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Caller ID shows only "716"

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Anonymous
January 27, 2005 1:51:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

For the past couple of days I've been getting calls on my VX6000 that
show up as "716" and nothing else. They happen at seemingly random
intervals. I've picked up one of them and no one answered (it was
immediately disconnected), and nothing is ever left on my voice mail.

I searched the internet and found a post here:
http://tinyurl.com/45v7m but the poster was anonymous and there was
no reply.

Does anyone know what this is? It seems more like some kind of glitch
to me than someone harrassing me. In fact, there it goes again, as I
type this.

I called Verizon and they said they can't do anything without being
subpoenaed, which means calling my local law enforcement. I'd really
rather not do that, but I'm starting to think it's the only thing that
will stop this nonsense.

Any advice/help/info is appreciated. Thanks.

--Quadriflax
"To insanity and beyond..."

More about : caller shows 716

Anonymous
January 27, 2005 1:51:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quadriflax wrote:
> For the past couple of days I've been getting calls on my VX6000 that
> show up as "716" and nothing else. They happen at seemingly random
> intervals. I've picked up one of them and no one answered (it was
> immediately disconnected), and nothing is ever left on my voice mail.
>
> I searched the internet and found a post here:
> http://tinyurl.com/45v7m but the poster was anonymous and there was
> no reply.
>
> Does anyone know what this is? It seems more like some kind of glitch
> to me than someone harrassing me. In fact, there it goes again, as I
> type this.
>
> I called Verizon and they said they can't do anything without being
> subpoenaed, which means calling my local law enforcement. I'd really
> rather not do that, but I'm starting to think it's the only thing that
> will stop this nonsense.
>
> Any advice/help/info is appreciated. Thanks.
>
> --Quadriflax
> "To insanity and beyond..."

Sure.. You have a telemarketer dialing your phone (maybe/maybe not ac 716,
((don't know where you area, but 716 is the NW New York: Buffalo, Rochester
area code)) Or could just be list 716, or could just be the telemarketers
trick, to get by any no caller id block.)
At any rate, that's the new trick since there is at least some silly
caller-id that means nothing, you can't block calls with no caller id since
it has one.

Not much you can do about it, don't answer, welcome to the world of
annoyance and harrasing phone calls
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 1:51:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quadriflax wrote:
>
> For the past couple of days I've been getting calls on my VX6000 that
> show up as "716" and nothing else. They happen at seemingly random
> intervals. I've picked up one of them and no one answered (it was
> immediately disconnected), and nothing is ever left on my voice mail.
>
> <snip>

Her Majesty's Secret Service (Similar to "007")?

Notan
Related resources
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:19 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 15:59:23 -0800, "Peter Pan"
<Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

>Sure.. You have a telemarketer dialing your phone (maybe/maybe not ac 716,
>((don't know where you area, but 716 is the NW New York: Buffalo, Rochester
>area code)) Or could just be list 716, or could just be the telemarketers
>trick, to get by any no caller id block.)
>At any rate, that's the new trick since there is at least some silly
>caller-id that means nothing, you can't block calls with no caller id since
>it has one.
>
>Not much you can do about it, don't answer, welcome to the world of
>annoyance and harrasing phone calls
>

How do they trick the call ID to read just a three digit number? I've
never heard of anything like that before. I'm in Rochester, and 716
was my old area code from a couple of years ago until they switched to
585. But you wouldn't happen to have a link to some more information
on this, would you?

Because wouldn't the telemarketer's goal be to TALK to me to try and
sell me something? I'm not even getting any hang ups on my voice
mail, I don't hear even a click when I try to answer. It almost
sounds like some kind of technical glitch on Verizon's end, or with my
phone.

I guess I don't get how you can trick caller ID. Block it, yes, but
trick it?

I actually did talk with my local PD, and they said (of course) that
there's nothing they can do unless it's coming up as restricted, a
number, or is threatening in nature. They can't get involved unless
there's a crime. Which I figured, but how the hell can Verizon claim
they can't let me know who's calling MY phone? What the hell is that?

I'm going to wait and see what happens, but if it keeps it up I might
have to switch my number.

--Quadriflax
"To insanity and beyond..."
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quadriflax wrote:
>
> How do they trick the call ID to read just a three digit number? I've
> never heard of anything like that before. I'm in Rochester, and 716
> was my old area code from a couple of years ago until they switched to
> 585. But you wouldn't happen to have a link to some more information
> on this, would you?
>
> --Quadriflax
> "To insanity and beyond..."

You can forge a caller ID very simply, search on the internet for that, I
won't paste the results here since there are 10 of thousands of them, but
this site has some good info... http://www.verizonfears.com/

The other part of your question was link to a site that does it.. There are
quite a few, some just for a test to try it but they charge $5, however
there are dozens of commercial sites that sell Caller ID Spoofing services.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quadriflax wrote:
>
> On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 15:59:23 -0800, "Peter Pan"
> <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:
>
> >Sure.. You have a telemarketer dialing your phone (maybe/maybe not ac 716,
> >((don't know where you area, but 716 is the NW New York: Buffalo, Rochester
> >area code)) Or could just be list 716, or could just be the telemarketers
> >trick, to get by any no caller id block.)
> >At any rate, that's the new trick since there is at least some silly
> >caller-id that means nothing, you can't block calls with no caller id since
> >it has one.
> >
> >Not much you can do about it, don't answer, welcome to the world of
> >annoyance and harrasing phone calls
> >
>
> How do they trick the call ID to read just a three digit number? I've
> never heard of anything like that before. I'm in Rochester, and 716
> was my old area code from a couple of years ago until they switched to
> 585. But you wouldn't happen to have a link to some more information
> on this, would you?
>
> Because wouldn't the telemarketer's goal be to TALK to me to try and
> sell me something? I'm not even getting any hang ups on my voice
> mail, I don't hear even a click when I try to answer. It almost
> sounds like some kind of technical glitch on Verizon's end, or with my
> phone.
>
> I guess I don't get how you can trick caller ID. Block it, yes, but
> trick it?
>
> I actually did talk with my local PD, and they said (of course) that
> there's nothing they can do unless it's coming up as restricted, a
> number, or is threatening in nature. They can't get involved unless
> there's a crime. Which I figured, but how the hell can Verizon claim
> they can't let me know who's calling MY phone? What the hell is that?
>
> I'm going to wait and see what happens, but if it keeps it up I might
> have to switch my number.
>
> --Quadriflax
> "To insanity and beyond..."

Wonder if it is a robot dialer looking for fax machines or computers
that hangs up as soon as it recognuzes your phone is neither.

LB
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quadriflax wrote:


> How do they trick the call ID to read just a three digit number? I've
> never heard of anything like that before. I'm in Rochester, and 716
> was my old area code from a couple of years ago until they switched to
> 585. But you wouldn't happen to have a link to some more information
> on this, would you?

I don't, but it's easy - call 888-480-4638 and the call gets forwarded to my
Sprint PCS phone, and 888-480-4638 is sent to my phone as the caller ID instead
of the area code 734 number actually associated with the number (the forwarding
is done by a small phone company in that area code, just outside of Detroit).

In this particular case I happen to know it's done with a PC and software and
hardware readily available, and it can be done with almost any PBX system -
there's really no verification possible, not the way the phone system is set up.

> I guess I don't get how you can trick caller ID. Block it, yes, but
> trick it?

You can't with a regular phone line and a single phone. You can with a PBX and
certain types of phone service.

> I'm going to wait and see what happens, but if it keeps it up I might
> have to switch my number.

Or you could just ignore calls with bogus CID.

--
JustThe.net - Apple Valley, CA - http://JustThe.net/ - 888.480.4NET (4638)
Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / sjsobol@JustThe.net / PGP: 0xE3AE35ED

"In case anyone was wondering, that big glowing globe above the Victor
Valley is the sun." -Victorville _Daily Press_ on the unusually large
amount of rain the Southland has gotten this winter (January 12th, 2005)
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

When I call my cell phone from half my company PBX extentions, only the
3-digit extension number shows. For some reason that is all that is being
sent by the PBX. My wife called me from her new office phone and my Caller
ID read "297." I asked her if her new extension was 297 and she wondered
how I knew.

Bill Radio
Click for Western U.S. Wireless Reviews at:
http://www.mountainwireless.com



"Quadriflax" <quadriNOflax@yahooSPAM.com> wrote in message
news:2tcgv0daj7s661vrq4lho7ib5p8mr0boia@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 15:59:23 -0800, "Peter Pan"
>
> I'm going to wait and see what happens, but if it keeps it up I might
> have to switch my number.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

LB@notmine.com wrote:
>
> Wonder if it is a robot dialer looking for fax machines or computers
> that hangs up as soon as it recognuzes your phone is neither.
>
> LB

You may be missing the most obvious reason.. What if it is a robot dialer
looking for VALID phone numbers, and add em to a to call list if a live
person answers (no fax no voice mail etc) and hangs up when it gets a live
voice and adds it the the list?

Think about this, there are laws against spam, and one person was actually
prosecuted, but most people still get dozens a day.. What makes you think
telemarketer calls will stop just because a law against it was passed?
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Peter Pan wrote:
> LB@notmine.com wrote:
>>
>> Wonder if it is a robot dialer looking for fax machines
>> or computers that hangs up as soon as it recognuzes your
>> phone is neither.
>>
>> LB
>
> You may be missing the most obvious reason.. What if it
> is a robot dialer looking for VALID phone numbers, and
> add em to a to call list if a live person answers (no fax
> no voice mail etc) and hangs up when it gets a live voice
> and adds it the the list?
>
> Think about this, there are laws against spam, and one
> person was actually prosecuted, but most people still get
> dozens a day.. What makes you think telemarketer calls
> will stop just because a law against it was passed?

Oh, I don't know. Cause maybe calls are a bit more easily
traced to origin? What's the potential penalty?

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
> Peter Pan wrote:
>> LB@notmine.com wrote:
>>>
>>> Wonder if it is a robot dialer looking for fax machines
>>> or computers that hangs up as soon as it recognuzes your
>>> phone is neither.
>>>
>>> LB
>>
>> You may be missing the most obvious reason.. What if it
>> is a robot dialer looking for VALID phone numbers, and
>> add em to a to call list if a live person answers (no fax
>> no voice mail etc) and hangs up when it gets a live voice
>> and adds it the the list?
>>
>> Think about this, there are laws against spam, and one
>> person was actually prosecuted, but most people still get
>> dozens a day.. What makes you think telemarketer calls
>> will stop just because a law against it was passed?
>
> Oh, I don't know. Cause maybe calls are a bit more easily
> traced to origin? What's the potential penalty?
>
> -Quick

If the caller is from outside the US (and yes, you can get tie lines, ie no
tolls), there isn't a dang thing that can be done legally. You can get
millions of email addresses on cd for spam, guess what, you can ALSO get cd
lists of valid phone numbers!

Think worldwide, rather than think that the whole world is just like the
US....

Think it's too expensive to call to from other countries? Why are call
centers for some of the big tech companies being located in say India.. If
it was that expensive, they wouldn't have em there, the phone charges would
be way too high!

Use your favorite search engine for "valid phone numbers on cd"... I did,
and won't even bother with the pages and pages and pages etc of results.....
Metasearch results 1 - 10 of about 152,020 for valid phone numbers on cd

How about searching for "toll free calling from other countries"
Wow... incredible.... Metasearch results 1 - 10 of about 273,020 for toll
free calling from other countries

to reask your question, "What's the potential penalty?"... ZERO ZIP NADA
ZILCH NOTHING <--- there's 81 synonyms for none, shall I keep typing or
wanna look in a thesaurus? (although some are a bit wierd... no big
enchilada !?!?!?)
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Peter Pan wrote:
> Quick wrote:
>> Peter Pan wrote:
>>> LB@notmine.com wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Wonder if it is a robot dialer looking for fax machines
>>>> or computers that hangs up as soon as it recognuzes
>>>> your phone is neither.
>>>>
>>>> LB
>>>
>>> You may be missing the most obvious reason.. What if it
>>> is a robot dialer looking for VALID phone numbers, and
>>> add em to a to call list if a live person answers (no
>>> fax no voice mail etc) and hangs up when it gets a live
>>> voice and adds it the the list?
>>>
>>> Think about this, there are laws against spam, and one
>>> person was actually prosecuted, but most people still
>>> get dozens a day.. What makes you think telemarketer
>>> calls will stop just because a law against it was
>>> passed?
>>
>> Oh, I don't know. Cause maybe calls are a bit more easily
>> traced to origin? What's the potential penalty?
>>
>> -Quick
>
> If the caller is from outside the US (and yes, you can
> get tie lines, ie no tolls), there isn't a dang thing
> that can be done legally. You can get millions of email
> addresses on cd for spam, guess what, you can ALSO get cd
> lists of valid phone numbers!

Having the phone numbers has nothing to do with anything.
..121 numbers are well defined. A computer can run through
them easily, classify and file them. That's not the issue.

>
> Think worldwide, rather than think that the whole world
> is just like the US....
>
> Think it's too expensive to call to from other countries?
> Why are call centers for some of the big tech companies
> being located in say India.. If it was that expensive,
> they wouldn't have em there, the phone charges would be
> way too high!

Sorry. It's the person sitting on the end of the phone that
is the overriding expense.

> Use your favorite search engine for "valid phone numbers
> on cd"... I did, and won't even bother with the pages and
> pages and pages etc of results..... Metasearch results 1
> - 10 of about 152,020 for valid phone numbers on cd

See above (again).

> How about searching for "toll free calling from other
> countries"
> Wow... incredible.... Metasearch results 1 - 10 of about
> 273,020 for toll free calling from other countries

See above (again).

> to reask your question, "What's the potential
> penalty?"... ZERO ZIP NADA ZILCH NOTHING <--- there's 81
> synonyms for none, shall I keep typing or wanna look in a
> thesaurus? (although some are a bit wierd... no big
> enchilada !?!?!?)

Let me ask the question again... What is the penalty?
Or did they pass a law with no penalty.

We can discuss enforceability in the next chapter.

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:26:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
> Let me ask the question again... What is the penalty?
> Or did they pass a law with no penalty.
>
> We can discuss enforceability in the next chapter.
>
> -Quick

Apparntly I wasn't clear enough.. For a caller outside the US, calling a
number inside the US... ABSOLUTELY NO PENALTY from US laws.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 12:11:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Peter Pan wrote:
> Quick wrote:
>> Let me ask the question again... What is the penalty?
>> Or did they pass a law with no penalty.
>>
>> We can discuss enforceability in the next chapter.
>>
>> -Quick
>
> Apparntly I wasn't clear enough.. For a caller outside
> the US, calling a number inside the US... ABSOLUTELY NO
> PENALTY from US laws.

It is a simple question.
What is the penalty as the law is written?

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 12:15:09 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Peter Pan wrote:
> Quick wrote:
>> Let me ask the question again... What is the penalty?
>> Or did they pass a law with no penalty.
>>
>> We can discuss enforceability in the next chapter.
>>
>> -Quick
>
> Apparntly I wasn't clear enough.. For a caller outside
> the US, calling a number inside the US... ABSOLUTELY NO
> PENALTY from US laws.

Oh... sorry, maybe I misunderstood.

Are you saying that the law/regulation as written specifically
states "there is no penalty for calls made from outside the US"?

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:18:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 00:26:19 GMT, Quadriflax
<quadriNOflax@yahooSPAM.com> wrote:

>How do they trick the call ID to read just a three digit number? I've
>never heard of anything like that before.

With a PRI and the right software, you can put in whatever caller ID
you want. When I administered the phone system at a company I worked
at, it was a field in the software. I could have put 111-111-1111 if I
wanted. I never tried a 3 digit number.

>I'm in Rochester, and 716 was my old area code from a couple of years ago until they switched to
>585. But you wouldn't happen to have a link to some more information
>on this, would you?

Information on what?

>Because wouldn't the telemarketer's goal be to TALK to me to try and
>sell me something?

Yes, but not to give you a valid telephone number.

>I guess I don't get how you can trick caller ID. Block it, yes, but
>trick it?

Yes, you can.

>but how the hell can Verizon claim they can't let me know who's calling MY phone? What the hell is that?

Privacy. Unless it's harassment. They do have a code you can use,
*<something> and with a police or court order, they will reveal the
number to the police, but again, it would have to be a harassment
issue or other police issue.

>I'm going to wait and see what happens, but if it keeps it up I might
>have to switch my number.

Have you tried to *69 them?
--
To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:22:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 20:37:17 -0800, "Peter Pan"
<Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

>Think it's too expensive to call to from other countries? Why are call
>centers for some of the big tech companies being located in say India..

Most of them I believe use IP phones. No toll charges there. :) 
--
To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:36:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
> Peter Pan wrote:
>> Quick wrote:
>>> Let me ask the question again... What is the penalty?
>>> Or did they pass a law with no penalty.
>>>
>>> We can discuss enforceability in the next chapter.
>>>
>>> -Quick
>>
>> Apparntly I wasn't clear enough.. For a caller outside
>> the US, calling a number inside the US... ABSOLUTELY NO
>> PENALTY from US laws.
>
> Oh... sorry, maybe I misunderstood.
>
> Are you saying that the law/regulation as written specifically
> states "there is no penalty for calls made from outside the US"?
>
> -Quick

It doesn't HAVE to be written that way.. US law doesn't matter/apply outside
of the US!
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 3:57:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Evan Platt wrote:
> On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 20:37:17 -0800, "Peter Pan"
> <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:
>
>> Think it's too expensive to call to from other
>> countries? Why are call centers for some of the big tech
>> companies being located in say India..
>
> Most of them I believe use IP phones. No toll charges
> there. :) 

Yes, there is a charge for the service by the service provider
unless you're calling IP phone to IP phone and then you
still have to pay your ISP.

But that's insignificant to the cost of the person making the
call. Automated voice recordings (pre-emptive Peter Pan
response reply) don't work. Not effective. You can't make the
analogy to (email) spam. For spam to be effective you only
need a single "hit" in 10s of thousands all of which can be
generated in minutes or seconds. A voice recording/
telemarketer call is in real time. It doesn't scale.

All the above is *beside* the point. Cost is completely
tangential to the issue.
1) telemarketing is for domestic products.
2) even if the call is originated from overseas it can
easily be tied to the domestic product/firm.

Please focus (very narrowly PeterPan) on the above
2 points and show me where I'm wrong.

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 5:33:56 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
>
> But that's insignificant to the cost of the person making the
> call. Automated voice recordings (pre-emptive Peter Pan
> response reply) don't work. Not effective. You can't make the
> analogy to (email) spam. For spam to be effective you only
> need a single "hit" in 10s of thousands all of which can be
> generated in minutes or seconds. A voice recording/
> telemarketer call is in real time. It doesn't scale.
>
> All the above is *beside* the point. Cost is completely
> tangential to the issue.
> 1) telemarketing is for domestic products.
> 2) even if the call is originated from overseas it can
> easily be tied to the domestic product/firm.
>
> Please focus (very narrowly PeterPan) on the above
> 2 points and show me where I'm wrong.
>
> -Quick

You missed the point that there are over 41,000 hits on searching for US
firms that sell validated email and phone numbers on CD to the
telemarketers. (search criteria: verified phone numbers on CD)

If I was an overseas telemarketer, would I want to make thousands of calls
to people in the US to get a valid number, or pay a few hundred bucks for a
list of numbers/emails that have been verified and are usually answered by a
live person?

You have made one MAJOR error in your suppositions... Telemarketing is *NOT*
for domestic products only.. Got a walmart near you? How much of the stuff
they sell is made domestically?
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 6:05:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Peter Pan wrote:
> Quick wrote:
>>
>> But that's insignificant to the cost of the person
>> making the call. Automated voice recordings (pre-emptive
>> Peter Pan response reply) don't work. Not effective. You
>> can't make the analogy to (email) spam. For spam to be
>> effective you only need a single "hit" in 10s of
>> thousands all of which can be generated in minutes or
>> seconds. A voice recording/ telemarketer call is in real
>> time. It doesn't scale.
>>
>> All the above is *beside* the point. Cost is completely
>> tangential to the issue.
>> 1) telemarketing is for domestic products.
>> 2) even if the call is originated from overseas it can
>> easily be tied to the domestic product/firm.
>>
>> Please focus (very narrowly PeterPan) on the above
>> 2 points and show me where I'm wrong.
>>
>> -Quick
>
> You missed the point that there are over 41,000 hits on
> searching for US firms that sell validated email and
> phone numbers on CD to the telemarketers. (search
> criteria: verified phone numbers on CD)

No I didn't miss it.
First of all drop the email part. Forget about spam.
It's not the same. We are (well at least I'm trying to)
talking about telemarketing here.

The availability of validated and classified phone numbers
is not in question, not the issue, and not relavent. Please
let it go and try to move on.

> If I was an overseas telemarketer, would I want to make
> thousands of calls to people in the US to get a valid
> number, or pay a few hundred bucks for a list of
> numbers/emails that have been verified and are usually
> answered by a live person?

Gees, get past it. Lets assume that EVERYBODY already has
EVERYBODY's phone number and all their personal information
and buying habits, etc. Let's start there.


> You have made one MAJOR error in your suppositions...
> Telemarketing is *NOT* for domestic products only.. Got a
> walmart near you? How much of the stuff they sell is made
> domestically?

It's hopeless isn't it?
Let's try a SIMPLE analogy...
Let's assume that Walmart was to employ illegal immigrants
as stock persons at the Walmart down the street from me.
Let's assume that the INS became aware of this violation of
law.

Are you saying that Walmart would be exempt from penalty
because the stuff they sell is made overseas?

Focus Peter Pan, try to focus...
-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 7:28:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:

>
> Focus Peter Pan, try to focus...
> -Quick

Okay, i'll focus and just say what an idiot I think you are, and how you are
intentionally posting FALSE information.
You are really friggen stupid, intentionally trying to pass false
information, or just a plain old idiot trying to pass along FALSE
INFORMATION!
Hint... IT'S a *REALITY* that people get calls on their phones/cellphones
from offshore marketers!
There is not a friggen thing the US laws/courts can do to stop it!
Your insistence that they are laws against it so it can never happen is just
plain wrong and stupid!
Sounds like you are one of those idiots that think the whole world revolves
around teh US... hey guess what.... It doesn't!
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 7:33:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Peter Pan wrote:
> Quick wrote:
>
>>
>> Focus Peter Pan, try to focus...
>> -Quick
>
> Okay, i'll focus and just say what an idiot I think you
> are, and how you are intentionally posting FALSE
> information.
> You are really friggen stupid, intentionally trying to
> pass false information, or just a plain old idiot trying
> to pass along FALSE INFORMATION!
> Hint... IT'S a *REALITY* that people get calls on their
> phones/cellphones from offshore marketers!
> There is not a friggen thing the US laws/courts can do to
> stop it!
> Your insistence that they are laws against it so it can
> never happen is just plain wrong and stupid!
> Sounds like you are one of those idiots that think the
> whole world revolves around teh US... hey guess what....
> It doesn't!

sigh... i actually thought you were going to engage in an
intelligent conversation this time and not revert to your
standard response of labeling everyone as "intentionally
spreading LIES"... o, well.

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 8:32:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

> Are you saying that the law/regulation as written specifically
> states "there is no penalty for calls made from outside the US"?

No, not to my knowledge, it's not specifically written to say that... but
it's impossible to enforce it since it's out of the US jurisdiction without
assistance from local authorities and unless it was a major scam, the locals
won't do anything. (This is also a problem with the anti-spam laws.)
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 8:32:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

cricket wrote:
>> Are you saying that the law/regulation as written
>> specifically states "there is no penalty for calls made
>> from outside the US"?
>
> No, not to my knowledge, it's not specifically written to
> say that...

Thanks, I know that. It was a rehtorical question for
PeterPan with absolutely no hope or expectation of
a coherent reply.

It is relevant though. Certainly a very direct and probably
effective deterrent to local infractions. Easily enforceable.

> but it's impossible to enforce it since it's
> out of the US jurisdiction without assistance from local
> authorities and unless it was a major scam, the locals
> won't do anything. (This is also a problem with the
> anti-spam laws.)

I don't agree. Spam is different as the product usually
does not have any geographical dependencies.

Think about what telemarketers sell. I cannot recall ever
have been cold called for an international product.
If we can agree on that then there may be some
valid discussion on the concept of overseas call centers.

Are they even viable in the context of telemarketing?
If we agree that the product is domestic wouldn't it be
a simple matter to tie an overseas call center with the
domestic business contracting it? It's kind of important
for them to tell you what to buy and how to buy it, right?

-Quick
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 8:42:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
> Peter Pan wrote:
>> Quick wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> Focus Peter Pan, try to focus...
>>> -Quick
>>
>> Okay, i'll focus and just say what an idiot I think you
>> are, and how you are intentionally posting FALSE
>> information.
>> You are really friggen stupid, intentionally trying to
>> pass false information, or just a plain old idiot trying
>> to pass along FALSE INFORMATION!
>> Hint... IT'S a *REALITY* that people get calls on their
>> phones/cellphones from offshore marketers!
>> There is not a friggen thing the US laws/courts can do to
>> stop it!
>> Your insistence that they are laws against it so it can
>> never happen is just plain wrong and stupid!
>> Sounds like you are one of those idiots that think the
>> whole world revolves around teh US... hey guess what....
>> It doesn't!
>
> sigh... i actually thought you were going to engage in an
> intelligent conversation this time and not revert to your
> standard response of labeling everyone as "intentionally
> spreading LIES"... o, well.
>
> -Quick

Okay, you've proved which you are.. If not intentionally lying, then you are
just plain STUPID
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 9:26:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 12:57:20 -0800, "Quick"
<quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote:

>Yes, there is a charge for the service by the service provider
>unless you're calling IP phone to IP phone and then you
>still have to pay your ISP.

I realize that, however if a call is transferred from say someone
calling ABC Corp in the USA, and the call is transferred to tech
support in India using a IP phone, there is no international call
charge incurred.
--
To reply, remove TheObvious from my e-mail address.
Anonymous
January 27, 2005 9:46:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Evan Platt wrote:
> On Thu, 27 Jan 2005 12:57:20 -0800, "Quick"
> <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Yes, there is a charge for the service by the service
>> provider unless you're calling IP phone to IP phone and
>> then you
>> still have to pay your ISP.
>
> I realize that, however if a call is transferred from say
> someone calling ABC Corp in the USA, and the call is
> transferred to tech support in India using a IP phone,
> there is no international call charge incurred.

Sure. Nifty application. I was involved with a start-up
where we made a LAN based, extensible, PBX. Each
unit had some number of analog trunks, a greater
number of analog extensions, and then voice and control
over IP. You could have IP phones as extensions or
VoIP and control to other units giving you a distributed
PBX. ...part of your distributed PBX could be here and
part anywhere else. Using the PSTN you could dial a
local number to get a local dial tone at the location of
your overseas office. neat.

I agree that international calling can be inexpensive.

The question is:
*In the context of telemarketing*, is the "do not call" law
enforceable?

I say yes because telemarketing calls will be able to be
effectively linked to firms with a domestic presence.

-Quick

Side note for the twit: This is a very different question
than "can I call you from overseas whether you like it
or not".
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 1:12:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

they really sell stuff? <g> I'm thinking more along the telemarketer scams -
legit (but annoying) telemarketers will follow the laws and not irritate
their potential customers. The scammers will do what they can to avoid the
laws - and that means operating outside the country.


------------------
> Think about what telemarketers sell. I cannot recall ever
> have been cold called for an international product.
> If we can agree on that then there may be some
> valid discussion on the concept of overseas call centers.
>
> Are they even viable in the context of telemarketing?
> If we agree that the product is domestic wouldn't it be
> a simple matter to tie an overseas call center with the
> domestic business contracting it? It's kind of important
> for them to tell you what to buy and how to buy it, right?
>
> -Quick
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 1:12:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

cricket wrote:
> they really sell stuff? <g> I'm thinking more along the
> telemarketer scams - legit (but annoying) telemarketers
> will follow the laws and not irritate their potential
> customers. The scammers will do what they can to avoid
> the laws - and that means operating outside the country.

To what end?
To sell you something? That's my guess.
What do you think that something might be?
My guess is some domestic product.

Can we agree on that? Or are you permanently sidetracked
with PeterPan?

(i think i may have slipped into some parallel universe)
-Quick
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 1:12:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Quick wrote:
> cricket wrote:
>> they really sell stuff? <g> I'm thinking more along the
>> telemarketer scams - legit (but annoying) telemarketers
>> will follow the laws and not irritate their potential
>> customers. The scammers will do what they can to avoid
>> the laws - and that means operating outside the country.
>
> To what end?
> To sell you something? That's my guess.
> What do you think that something might be?
> My guess is some domestic product.
>
> Can we agree on that? Or are you permanently sidetracked
> with PeterPan?
>
> (i think i may have slipped into some parallel universe)
> -Quick

Heh! Peter Pan made a good point. I should have worded the
above differently.

Change "My guess is some domestic product",
To "My guess is some product sold by a firm with a domestic presence".

I now see where I may have befuddled someone...
-Quick
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 1:36:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Wed, 26 Jan 2005 17:56:43 -0800, "Peter Pan"
<Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

>You can forge a caller ID very simply, search on the internet for that, I
>won't paste the results here since there are 10 of thousands of them, but
>this site has some good info... http://www.verizonfears.com/
>
>The other part of your question was link to a site that does it.. There are
>quite a few, some just for a test to try it but they charge $5, however
>there are dozens of commercial sites that sell Caller ID Spoofing services.
>

Ugh. Thanks for the link.. I think. One more thing to look forward
to in the coming years. Hopefully someone at the different phone
companies will think of something to combat this.

I did talk with Verizon again and the tech guy on the other side
confirmed that it was also showing up as "716" in their database. As
far as I can tell there's zero traceability for something like this.
Granted I didn't fully understand all the technical jargon I read from
your link, but it looks painfully easy and cheap to set something like
this up.

The good news is I just put the 716 number in my phone, uploaded a
dead ringer, and set 716 to that. So now when it calls I don't even
get a ring. I guess that's the best I can do until they start again
with another number.

--Quadriflax
"To insanity and beyond..."
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 3:39:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

> To what end?
> To sell you something? That's my guess.

Some are just looking for ways to get you to part with your money... and
don't have a legit product to sell you.
Anonymous
February 16, 2005 4:46:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

www.verizonfears.com
www.covertcall.com


Notan wrote:
> Quadriflax wrote:
> >
> > For the past couple of days I've been getting calls on my VX6000
that
> > show up as "716" and nothing else. They happen at seemingly random
> > intervals. I've picked up one of them and no one answered (it was
> > immediately disconnected), and nothing is ever left on my voice
mail.
> >
> > <snip>
>
> Her Majesty's Secret Service (Similar to "007")?
>
> Notan
December 18, 2008 2:00:41 PM

716 calls from NOWHERE!
Starting a couple months I started receiving daily calls with 716 on the caller ID. When I answer nobody is there. The calls come in Monday thru Friday almost the same time everyday. I have service with Verizon and they are really helpless and incapable of troubleshooting the problem. Support is giving me poor excuses and they rushing to hang up.
I searched the internet and to my surprise there are a few other people posting the same problem. Has anyone gotten anywhere with this problem? Do you have any idea how to stop it?
Please help us this has become such a nuisance!
Thanks
Peter
email: peterpappas@hotmail.com

Quote:
Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

For the past couple of days I've been getting calls on my VX6000 that
show up as "716" and nothing else. They happen at seemingly random
intervals. I've picked up one of them and no one answered (it was
immediately disconnected), and nothing is ever left on my voice mail.

I searched the internet and found a post here:
http://tinyurl.com/45v7m but the poster was anonymous and there was
no reply.

Does anyone know what this is? It seems more like some kind of glitch
to me than someone harrassing me. In fact, there it goes again, as I
type this.

I called Verizon and they said they can't do anything without being
subpoenaed, which means calling my local law enforcement. I'd really
rather not do that, but I'm starting to think it's the only thing that
will stop this nonsense.

Any advice/help/info is appreciated. Thanks.

--Quadriflax
"To insanity and beyond..."

Anonymous
January 8, 2009 2:16:11 AM

I have a service with At&t and have the same situation. All At&t told me was to enroll my number with donotcall.gov that they provide their services to mobile numbers now,... but that it would take up to 6 weeks I hope it works.

for now it's very annoying! I wish it would sop I get 6 miss calls from '716' every morning to midafternoon,..

S
June 4, 2009 5:57:36 PM

Quote:
I have a service with At&t and have the same situation. All At&t told me was to enroll my number with donotcall.gov that they provide their services to mobile numbers now,... but that it would take up to 6 weeks I hope it works.

for now it's very annoying! I wish it would sop I get 6 miss calls from '716' every morning to midafternoon,..

S


I hope that works for you, but it hasn't for us. We have two AT&T cell phones and they have both been registered with the Do Not Call Registry for over two years. My husband is a critical care nurse and works 7pm to 7am. He gets woken up several times a week by his phone ringing and it's a telemarketer calling from some fraudulent credit card company. The numbers listed in the caller ID are too many for a legitimate phone number and AT&T also tells us there is nothing they can do. He hates to turn the phone off while he's sleeping in case I had an emergency and needed to reach him or in case the hospital calls with an emergency and needs him to come in. When the recording connects him to a person, they tell him they are calling from his credit card company to offer him a lower rate. When he tells them he doesn't have a credit card, they hang up. If he tells them they are calling his cell phone and waking him up and to put him on their do not call list, they hang up. If he asks for the company name, they hang up.

According to the FTC website, no company contacting anyone in the US is allowed to use an automated dialer to call a cell phone. There is an area to file a complaint, but if you can't get a legitimate number and they won't give you their company name, there isn't much you can do except suffer through it. I can understand just not answering the phone, but a ringing phone during the middle of the day when you've just worked 6 back to back 12 hours night shifts in critical care is beyond upsetting. I think the people that do this are scum....especially when they've already seen that you're not some idiot that's going to fall for their scam.

I don't understand why AT&T can't allow you a block feature to block any calls not coming from legitimate numbers at least.
October 18, 2011 8:53:25 PM

atomicleda said:
I hope that works for you, but it hasn't for us. We have two AT&T cell phones and they have both been registered with the Do Not Call Registry for over two years. My husband is a critical care nurse and works 7pm to 7am. He gets woken up several times a week by his phone ringing and it's a telemarketer calling from some fraudulent credit card company. The numbers listed in the caller ID are too many for a legitimate phone number and AT&T also tells us there is nothing they can do. He hates to turn the phone off while he's sleeping in case I had an emergency and needed to reach him or in case the hospital calls with an emergency and needs him to come in. When the recording connects him to a person, they tell him they are calling from his credit card company to offer him a lower rate. When he tells them he doesn't have a credit card, they hang up. If he tells them they are calling his cell phone and waking him up and to put him on their do not call list, they hang up. If he asks for the company name, they hang up.

According to the FTC website, no company contacting anyone in the US is allowed to use an automated dialer to call a cell phone. There is an area to file a complaint, but if you can't get a legitimate number and they won't give you their company name, there isn't much you can do except suffer through it. I can understand just not answering the phone, but a ringing phone during the middle of the day when you've just worked 6 back to back 12 hours night shifts in critical care is beyond upsetting. I think the people that do this are scum....especially when they've already seen that you're not some idiot that's going to fall for their scam.

I don't understand why AT&T can't allow you a block feature to block any calls not coming from legitimate numbers at least.


I know the thread is old but I found it as I am having the same issue but for those of you will find this in the future times ahead my phone has the android os and with that the option to save numbers to my contact list and when that number calls again it shunts them/it straight to voice mail as is with bill collectors and others of that sort.

I hope this helps
!