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Network Cards Fighting

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October 30, 2002 11:30:07 PM

Ok here is my situation as a week ago. I had a standard 10 Megabit network with BNC Cable between 3 machines and sometimes up to 10 if I have visitors over. (Now myself I only have 3 so I wil concentrate on those.) I have 2 Athlons that I use for main work running Windows XP Pro SP1. Now I wanted 100 Megabit JUST between those 2 machines because I am usualy transferring a lot of files between them with microsoft filesharing and I wanted the standard 10 megabit BNC left in place without dirturbing it for the lan parties. Ok I got mysef a couple on intel 100 pro network cards and a crossover cable and plugged them in. Now all microsoft networking between these 2 machines stopped. They could ping each other over the 100MBps network cards though not the 10MBps. Fine I decided to start from scratch. I set the 2 machines up like this. Machine 1: 10MBps Card IP address 192.168.0.123 Subnet 255.255.255.0 (have also tried 255.255.0.0 but no diference) 100MBps Card IP Address 192.168.0.133 subnet 255.255.255.0. Machine 2: 10Mbps Card IP address 192.168.0.124 subnet 255.255.255.0 100MBps Card IP address 192.168.0.134 subnet 255.255.255.0. Now I did get it working after a while with these settings but scanning the network to try and connect to each other was really really slow. Once they were connected to each other they worked at the full 100MBps but network scaning was still slow. NOTE I did not have access to the 3rd machine to do tests outside of these 2 machines, I tried removing the 10MBps cards from the machines and it works really really fast on everything. Just unplugging the leads from the 10MBps cards make no difference though. Now I am not trying to get a shared bandwidth between the 2 cards thingy going here so dont think that. I AM NOT TRYING TO GET 110MBps. What I want is for the 2 machines to be hooked together by the 100MBps network BUT to also be hooked together by the 10MBps. I dont care if they can see each other on the 10MBps as long as all the other machines can see them and they can see the rest of the network. You follow me? If you dont I will explain again. 3 machines hooked by 10MBps. 3rd needs to see the other 2 and the other 2 needs to see 3. But the other 2 must not be able to see each other across the 10MBps because of the 100MBps link between them. Is that possible? Or is there a proper way of doing this. Any suggestions on how it should be set up would be greatly appreciated. BTW I am NOT using DHCP. All my IP address are manualy set by me because of some of the things I have running on the network it wont work any other way. thanks for any help.
AREA_1

More about : network cards fighting

October 31, 2002 4:51:18 AM

im not too sure what your trying to accomplish here, it sounds like your doing every thing the hard way. you can get another 100base card and a hub for 25 bucks.

how do you shoot the devil in the back? what happens if you miss? -verbal
October 31, 2002 7:58:18 AM

I agree, buy a new card

both cards on the same network on the same pc isnt a good idea at all.

If they squeeze olives to get olive oil, how do they get baby oil?
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October 31, 2002 9:06:46 AM

That is not an option. I NEED the 10megabit network intact for the BNC conections. To upgrade everyone it would cost me close to $1000 AUD for a 16 port hub then another 10 network cards and a PCMCIA card for my laptop to upgrade from the BNC. Need another solution. AREA_51
October 31, 2002 9:33:11 AM

fair enough!

how about trying your 2 pc's on a different subnet?

If they squeeze olives to get olive oil, how do they get baby oil?
October 31, 2002 10:31:21 AM

I did try that. Still didnt make any difference. Sigh. Maybe I can just have 2 cards in one machine and bridge the connections.
Thanks anyway, If anyone else still has suggestions I would appreciate it.
AREA_51
October 31, 2002 11:07:50 AM

your problem is that you've got both LANS using the same subnet. Make different subnets for each. Like this:

10MB LAN: 192.168.0.XXX Mask: 255.255.255.0
100MB LAN: 192.168.1.XXX Mask 255.255.255.0

The 255.255.255.0 part is not the subnet, it's the mask. Changing it from 255.255.255.0 to 255.255.0.0 doesn't change the subnet. Changing the 0 to a 1 in the 3rd octet gives you a new subnet in a class C address. That should fix your problem.

<i>It's always the one thing you never suspected.</i>
November 1, 2002 8:36:16 AM

That fixed it. It is working perfectly now. Using the 100Megabit for file sharing and the internet connection sharing and games are using the 10megabit just as I wanted in the beginning. Thanks a lot. I realy appreciate it.
AREA_51
November 1, 2002 9:09:03 AM

no problem. I understand your confusion. netmasks/subnets are the most difficult thing to master when you're learning TCP/IP. I had to go over it many times before I grasped the entire concept. Glad to be of assistance.

<i>It's always the one thing you never suspected.</i>
November 1, 2002 9:22:20 AM

im sure I mentioned that the other day and you said you had already done it?

If they squeeze olives to get olive oil, how do they get baby oil?
November 1, 2002 9:34:52 AM

It seems I didnt understand properly what a subnet is. What I did with the subnet setting is change 255.255.255.0 to 255.255.0.0 and I thought that changed it. I am a bit too used to the old novell 3.12 IPX networks. You didnt have all that crap. So it turns out I didnt know that in reality I had not changed the subnet. Anyway. There it is.
Thanks
AREA_51
November 1, 2002 10:00:21 AM

ahhh right, that makes sense. Glad you sorted it anyway



If they squeeze olives to get olive oil, how do they get baby oil?
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