Moving XP to New Hard Drive on Same Computer

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

I have a Dell Dimension 8200 with a Pentium 4, 1.8 GHz. A while back, I
installed a new ~75GB hard drive as the secondary drive (slave is the term,
right?). Based on the fact that this is a newer drive, and on my own
experience using the computer, I'm pretty sure the new drive is a lot faster
than the original one.

I'd like to make the best use of this additional speed, and was thinking
about moving Windows and most of my program files to it. The older, 40GB
drive could then be used for backup/archives.

I've done some initial searches, both here and on MS's knowledge base, but
couldn't find instructions for doing what I want to do. Also review
www.michaelstevenstech.com, found the Move XP section, but still didn't seem
like an exact match.

My preference is not to reinstall everything if I can, but I know it's not
just a simple matter of moving files. Can anyone point me to instructions
for doing what I want to do?

Thanks,
Todd
3 answers Last reply
More about moving hard drive computer
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    Probably, the best way to go would be to image your old drive since it
    seems to be working nicely and place that image
    on the new drive. Programs such as Acronis True Image and Ghost do that.
    I would also check at the manufacturers website of the newer hard drive.
    They may have a free App to do that also.
    "T. Jenkins" <TJenkins@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:849B23FD-A65D-4717-AE64-51C831A66F6F@microsoft.com...
    >I have a Dell Dimension 8200 with a Pentium 4, 1.8 GHz. A while back, I
    > installed a new ~75GB hard drive as the secondary drive (slave is the
    > term,
    > right?). Based on the fact that this is a newer drive, and on my own
    > experience using the computer, I'm pretty sure the new drive is a lot
    > faster
    > than the original one.
    >
    > I'd like to make the best use of this additional speed, and was thinking
    > about moving Windows and most of my program files to it. The older, 40GB
    > drive could then be used for backup/archives.
    >
    > I've done some initial searches, both here and on MS's knowledge base, but
    > couldn't find instructions for doing what I want to do. Also review
    > www.michaelstevenstech.com, found the Move XP section, but still didn't
    > seem
    > like an exact match.
    >
    > My preference is not to reinstall everything if I can, but I know it's not
    > just a simple matter of moving files. Can anyone point me to instructions
    > for doing what I want to do?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Todd
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    Hello, Jenkins!
    I would recommend you to use Acronis True
    Image[http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage]. I've
    been using it for a long time, first to megrate my OS from one HDD onto
    another, but now I use it as backup purpose.
    So, this software has graete intuitive windows wizard, that it will be
    very easy to do move your OS.
    First of all install True Image>than craete a "disk clone", and now you
    may choose: at once restore clone onto new HDD(slave) or make a
    bootable CD.
    It'll take you about 20-30 min, and it's really reliable way.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.perform_maintain (More info?)

    Cloning the old HD to the new is easy, as there are probably thousands of
    prgrams for that..
    Like this: http://www.miray.de/download/sat.hdclone.html or from the new
    disk manufacturer's homepages

    When you have the cloning program installed on a floppy, your old HD as
    master and new HD as slave, boot from the floppy and, following
    instructions, copy old HD -> new HD. (Some progs allow for changing
    partition sizes as part of the process)

    When copied, power down, disconnect both drives, jumper new disk as master,
    connect it, DON'T connect old disk!!; boot and check that everything is
    working.
    If so, NOW you can jumper old disk as slave, connect it, re-partition/format
    (DiskManager, diskmgmt.msc) and use...


    Text below is by Rick Rogers, replace Ghost2003 with any suitable program:
    USING GHOST 2003 TO CLONE AN INTERNAL HARD DRIVE TO A NOTHER HARD
    DRIVE

    1. Open your desktop computer case and disconnect the IDE ribbon cable from
    the hard drive that you will NOT be cloning from. Connect that cable to the
    hard drive that you will be cloning to. Naturally that drive will be outside
    your computer case so you'll have to prop it up in some fashion in order
    that the ribbon cable (and power plug) will reach it. Depending on the size
    of the computer case and/or cable length, sometimes you're able to lay the
    drive on top of the case on a piece of foam or cardboard. Other times you
    can place a cardboard box (or something similar) adjacent to the computer
    case and cable connection on which to lay the drive. Handle the drive with
    care, holding it by its sides. Avoid touching the electronics panel on the
    bottom of the drive. Connect a free Molex power plug to the drive if one is
    available. If not, use the power plug from the disconnected drive.
    2. After verifying that your connections are OK, insert the Ghost bootable
    floppy disk and boot. Make absolutely certain that as you go through the
    cloning process, you've correctly selected the source disk (the disk you're
    cloning FROM) and the destination disk (the disk you're cloning TO). I
    cannot stress this enough. More than one user (including myself!) has (to
    his or her dismay) mistakenly identified the source and destination disks
    with the usual miserable consequences.
    3. After the cloning process ends, disconnect the ribbon cable and power
    plug from the newly cloned drive and reconnect these to the drive from which
    it was previously removed. Disconnect the ribbon cable and power plug from
    your old drive and remove the drive. Then install the newly cloned one in
    its place. Make sure your jumper settings on the new drive are identical (in
    configuration) to the drive you're replacing. Connect the ribbon cable and
    power plug from the old drive to the new one.
    4. Boot the computer to verify that all is well. Assuming it is, close the
    computer case.


    --
    Tumppi
    Reply to group
    =================================================
    Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
    Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
    (translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
    =================================================


    "T. Jenkins" <TJenkins@discussions.microsoft.com> kirjoitti viestissä
    news:849B23FD-A65D-4717-AE64-51C831A66F6F@microsoft.com...
    > I have a Dell Dimension 8200 with a Pentium 4, 1.8 GHz. A while back, I
    > installed a new ~75GB hard drive as the secondary drive (slave is the
    term,
    > right?). Based on the fact that this is a newer drive, and on my own
    > experience using the computer, I'm pretty sure the new drive is a lot
    faster
    > than the original one.
    >
    > I'd like to make the best use of this additional speed, and was thinking
    > about moving Windows and most of my program files to it. The older, 40GB
    > drive could then be used for backup/archives.
    >
    > I've done some initial searches, both here and on MS's knowledge base, but
    > couldn't find instructions for doing what I want to do. Also review
    > www.michaelstevenstech.com, found the Move XP section, but still didn't
    seem
    > like an exact match.
    >
    > My preference is not to reinstall everything if I can, but I know it's not
    > just a simple matter of moving files. Can anyone point me to instructions
    > for doing what I want to do?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Todd
    >
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