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Watch Out!! - Cheap heatsink broke my A7V/1.1 Tbrd

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Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
December 14, 2000 9:56:05 AM

All,
I am glad Toms Hardware did a cooler review. I just had a bad experience with a generic cooler that I wanted to pass on to all:
After picking up an ASUS A7V, Athlon 1.1Ghz, 512Mb Micron, GeFo... oh you get the point from Mwave.com, I had the system put together in about and hour or so. Initially I did have problems getting the CPU to run at 1100Mhz, but after reducing the FSB to 95Mhz, it seemed happy (had to disable the auto config feature and set the speed manually). About an hour into installing WinME, I heard a loud 'POP', which immediately turned my attention to the computer. Low and behold, I could see that the heat sink had appeared to simply come loose. Almost exactly 3-4 seconds later, the computer died (yep, heat-buildup fried my 1.1Ghz). I simply could not get it turned off quick enough. What really happened was that the blasted CLIP that holds the CPU cooler on was SO tightly sprung, it broke one of the little tabs on the Socket 462. ARGH!!!
In any case, after some haggling with mwave.com, they agreed to 'look at it' and swap the needed components. Initially, the automaton that I was speaking to kept saying, "physical dmg is not covered". I explained that it was their cheap heat sink that got me into this situation and they agreed to RMA it.
To make a long story short - Watch out for Cheezy heat sinks! (I'll be getting a Global Win FOP32-I/Artic Silver Thermal Xfer Compound to keep this from happening again).

Regards,
Frank Z.

If you have any comments - especially if I did something obviously wrong - please let me know!
Also - what do you think of the combo I am suggesting?
December 15, 2000 6:27:54 PM

"What really happened was that the blasted CLIP that holds the CPU cooler on was SO tightly sprung, it broke one of the little tabs on the Socket 462. ARGH!!!"

Just to let you know a t-bird is a socket A not 462. Could be why it broke.

Jeff
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
December 15, 2000 6:36:36 PM

I appreciate the feedback, but if you check out a Socket A board, you will see the designation 'Socket 462' on the socket. the two are one and the same, just different designations. In any case, this has only happened to me from what I am gathering, so I hope it was just one of those things.

Frank
December 15, 2000 10:26:37 PM

jeffg007, just to let you know, the socket A is 462, this is the number of pins the socket A processor has.

Now, as the the original post. Sorry to hear about the chip. I would suggest this to you and everyone else. Modify the clip on the heatsink. I read somewhere that those clips put 30 lbs. of pressure on your chip. Would you put 30 lbs. of weights on that little processor? No.
I have a GlobalWin FOP32-1 and I had to modify it. What I mean by this is take off the fan so that the clip comes out of the heatsink. Then take a pair of plyers and bend the clip so that it is more flat instead of the 45 degree angle that it is. I bend mine until it is mostly flat, this way there is no where near as much pressure on that fragile little core. It still touches the core and is still nice and snug so you don't have to worry about poor heat transfers.
But again, just a warning, you still should bend the clip on the GlobalWin heatsink/fan.
I would rather destroy a $20 heatsink than destroy a $200 chip.
Use your best judgement, if it looks like it is too tight and it feels too tight then it probably is. You shouldn't always trust the manufacturer of your computer parts, modify them if they need it.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
December 17, 2000 1:07:19 AM

Actually ALL socket a HSF should put at least 20lb of pressure. This is because the four rubber pads on the proc is above the core. You need that much pressure to even make contact with the core. By bending the clip or removing and reattaching the HS, it efectively weakens the clip and the HS wont make contact with the proc core.
December 17, 2000 1:35:41 AM

Sorry, but I must disagree. Those pads may be slightly higher but they are very soft, certainly not firm enough to keep the heatsink from touching the core. You could practically place the heatsink on the chip without the clip and the weight of the heatsink is enough to push the pads down.
Please do what you think is best for your chip. This is only my opinion. I have a Duron 600 overclocked to 950 and my temp is just fine. I bent the heck out of the clip so it wouldn't crack the core. There is still enough of an angle in the clip to provide some pressure but not enough to break anything.
All HSFs should put at least 20lbs of pressure? Tell that to the original starter of this thread. He knows exactly what 20lbs of pressure can do.
December 17, 2000 2:51:24 AM

That sucks dude... at least they agreed to take it back.

-MP Jesse
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
December 17, 2000 6:40:03 PM

Thank you for the continued feedback. Mwave has not said they would take it back for a swap yet, but they did give me an RMA to send it back so they could look at it. I did pay by credit card, so if they want to be a hard ass about it, I'll push it through the credit card company. Oh gee, I'm not too bitter about this...lol.
Anyway, I have a thought....when you look at a Socket 462, you'll notice there are THREE tabs per side. I would imagine that it would not take a great engineering feat to devise a clip that could simultaneously engage all three tabs at the same time....wonder why no one has done this...?
Probably because I'm the only one who's had this issue...
Finally, you'll bet I'll bend the spring on the FOP32 I have coming to keep this from happening again. I can't imagine that level of force is really needed....
I'll update this thread when there is resolution to this issue...

Regards,
Frank
December 17, 2000 8:06:29 PM

I do have a golden orb (462) that clips on to all three tabs. But this does not reduce the pressure on to the core. I bent the clip on the golden orb as well because many people reported to be cracking the core using this HSF. The old golden orbs, like I used before, have a round bottom instead of square so they are not supported by the little black pads on the chip, hence they crack the core easier. After bending the clip on the golden orb, I managed to take it on and off several times without ever damaging the core.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 7, 2001 3:23:09 AM

If I remember correctly... the AMD datasheets say that the heat sink should place between 12 and 24lbs of force on the core...

..And just to add a little story of my own... =o)
I had a Tbird 800 burned up because the heat sink fell off. (Actually, it's a waterblock made of an old heat sink.)

Anyway..the hose disconnected from the water pump, so water stopped flowing. Unfortunately, the waterblock was made mainly of silicone, polypropelene, and polystyrene spacers under the home-made clip. These spacers melted, and the heat sink tipped up...oops. :redface:
--To anyone wanting to make a waterblock: don't use plastic... :smile:
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 7, 2001 4:50:25 AM

super orb also has a clip that engages all 3 tabs (on one side anyway). I think the orbs that were damaging the cpus were the onld golden orbs that were for socket370 cpus, the ones you had to twist onto the socket, the new ones don't seems to hurt anything.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 13, 2001 11:08:22 PM

I too had the same problem with a heatsink from Mwave.
I had recently purchased a Athlon Tbird 1Ghz and a Abit KT7-Raid motherboard bundle. While placing the heatsink/fan onto the motherboard I had to use quite a bit of effort and since this is my first time with an Athlon I thought it is probably required to have so strong a clip. A day after installing it one of the sockets tabs broke and the heatsink was no longer in direct contact with my Tbird. I turned off the system after a few seconds when I realized what might have happened and that I no longer had anything on my monitor. It was on for few seconds so I dont know if my cpu was/is damaged but Im sending the board and proc back to mwave today. Now I just need to find a good Heatsink/fan that wont break it again.
Any suggestions?

AMD Athlon 1 Ghz
Abit Kt7-Raid
Enlight 7237/w 300 Watt power supply
Hercules 3d Prophet II MX
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
January 14, 2001 10:53:48 AM

I kinda figured others would have the same issue as me with this heatsink from mwave.com and am glad to actually hear of another case. I guess I was the 1st (lucky me). In any case, mwave swapped out the motherboard, cpu, and provided me with a much higher quality fan and heatsink. I had thought this would be a fight to get this done, but it was done without any hessitation. This really made me suspect that I was not the only one to have suffered from the Mr. Cheezy heatsink with the clip of immeasurible force. I, of course, did not use the second HS they provided me and instead purchased a FOP32 wih Artic Silver (works good --> 45C-50C is the range) from 2cooltek.com (highly recommend this guy). Whatever the case may be, I still recommend mwave to others as this could have easily turned into a drug out fight with my credit card company. You should have no problems getting it swapped out as long as you talk to a tech about it (the Customer service rep initially had told me 'no way' because of physical damage - don't listen to the automoton). If you have any problems with this, I'll try to look up the tech's name, but you should be fine.

Regards,
Frank

1100 Mhz Tbird on A7V
512M Cas2 Crucial (Micron)
Hercules GTS Pro 64M DDR
InWin A500

note - the above combo runs all at 1600x1200x32 smoothly
January 18, 2001 8:57:50 PM

wow! man, I thought Asus a7v had an "auto-switch off" feature...seeing that Amd was too stingy to put that little diode in their chips, I guess it didn't work then. oh, well!
!