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Presario 1245

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Anonymous
September 1, 2004 8:57:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

My 1245 laptop has a few issues. The floppy drive has died and the
battery is dead too. I can live with that (I use the 110 plug all the
time anyway, probably what killed the battery anyway). I figure that a
PCMCIA driven floppy will care for the drive problem.... will it???? Or
should I use a USB external??? What are the pro's and con's??

The battery can be replaced without too much trouble, can it????? Can I
use a lithium (that was an option when I bought it if I remember right)
with the standard charger/power supply??

The hard drive is only a 3.02 gig and that is the big rub. Can I replace
with a larger drive (2 1/2 inch form factor??) and if so what type is it
(EIDE or scuzzy??)
And if I replace it, I can use what size in its place?? With a BIOS
overlay can I go up to about 20 gig or more??

I know, it is old and slow but so am I and I am still working.

Thanks in advance for any and all advice, useful or not.

George

More about : presario 1245

Anonymous
September 2, 2004 2:38:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

George,

Most USB external floppy drives now available conform to the USB 2.0
specification. A USB floppy is not an option for your old computer.

Alternatives include a PCMCIA floppy, which are getting hard to find nowadays,
and simply installing a replacement floppy inside the laptop chassis. The
latter is a viable option only if the drive itself is defective, and not the
controller electronics of the laptop.

Replacement batteries are still available, either from a reputable eBay seller
or a battery supply company like Fedco.

A replacement hard drive would have to be 2.5" form factor. Depending on the
age of the computer, it may well not accept a hard drive larger than 8.4GB, one
of the famous hard drive BIOS limitations that hit every so often in the last
like a brick wall. What type and speed of processor is in the 1245?

It sounds like you might have to spend quite a few bucks to get the laptop where
you want it. A replacement, even used from a good source, may be a more
cost-effective option... Ben Myers

On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 16:57:43 -0500, George Vigneron <gvig@gbronline.com> wrote:

>My 1245 laptop has a few issues. The floppy drive has died and the
>battery is dead too. I can live with that (I use the 110 plug all the
>time anyway, probably what killed the battery anyway). I figure that a
>PCMCIA driven floppy will care for the drive problem.... will it???? Or
>should I use a USB external??? What are the pro's and con's??
>
>The battery can be replaced without too much trouble, can it????? Can I
>use a lithium (that was an option when I bought it if I remember right)
>with the standard charger/power supply??
>
>The hard drive is only a 3.02 gig and that is the big rub. Can I replace
>with a larger drive (2 1/2 inch form factor??) and if so what type is it
>(EIDE or scuzzy??)
>And if I replace it, I can use what size in its place?? With a BIOS
>overlay can I go up to about 20 gig or more??
>
>I know, it is old and slow but so am I and I am still working.
>
>Thanks in advance for any and all advice, useful or not.
>
>George
>
Anonymous
September 2, 2004 2:38:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

Thanks Ben,

The processor is an AMD K6-2 333, slow but effective. I'm slow too (but
some question the effective part).

The floppy acts like the drive mechanism, not the electronics. That is
what it seems like anyway. I have used peripherials that conform to the
USB 2.0 spec with this laptop and they worked, perhaps they were
backwards compatible? I was referring to the external drives that plug
into the PCMCIA slot and are attached with a small cable and use power
from the slot. I saw some the other day in a CDW catalog listing. Seems
they would work without the drive electronics.

As for the batteries, will my charger handle the lithium replacements??

Sorry for all the questions. I am trying to avoid the replacing of the
laptop, perhaps that will be the most cost effective way in the end.

Thanks again.

George

Ben Myers wrote:

>George,
>
>Most USB external floppy drives now available conform to the USB 2.0
>specification. A USB floppy is not an option for your old computer.
>
>Alternatives include a PCMCIA floppy, which are getting hard to find nowadays,
>and simply installing a replacement floppy inside the laptop chassis. The
>latter is a viable option only if the drive itself is defective, and not the
>controller electronics of the laptop.
>
>Replacement batteries are still available, either from a reputable eBay seller
>or a battery supply company like Fedco.
>
>A replacement hard drive would have to be 2.5" form factor. Depending on the
>age of the computer, it may well not accept a hard drive larger than 8.4GB, one
>of the famous hard drive BIOS limitations that hit every so often in the last
>like a brick wall. What type and speed of processor is in the 1245?
>
>It sounds like you might have to spend quite a few bucks to get the laptop where
>you want it. A replacement, even used from a good source, may be a more
>cost-effective option... Ben Myers
>
>On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 16:57:43 -0500, George Vigneron <gvig@gbronline.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>>My 1245 laptop has a few issues. The floppy drive has died and the
>>battery is dead too. I can live with that (I use the 110 plug all the
>>time anyway, probably what killed the battery anyway). I figure that a
>>PCMCIA driven floppy will care for the drive problem.... will it???? Or
>>should I use a USB external??? What are the pro's and con's??
>>
>>The battery can be replaced without too much trouble, can it????? Can I
>>use a lithium (that was an option when I bought it if I remember right)
>>with the standard charger/power supply??
>>
>>The hard drive is only a 3.02 gig and that is the big rub. Can I replace
>>with a larger drive (2 1/2 inch form factor??) and if so what type is it
>>(EIDE or scuzzy??)
>>And if I replace it, I can use what size in its place?? With a BIOS
>>overlay can I go up to about 20 gig or more??
>>
>>I know, it is old and slow but so am I and I am still working.
>>
>>Thanks in advance for any and all advice, useful or not.
>>
>>George
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
September 2, 2004 2:38:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

I'm not an expert in most of your questions, but a USB2 floppy will work
fine. USB2 devices are backwards compatible to USB1.1 (and Ben, come on, I
know you know that).

Tom
"George Vigneron" <gvig@gbronline.com> wrote in message
news:_Jednbvvw_H3_avcRVn-jw@gbronline.com...
> Thanks Ben,
>
> The processor is an AMD K6-2 333, slow but effective. I'm slow too (but
> some question the effective part).
>
> The floppy acts like the drive mechanism, not the electronics. That is
> what it seems like anyway. I have used peripherials that conform to the
> USB 2.0 spec with this laptop and they worked, perhaps they were backwards
> compatible? I was referring to the external drives that plug into the
> PCMCIA slot and are attached with a small cable and use power from the
> slot. I saw some the other day in a CDW catalog listing. Seems they would
> work without the drive electronics.
>
> As for the batteries, will my charger handle the lithium replacements??
>
> Sorry for all the questions. I am trying to avoid the replacing of the
> laptop, perhaps that will be the most cost effective way in the end.
>
> Thanks again.
>
> George
>
> Ben Myers wrote:
>
>>George,
>>
>>Most USB external floppy drives now available conform to the USB 2.0
>>specification. A USB floppy is not an option for your old computer.
>>
>>Alternatives include a PCMCIA floppy, which are getting hard to find
>>nowadays,
>>and simply installing a replacement floppy inside the laptop chassis. The
>>latter is a viable option only if the drive itself is defective, and not
>>the
>>controller electronics of the laptop.
>>
>>Replacement batteries are still available, either from a reputable eBay
>>seller
>>or a battery supply company like Fedco.
>>
>>A replacement hard drive would have to be 2.5" form factor. Depending on
>>the
>>age of the computer, it may well not accept a hard drive larger than
>>8.4GB, one
>>of the famous hard drive BIOS limitations that hit every so often in the
>>last
>>like a brick wall. What type and speed of processor is in the 1245?
>>
>>It sounds like you might have to spend quite a few bucks to get the laptop
>>where
>>you want it. A replacement, even used from a good source, may be a more
>>cost-effective option... Ben Myers
>>
>>On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 16:57:43 -0500, George Vigneron <gvig@gbronline.com>
>>wrote:
>>
>>
>>>My 1245 laptop has a few issues. The floppy drive has died and the
>>>battery is dead too. I can live with that (I use the 110 plug all the
>>>time anyway, probably what killed the battery anyway). I figure that a
>>>PCMCIA driven floppy will care for the drive problem.... will it???? Or
>>>should I use a USB external??? What are the pro's and con's??
>>>
>>>The battery can be replaced without too much trouble, can it????? Can I
>>>use a lithium (that was an option when I bought it if I remember right)
>>>with the standard charger/power supply??
>>>
>>>The hard drive is only a 3.02 gig and that is the big rub. Can I replace
>>>with a larger drive (2 1/2 inch form factor??) and if so what type is it
>>>(EIDE or scuzzy??)
>>>And if I replace it, I can use what size in its place?? With a BIOS
>>>overlay can I go up to about 20 gig or more??
>>>
>>>I know, it is old and slow but so am I and I am still working.
>>>
>>>Thanks in advance for any and all advice, useful or not.
>>>
>>>George
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
September 2, 2004 5:13:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

USB 2.0 devices are backwards compatible to USB1.1, unless they TAKE THEIR POWER
from the USB connector, Tom! If a USB 2.0 device has its own power supply, I
agree 1000% that it will work, albeit more slowly, when plugged into a
functional USB 1.1 slot.

One of the fundamental and important steps taken with USB 2.0 was to supply more
than nominal power (e.g. USB keyboard or mouse) via the USB connector to devices
like hard drives, CD-RW drives, flash memory readers, and yes, even floppy
drives which are also considered relatively high power devices.

In short, a USB 2.0 floppy drive may not work when plugged into a USB 1.1
computer. Or maybe it will. Depends on its power consumption. I've had some
deeply disappointed clients who tried a USB 2.0 device in a relatively new USB
1.1 notebook and found it would not work. Disappointed not by me, but by their
attempts to use incompatible technology which seems to be perfectly compatible.

Neither of us is 100% in stating the absolute of will or will not work. Too
many variables... Ben Myers

On Wed, 1 Sep 2004 20:50:13 -0400, "Tom Scales" <tomtoo@softhome.net> wrote:

>I'm not an expert in most of your questions, but a USB2 floppy will work
>fine. USB2 devices are backwards compatible to USB1.1 (and Ben, come on, I
>know you know that).
>
>Tom
>"George Vigneron" <gvig@gbronline.com> wrote in message
>news:_Jednbvvw_H3_avcRVn-jw@gbronline.com...
>> Thanks Ben,
>>
>> The processor is an AMD K6-2 333, slow but effective. I'm slow too (but
>> some question the effective part).
>>
>> The floppy acts like the drive mechanism, not the electronics. That is
>> what it seems like anyway. I have used peripherials that conform to the
>> USB 2.0 spec with this laptop and they worked, perhaps they were backwards
>> compatible? I was referring to the external drives that plug into the
>> PCMCIA slot and are attached with a small cable and use power from the
>> slot. I saw some the other day in a CDW catalog listing. Seems they would
>> work without the drive electronics.
>>
>> As for the batteries, will my charger handle the lithium replacements??
>>
>> Sorry for all the questions. I am trying to avoid the replacing of the
>> laptop, perhaps that will be the most cost effective way in the end.
>>
>> Thanks again.
>>
>> George
>>
>> Ben Myers wrote:
>>
>>>George,
>>>
>>>Most USB external floppy drives now available conform to the USB 2.0
>>>specification. A USB floppy is not an option for your old computer.
>>>
>>>Alternatives include a PCMCIA floppy, which are getting hard to find
>>>nowadays,
>>>and simply installing a replacement floppy inside the laptop chassis. The
>>>latter is a viable option only if the drive itself is defective, and not
>>>the
>>>controller electronics of the laptop.
>>>
>>>Replacement batteries are still available, either from a reputable eBay
>>>seller
>>>or a battery supply company like Fedco.
>>>
>>>A replacement hard drive would have to be 2.5" form factor. Depending on
>>>the
>>>age of the computer, it may well not accept a hard drive larger than
>>>8.4GB, one
>>>of the famous hard drive BIOS limitations that hit every so often in the
>>>last
>>>like a brick wall. What type and speed of processor is in the 1245?
>>>
>>>It sounds like you might have to spend quite a few bucks to get the laptop
>>>where
>>>you want it. A replacement, even used from a good source, may be a more
>>>cost-effective option... Ben Myers
>>>
>>>On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 16:57:43 -0500, George Vigneron <gvig@gbronline.com>
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>My 1245 laptop has a few issues. The floppy drive has died and the
>>>>battery is dead too. I can live with that (I use the 110 plug all the
>>>>time anyway, probably what killed the battery anyway). I figure that a
>>>>PCMCIA driven floppy will care for the drive problem.... will it???? Or
>>>>should I use a USB external??? What are the pro's and con's??
>>>>
>>>>The battery can be replaced without too much trouble, can it????? Can I
>>>>use a lithium (that was an option when I bought it if I remember right)
>>>>with the standard charger/power supply??
>>>>
>>>>The hard drive is only a 3.02 gig and that is the big rub. Can I replace
>>>>with a larger drive (2 1/2 inch form factor??) and if so what type is it
>>>>(EIDE or scuzzy??)
>>>>And if I replace it, I can use what size in its place?? With a BIOS
>>>>overlay can I go up to about 20 gig or more??
>>>>
>>>>I know, it is old and slow but so am I and I am still working.
>>>>
>>>>Thanks in advance for any and all advice, useful or not.
>>>>
>>>>George
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
September 2, 2004 10:25:40 AM

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

Thanks guys, I am considering what I should do about this. Now I have
some information to act on.

Tom Scales wrote:

>I'm not an expert in most of your questions, but a USB2 floppy will work
>fine. USB2 devices are backwards compatible to USB1.1 (and Ben, come on, I
>know you know that).
>
>Tom
>"George Vigneron" <gvig@gbronline.com> wrote in message
>news:_Jednbvvw_H3_avcRVn-jw@gbronline.com...
>
>
>>Thanks Ben,
>>
>>The processor is an AMD K6-2 333, slow but effective. I'm slow too (but
>>some question the effective part).
>>
>>The floppy acts like the drive mechanism, not the electronics. That is
>>what it seems like anyway. I have used peripherials that conform to the
>>USB 2.0 spec with this laptop and they worked, perhaps they were backwards
>>compatible? I was referring to the external drives that plug into the
>>PCMCIA slot and are attached with a small cable and use power from the
>>slot. I saw some the other day in a CDW catalog listing. Seems they would
>>work without the drive electronics.
>>
>>As for the batteries, will my charger handle the lithium replacements??
>>
>>Sorry for all the questions. I am trying to avoid the replacing of the
>>laptop, perhaps that will be the most cost effective way in the end.
>>
>>Thanks again.
>>
>>George
>>
>>Ben Myers wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>George,
>>>
>>>Most USB external floppy drives now available conform to the USB 2.0
>>>specification. A USB floppy is not an option for your old computer.
>>>
>>>Alternatives include a PCMCIA floppy, which are getting hard to find
>>>nowadays,
>>>and simply installing a replacement floppy inside the laptop chassis. The
>>>latter is a viable option only if the drive itself is defective, and not
>>>the
>>>controller electronics of the laptop.
>>>
>>>Replacement batteries are still available, either from a reputable eBay
>>>seller
>>>or a battery supply company like Fedco.
>>>
>>>A replacement hard drive would have to be 2.5" form factor. Depending on
>>>the
>>>age of the computer, it may well not accept a hard drive larger than
>>>8.4GB, one
>>>of the famous hard drive BIOS limitations that hit every so often in the
>>>last
>>>like a brick wall. What type and speed of processor is in the 1245?
>>>
>>>It sounds like you might have to spend quite a few bucks to get the laptop
>>>where
>>>you want it. A replacement, even used from a good source, may be a more
>>>cost-effective option... Ben Myers
>>>
>>>On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 16:57:43 -0500, George Vigneron <gvig@gbronline.com>
>>>wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>My 1245 laptop has a few issues. The floppy drive has died and the
>>>>battery is dead too. I can live with that (I use the 110 plug all the
>>>>time anyway, probably what killed the battery anyway). I figure that a
>>>>PCMCIA driven floppy will care for the drive problem.... will it???? Or
>>>>should I use a USB external??? What are the pro's and con's??
>>>>
>>>>The battery can be replaced without too much trouble, can it????? Can I
>>>>use a lithium (that was an option when I bought it if I remember right)
>>>>with the standard charger/power supply??
>>>>
>>>>The hard drive is only a 3.02 gig and that is the big rub. Can I replace
>>>>with a larger drive (2 1/2 inch form factor??) and if so what type is it
>>>>(EIDE or scuzzy??)
>>>>And if I replace it, I can use what size in its place?? With a BIOS
>>>>overlay can I go up to about 20 gig or more??
>>>>
>>>>I know, it is old and slow but so am I and I am still working.
>>>>
>>>>Thanks in advance for any and all advice, useful or not.
>>>>
>>>>George
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>
>
>
>
!