had digital singnal, even when
> roaming, that features would work period.
>
> Anyway, got with Verizon and discovered virtually all of my "extended"
> features fail when I roam in my home state regardless of digitial signal
> or analog. This was a bit of a shock at first. For some time Sprint was
> preferred roaming partner, and didn't even deliver caller ID information
> although that specific problem was fixed about 1 year into them being
> preferred. While I continue to lack message waiting indication, I do at
> least receive caller ID. i.e. If I see I missed a call, I can at least
> check my voicemail to see if one was left.
>
> Anyway, over the past few years with Verizon I've found their quality of
> service where they have service to be very good.
>
> The "other factors" that favor Verizon are:
> - Quality of coverage where they have coverage has been very good for my
> travel patterns. Mostly I use my phone in my home town of Eugene, where
> Verizon arguably has the best coverage of any competitor at least in-town.
> I've also witnessed improvements (new towers) more so than with the
> carriers I used prior to them.
> - I very rarely receive any type of capacity issue. My AT&T phone would
> routinely get the all circuits busy during peak times (this is still an
> issue for Cingular here in Eugene and Portland too, and it seems as if the
> AT&T/Cingular network has seen zero improvement for years).
> - Price and feature balance. They don't have the best geographic coverage
> in my state, however, they come close to the best with included roaming
> partners, and as you note, you can actually place and receive calls when
> roaming-- which really is the most important bit. While it's technically
> possible for a Verizon AC user to roam in Oregon, it's highly unlikely at
> this point as virtually all available roaming partners are included as
> extended network.
> - You can tether your cell phone to your laptop, and use data for the cost
> of minutes. See http://cell.uoregon.edu/verizon/data/ for more
> information.
> - Basically, they seem to have a very high quality of service.
> - I will admit that it seems like virtually everyone else has a better,
> and lower-cost phone selection. In some cases the competition has more
> minutes for the same money, or cool options that Verizon does not. CDMA
> phones (even all digital handsets) tend to be larger on average than their
> GSM counterparts and get worse battery life.
> - Verizon has the best customer service of any of the carriers I've used
> hands down. I've never waited more than a minute or two to talk to
> someone. While I have had to work at times to get issues resolved, they
> actually have come through for me repeatedly.
> - I hope they continue with the quality of service they have now.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
!