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WIFI questions

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 4, 2005 8:04:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

HI all,

I'm quite new to this wireless revolution so sorry if I sound a bit
vague. I've just move into a flat which already has a wireless network
connected to the internet (is itscalled a wireless router?). I'm
planning to get a laptop which I'd like to connect to this wireless
network, and also to the wireless hotspots at my uni and at cafes,
airports etc. Should I get a 802.11a, 802.11b or 802.11g enabled card
(what exactly is the difference?). Are there any cards that have all
three protocols? Its important as I want to be able to connect wherever
I go. Any responses would be appreciated.

Regards

NN

More about : wifi questions

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 4, 2005 10:47:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Ok, I appreciate the replies. So if I get a card like this
(http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/tg/stores/detail/-/...)
, it should work fine wherever I go? I've also heard the builtin wifi
capabilities on the new laptops are very shoddy (lower sensitivity
etc.), is this true?

Thanks

NN
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 5, 2005 3:19:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

nasefk@gmail.com wrote:
>I've also heard the builtin wifi
>capabilities on the new laptops are very shoddy (lower sensitivity

Not at all. While it's certainly possible to build a laptop with
worse RF performance than an add-on card, you'd have to work at it
pretty hard. Maybe I'm spoiled, my Dell Latitude D600 has one of the
best builtin wireless setups available...
Related resources
September 5, 2005 4:09:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Sun, 04 Sep 2005 16:04:32 -0700, Freshwater Spaceman wrote:

> HI all,
>
> I'm quite new to this wireless revolution so sorry if I sound a bit
> vague. I've just move into a flat which already has a wireless network
> connected to the internet (is itscalled a wireless router?). I'm
> planning to get a laptop which I'd like to connect to this wireless
> network, and also to the wireless hotspots at my uni and at cafes,
> airports etc. Should I get a 802.11a, 802.11b or 802.11g enabled card
> (what exactly is the difference?). Are there any cards that have all
> three protocols? Its important as I want to be able to connect wherever
> I go. Any responses would be appreciated.
>
> Regards
>
> NN

There are a/b/g cards but the most common hotspots are b/g. 'a' operates
on a different frequency than b/g.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 5, 2005 5:03:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Freshwater Spaceman" <Interplanetary.Pirate@gmail.com> wrote in
news:1125875072.211249.282750@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

> HI all,
>
> I'm quite new to this wireless revolution so sorry if I sound a
> bit vague. I've just move into a flat which already has a
> wireless network connected to the internet (is itscalled a
> wireless router?). I'm planning to get a laptop which I'd like
> to connect to this wireless network, and also to the wireless
> hotspots at my uni and at cafes, airports etc. Should I get a
> 802.11a, 802.11b or 802.11g enabled card (what exactly is the
> difference?). Are there any cards that have all three protocols?
> Its important as I want to be able to connect wherever I go. Any
> responses would be appreciated.
>
> Regards
>
> NN
>

Get 11b/11g with WPA security. Most new laptops and adapters have
this.

If you need to buy a separate adapter (PC Card or USB) they cost
around £35 ($50).

11a is a technology dead-end. Ignore it.

11b supports 11Mbps and WEP security, which has significant
weaknesses.

11g devices support 54Mbps and WPA security, which is superior to
WEP.
11g devices also support 11b's capabilities.
September 7, 2005 2:37:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

William P. N. Smith wrote:
> nasefk@gmail.com wrote:
>
>>I've also heard the builtin wifi
>>capabilities on the new laptops are very shoddy (lower sensitivity
>
>
> Not at all. While it's certainly possible to build a laptop with
> worse RF performance than an add-on card, you'd have to work at it
> pretty hard. Maybe I'm spoiled, my Dell Latitude D600 has one of the
> best builtin wireless setups available...


I have an intel card built into my dell laptop that works great
(2200bg). Better than using a pcmcia card most times as I have one of
those too. For the little extra get the more expensive intel card if
offered by your laptop manufacturer (dell) it will pay off in the end
with the sensitivity of it. Also download the intel software for the
card and use that instead of Windows to configure your card when
associating with hotspots.
September 7, 2005 5:02:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On 9/7/2005 11:37 AM, DS wrote:
> William P. N. Smith wrote:
>
>> nasefk@gmail.com wrote:
>>
>>> I've also heard the builtin wifi
>>> capabilities on the new laptops are very shoddy (lower sensitivity
>>
>>
>>
>> Not at all. While it's certainly possible to build a laptop with
>> worse RF performance than an add-on card, you'd have to work at it
>> pretty hard. Maybe I'm spoiled, my Dell Latitude D600 has one of the
>> best builtin wireless setups available...
>
>
>
> I have an intel card built into my dell laptop that works great
> (2200bg). Better than using a pcmcia card most times as I have one of
> those too. For the little extra get the more expensive intel card if
> offered by your laptop manufacturer (dell) it will pay off in the end
> with the sensitivity of it. Also download the intel software for the
> card and use that instead of Windows to configure your card when
> associating with hotspots.

Don't most laptops run the antennae along the edge of the LCD screen? I
get much better signal with my corporate D600 with built-in Intel
Centrino than with my Inspiron 6150 with LinkSys pccard.
!