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Intro to fitness

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April 4, 2011 6:02:21 PM

Hello,

I cant help but notice after I got my nice desk job ive gotten about 20lbs heavier than where i would like to be. I was wondering if anyone could either give some hints or links to sites with a beginners approach to staying fit. I eat very healthy but am not too sure where to start when it comes to working out.

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April 4, 2011 6:39:18 PM

Quote:
I eat very healthy


If you've gained weight by sitting around you obviously don't. :) 

Easiest method to eat healthier is to stop drinking sodas, cakes, muffins and chocolates. Replace them with water, fruits and nuts. This is the single most important step, removing refined sugars is critical to a healthy life.

If you wish to lose weight, especially bodyfat, lowering your carbohydrate intake by replacing it with animal fats is the method to do so. Carbohydrates such as white breads, pastas, starches like potatoes; crisps chips etc should be lowered. Instead eat meals that are based on non-lean meats.

In the end though, you must find a diet that you can eat everyday, starving yourself or restricting yourself to certain foods is unsustainable and will result you revert to your old ways. If you make a change you must be able to make it permanently.
April 4, 2011 6:54:49 PM

Um im kind of offended.

I dont drink soda, havent had high fructose corn syrup for quite some time (~3 years), I have an almost completely organic diet, I dont eat sweets too often (Once a week). I have red Meat maybe 2-3 times a month (GF is a vegetarian, so this helps). I do booze more often then i should, My carb intake is a bit high (But im working on it).

Im an assistant network admin and I went from being very physically active at my old job to literally sitting for 8 hours a day. What I wanted was some info on how I could ease my way into exercising.

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April 4, 2011 7:00:06 PM

Weight is mostly determined by diet. Also making changes to your diet is much easier than trying to get to the gym every other day.

Foods like bread, pasta and potatoes (basically starches and sugars) are the main reason why you gain weight, especially if your lifestyle is sedentary or only mildly active.

Seeing that your diet is mainly carbohydrates, this explains why.
April 29, 2011 2:31:50 AM

evilgenius134 said:
Weight is mostly determined by diet


Actually weight is mostly determined by mass and gravitational constants. ;) 

As everyone gets older wanamingo their metabolic rate slows which means there is a greater tendency for the body to keep more fat reserves.

My advice to you would be try and walk around as much as possible. If you can walk to work then that's perfect. If you drive try parking somewhere slightly further away. During your lunch break just walk somewhere outside at whatever pace you feel like. If you don't know the area particularly well then go exploring. You'll be getting some fresh air, sun exposure and gentle exercise.
April 29, 2011 5:35:46 PM

Meh Ive just starting doing lots of coke and eating only a can of tuna and an apple a day.

May 7, 2011 7:48:42 AM

I feel your pain, I also have a desk job and probably spend about 12 hours at my desk every day working. I'm not saying there is a direct correlation between sitting all day and gaining weight, but if I'm not careful I can easily find myself gaining 10 lbs in a few months. This usually only happens during a big project where I am working lots of OT and have no time to exercise.

If your just looking to lose some weight (I trust you when you say you are eating healthy) I would suggest trying to do 30 minutes of cardio at least 3 times a week. This is a pretty low minimum and shouldn't be hard to do at all. You can also try and walk more during the day, but I have never found walking to be a great form of exercise (I'm sure a lot of people would disagree).
May 7, 2011 2:09:29 PM

Any sort of activity is better than none, at least in my opinion. If walking is all you have time for, it'll do. And yes, diet is key. Taking in less calories and being more active is the key to losing weight, plain and simple. Those calories you take in though should be good ones, i.e. less fat and carbs and more protein. Getting plenty of rest is key as well, especially if you really get a rigorous exercise regime going.
May 19, 2011 1:00:22 PM

anderson9731 said:
Massage has been used for many years as a healing therapy and benefits the body as a whole in a number of ways. Sports massage works predominantly to alleviate the buildup of stress and tension which occurs in the soft tissues of the body during physical activity.


Err ok but it doesn't really stop anyone from being a fat waster though!
May 21, 2011 8:51:06 PM

No doubt massage helps after physical activity, but for those not doing anything, it's just a luxury.
May 21, 2011 11:36:01 PM

I'm a runner; I can tell you about that if you want. It may suck at first, but once you get in moderate shape you'll be good. What did you do back when you were active?
May 24, 2011 3:15:57 PM

What I can also suggest as a beginners approach to starting a fitness program, is to establish and set some goals to work towards. They can be as simple as increasing your run distance by a certain amount (5 mins, 5%, 1 mile etc.) or lowering your heart rate during your normal exercises.

By setting realistic goals and being able to achieve them, you get a sense of accomplishment out of it, and it makes it worthwhile. Personally I have been able to reduce my heartrate during my normal run from 180 BPM down to 135 BPM, as well as increase my distances significantly. This makes it worthwhile going to the gym for me, and more direction because you are actually working towards something.

But when you get right down to it, going out and doing ANYTHING will help. As mentioned, even if you only have time for a walk get out and do it. Any physical activity will not be a bad thing and once you start getting in a routine it will come easier.
May 24, 2011 10:36:02 PM

kajabla said:
I'm a runner; I can tell you about that if you want. It may suck at first, but once you get in moderate shape you'll be good. What did you do back when you were active?


Agreed. Running does suck at first when you're out of shape, but once you get going you'll be in business. It almost becomes addicting after awhile.
May 25, 2011 6:04:59 AM

Excercise: Find something you like to do like a sport, running, biking, hiking, jazzercise or whatever and do it. It helps if you join a club, team, or class. But if you don't want that commitment, find some group that does pickup soccer or something like that. You'll have to ask around in your local area.

Maybe you could get a dog and walk it daily for a while or take it running at the beach on weekends? That only works if you like dogs.

Run to your car every day when you're done with work. Every little extra thing can burn 5 calories. Do it 5 times a day and you'll save 2.5lbs a year.


Calories: You eat "healthy". Sure, your arteries are in good shape. But that doesn't necessarily mean you're the weight you want to be. So count calories and figure out something you can change or replace for 50 calories a day. You can stop counting your calories in a month or so after you figure out what the general caloric values of foods are and figure out low calorie habits. You'd be surprised how many foods have low calorie alternatives.

Don't cook with olive oil because it's a "healthy" oil. Soften stuff up with water and half the olive oil. Don't eat a bunch of nuts because they're high calorie. Eat a handful of carrot sticks instead. Almonds aren't too bad though.

50 calories a day is 1500 a month and 5lbs a year. It'll maintain weight. If you want to lose weight, you'll need to cut out more calories or workout that extra 50.

Drinking a full glass of water before every meal can reduce your food intake dramatically.

Personally, I'd just cut my calories to 1200 a day and run a lot (3 miles, 4 times a week at least) for two months to lose 20 lbs.
May 27, 2011 1:24:45 AM

Agreed. If you want to lose weight, the simplest things to do are to cut calories (junk calories) and exercise more often. However, if you want to build muscle, after awhile you'll have to start taking in more calories.
May 27, 2011 3:27:33 AM

Well...protein more than calories, but yes. I was assuming the OP just wanted to get thin. That's more my issue than muscle anyways.
May 27, 2011 5:41:56 AM

Well, if you look at a top notch athlete like Michael Phelps, while when training for the Olympics was taking in 12,000 calories per day. 12,000.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,403803,00.html

If I did that now with my current activity level I'd be morbidly obese in months!
May 27, 2011 6:14:56 AM

Oh yeah, that's totally true for that sort of thing. I mostly was getting at the fact that VERY few Americans actually have a shortage of calories to the point where it prevents muscle growth. Plenty of people don't take in enough protein for muscles bulk though.

My initial point was minimal calories and long distance to destroy muscle and fat alike--that's the beauty of distance running if your goal is to just trim up--not that I do it.
May 27, 2011 4:21:36 PM

I've been in the IT field for years, which means once I got out of the "guy running around with a screwdriver" stage, it became pretty sedentary. Fortunately I have little difficulty maintaining my weight, which I attribute to diet; not just what I eat, but how much, and my whole approach to eating. Portion control is extremely important. I get picked on over it by friends, but I maintain an awareness of what I eat; in a day, week, or month. For example, my lunches on weekends are almost always peanut butter (natural, of course!) and crackers. If they're "Ritz" style, I'll eat 12-14, but if they're the larger saltines, probably 9-11. Sounds OCD I'm sure, but little stuff adds up. Sometimes I'll have a snack, and will adjust how much I eat at other meals that day if the snack was large (e.g. 6-7 pretzel rods) vs. small (e.g. a handful of nuts).
Also, I eat VERY slowly. That wasn't exactly by choice (I have some cranial nerve damage), but it means in the 20-30 minutes it takes the brain to realize the stomach is full, I haven't stuffed myself. My wife and I use much smaller plates than the massive platters that have become too common in American homes, so they look full with a lot less food on them. We don't eat until we're stuffed; we put what we'd like on our plates, eat it, then we're done.
Partially hydrogenated vegetable oil (also called trans fat) is industrial waste, not food, and will screw up your cholesterol balance. Avoid it, which means reading ingredient labels.
I want to exercise more too, and do have some ideas on it. Is bicycling to work an option for you? Instead of an expensive gym membership, on the weekends you don't do your own, spend an extra $5 on gas for the mower and cut a neighbor's lawn.
Anyway, good luck with your plan.
May 27, 2011 9:46:14 PM

During my last two years of undergrad I was putting it on thanks to a lack of activity and too much drinking. I weighed something like 170-175, which for someone who is 5'6" is a bit much. But once I started grad school and laid off the drinking, I've been at 150'ish for the past 4 years. Heck, I haven't had to change pant size since high school, even with the gain. I should probably eat better, but at this point I credit the stability to staying somewhat active and my metabolism (compliments of the old man, who is one of those "skinny people" who doesn't gain a pound no matter what).
August 23, 2011 5:35:41 AM

New here
Just to say hello. And this is the best site ever. I have been doing this for years now and this site is the best
August 25, 2011 10:44:17 AM

weight is as simple as calories in vs calories out. You need to determine the amount your body need just by resting. 2500 is a good start, cut your cals by 300 per day. Monitor your weight once a week and adjust accordinly. You need to eat 300 cals less per day than your body needs to burn 1lb of fat per week. Obviously you can do cardio to burn cals and do it that way but weight loss can be done by diet alone

Obv cut out the bad stuff if you have any such as:smoking, beer, takeaways etc.
Its good to have 1 cheat day per week such as a takeaway as this throws your body off the routine. Eat healthy.
August 25, 2011 10:48:02 AM

the pros do cutting and bulking phases for muscle growth, cut for summer, bulk in winter.
September 8, 2011 4:14:11 AM

If you eat so many but you want stay fit, my advice is do the DVD for Exercise. Many Kinds of routines and instrunctions you will get.
September 29, 2011 11:40:47 AM

anderson9731 said:
Massage has been used for many years as a healing therapy and benefits the body as a whole in a number of ways. Sports massage works predominantly to alleviate the buildup of stress and tension which occurs in the soft tissues of the body during physical activity.


If you google that phrase there's at least a page full of hits for it. Someone has found Ctrl+C Ctrl+V
December 20, 2011 3:29:40 PM

Best way to eat better is to stop drinking soft drinks, desserts, treats and goodies. Change them with water, fruit and crazy. This is the best step, getting rid of enhanced sweets is critical to a healthy life. Weight is mostly determined by eating plan. Also making changes to your eating plan plan is much easier than trying to get to the gym every other day.
December 22, 2011 9:00:08 PM

These aren’t the newest techniques from the latest cutting-edge plan. Rather, they are simple, time-tested, no nonsense habits that you need to get into when designing a good eating program.

1. Eat every 2-3 hours, no matter what. You should eat between 5-8 meals per day.

2. Eat complete (containing all the essential amino acids), lean protein with each meal.

3. Eat fruits and/or vegetables with each food meal.

4. Ensure that your carbohydrate intake comes from fruits and vegetables. Exception: workout and post-workout drinks and meals.

5. Ensure that 25-35% of your energy intake comes from fat, with your fat intake split equally between saturates (e.g. animal fat), monounsaturates (e.g., olive oil), and polyunsaturates (e.g. flax oil, salmon oil).

6. Drink only non-calorie containing beverages, the best choices being water and green tea.

7. Eat mostly whole foods (except workout and post-workout drinks).
So what about calories, or macronutrient ratios... The short answer is that if you aren’t already practicing the above-mentioned habits, and by practicing them I mean putting them to use over 90% of the time (i.e., no more than 4 meals out of an average 42 meals per week violate any of those rules), everything else is pretty pointless.

Many people can achieve the health and the body composition they desire following these 7 rules alone.

January 31, 2012 1:24:19 AM

wanamingo said:
Um im kind of offended.

I dont drink soda, havent had high fructose corn syrup for quite some time (~3 years), I have an almost completely organic diet, I dont eat sweets too often (Once a week). I have red Meat maybe 2-3 times a month (GF is a vegetarian, so this helps). I do booze more often then i should, My carb intake is a bit high (But im working on it).

Im an assistant network admin and I went from being very physically active at my old job to literally sitting for 8 hours a day. What I wanted was some info on how I could ease my way into exercising.


Do you have an Ipod? Load it up with your favorite music. Find a treadmill and run till it hurts. One hour a day, five days a week. That will keep the weight off, I promise. And lay off the beer.
January 31, 2012 1:41:45 AM

1-2 drinks per day is supposedly beneficial to cardiovascular health. My Dr. has suggested I drink a beer every day. I try to, but don't always think about it. And, although it's not much more than water, I drink the lowest calorie beer I can find, which is 55cal Budweiser Select; just to get the benefits from the alcohol (when I drink a beer to enjoy the beer, it's something as dark as possible, like a Guinness Stout).
February 27, 2012 4:59:23 PM

Eat more often instead of having a big lunch.

If you eat healthy already and find you are gaining weight, it is because the portion is too large. Healthy or not, too much will result in weight gain. A big issue with NFL players after retiring is more weight gain. They're used to eating a large portion of food but no longer require that much. In order to control portions I would eat more often during the day but smaller groups. Snack here and there. Feed the fire to keep it going, but not too strong, and not too weak.

Run to the end of your street, do 10 push ups, run back. That's more exercise than most get in an entire week.

You can convert your desk to a 'standing desk' which will correct posture and burn more calories along with other health benefits. Some people would say sit on a swiss ball, but that's just going to make you a joke at work. The standing desk will work better. Put a nice mat under your feet as well, one of those anti-fatigue mats.

The general thought is that pound per pound, 1lbs of muscle burns around 10 calories more than 1 pound of fat does. Others will argue 1lbs of muscle = 50 calories an hour but do the math and you'll realize they're idiots. :) 

1 lbs of fat = 3600 calories. It takes some time to get there. It'll take some time to remove it as well.

If you have a standard work day, don't eat anything after 9pm. Keep hydrated by drinking a lot of water, especially prior to going to bed when you dehydrate the most.

When you start hitting your 30s or early 30s, you start losing muscle faster and often replace that with fat. Your weight may stay the same, but judge by how your close fit or how you belt is doing. These things stretch but weight is not a good indicator.

Based on my weight I am morbidly obese according to the Body Mass Index. I am in better shape than many people, though the last couple years I've found myself focusing more on work and less on exercise because of time constraints.

Your legs are the largest muscle group in your body. Sitting down, you don't use them as much. First, you lose the extra calorie burn from moving. Second, your muscles will weaken to accomodate the seditary lifestyle, so you lose more of the calorie burning effects. A simple solution would be to do a few sets of 10-15 reps of body weight squats. Simple enough and it doesn't require a gym. Doesn't require anything except that you do them.

Watch what you eat, never go cold turkey, and feed your cravings. Have a small thing of dessert after dinner. It will trigger your mind that feeding it over, removing any further cravings, as opposed to not eating anything.
April 18, 2013 3:39:37 AM

Well if you want to fit your body so the best way to eat, better is to stop beverages, sweets, snacks. Drink plenty of water every day. Also making changes to your diet strategy, is much simpler than trying to get to the gym every other day.
July 10, 2013 5:04:05 PM

I aint gonna pick your diet apart, i take you had a little more active job previously?

My best guess your eating the same amount, but not as active. :)  eat less.
!