Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Since I'm NOT gonna call CS !

Last response: in Network Providers
Share
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 4:00:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and there was trouble
ticket after trouble ticket for my local tower (problem never solved)--many
times my phone will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it will
notify me immediately. The caller generally hears maybe 3 rings, so it
isn't like they get the VM immediately.

Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx" question, when I first
posted about my 4400 doing this (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that.
It really didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to happen in
a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as far as I can tell, anyway).

Thanks for any feedback,

Janie

More about : gonna call

Anonymous
January 28, 2005 4:00:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Janie Collins wrote:
> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
> immediately.
>
> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
> far as I can tell, anyway).
>
> Thanks for any feedback,

Just a guess.
Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
Call goes to voice mail.
Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
the tower.

This could be completely wrong and confused...

Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
*locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
has actually been established or not.

-Quick
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 6:33:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter that this
even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?


"Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
> Janie Collins wrote:
>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>> immediately.
>>
>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>
>> Thanks for any feedback,
>
> Just a guess.
> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
> Call goes to voice mail.
> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
> the tower.
>
> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>
> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
> has actually been established or not.
>
> -Quick
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 7:37:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

It wouldn't fit for CDMA if you have a good signal.

-Quick

Janie Collins wrote:
> Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter
> that this even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?
>
>
> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>>> immediately.
>>>
>>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>>
>>> Thanks for any feedback,
>>
>> Just a guess.
>> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
>> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
>> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
>> Call goes to voice mail.
>> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
>> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
>> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
>> the tower.
>>
>> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>>
>> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
>> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
>> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
>> has actually been established or not.
>>
>> -Quick
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 7:59:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Now Quick, remember that I really don't know any technical stuff (although I
did "Ask Jeeves" what "CDMA" is--I'm trying :) . Since my signal was that
good, does it possibly mean it would be the tower rather than my phone?

Thanks!

"Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:xkjKd.15816$wZ2.1286@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
> It wouldn't fit for CDMA if you have a good signal.
>
> -Quick
>
> Janie Collins wrote:
>> Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter
>> that this even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?
>>
>>
>> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>>>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>>>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>>>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>>>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>>>> immediately.
>>>>
>>>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>>>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>>>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>>>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>>>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>>>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>>>
>>>> Thanks for any feedback,
>>>
>>> Just a guess.
>>> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
>>> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
>>> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
>>> Call goes to voice mail.
>>> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
>>> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
>>> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
>>> the tower.
>>>
>>> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>>>
>>> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
>>> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
>>> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
>>> has actually been established or not.
>>>
>>> -Quick
>
>
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 10:48:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Don't worry. I don't know much about it either.

Try this. The capacity of the radio part of cellular telephony is
determined by bandwidth. Providers get allocated bandwidth.

How you use that bandwidth determines capacity (how many
calls you can handle at a time).

CDMA kinda sticks everybody in one big pipe. Each user
gets an ID to distinguish their call/data from every other user's
call/data. When the pipe gets full you just sort of make it shorter
so that it reaches fewer people. You use all your bandwidth but
you shrink or grow the size of your cell. So if you have a good
signal you should be able to make a call. kinda, i think...

With all the other cellular radio interface technologies they statically
allocate the bandwidth. You make a call and you get your own tiny
little pipe. Enough tiny little pipes equal the really big pipe and you've
used all your bandwidth. So you limit the number of users to the
number of little pipes you have and you keep your cell the same size
all the time. With these types of cell service (TDMA, GSM, etc) you
can have a really good signal but you can't make a call. They have
one pipe (paging channel?) that they broadcast to everyone(?). You
pick this up fine but when you use it to get your own tiny pipe for a
call you get rejected. The call gets rejected if its coming to your phone.

So that's why I think that if you have a full CDMA signal you should
be able to make and receive calls. If the signal shows as extremely
weak or non-existent you may not be able to make a call but still
receive a page or data over the paging channel. If you say you have
a full signal then your phone should ring and you should be able to
answer the call...

On the other hand I may have forgotten what little I may have known
about this. I'm sure someone else can give you a better explanation.

-Quick

Janie Collins wrote:
> Now Quick, remember that I really don't know any technical stuff
> (although I did "Ask Jeeves" what "CDMA" is--I'm trying :) . Since my
> signal was that good, does it possibly mean it would be the tower
> rather than my phone?
> Thanks!
>
> "Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:xkjKd.15816$wZ2.1286@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>> It wouldn't fit for CDMA if you have a good signal.
>>
>> -Quick
>>
>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>> Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter
>>> that this even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?
>>>
>>>
>>> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>> news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
>>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>>>>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>>>>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>>>>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>>>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>>>>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>>>>> immediately.
>>>>>
>>>>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>>>>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>>>>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>>>>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>>>>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>>>>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks for any feedback,
>>>>
>>>> Just a guess.
>>>> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
>>>> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
>>>> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
>>>> Call goes to voice mail.
>>>> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
>>>> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
>>>> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
>>>> the tower.
>>>>
>>>> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>>>>
>>>> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
>>>> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
>>>> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
>>>> has actually been established or not.
>>>>
>>>> -Quick
Anonymous
January 28, 2005 5:24:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Sounds to me like you know a lot! Thanks for the explanation.

By the way, I'm NOT gonna change phones because I like the way the LGs work
(although I am currently on version 1 software and awaiting the update for
the 6100), but am curious (since I really don't fully understand all this)
if a Moto 265 would probably act the same as my 6100. The reason I ask is
that there are posts on here raving about the wonderful reception of the
265.

Thanks so much!

"Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:v7mKd.17232$5R.17076@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
> Don't worry. I don't know much about it either.
>
> Try this. The capacity of the radio part of cellular telephony is
> determined by bandwidth. Providers get allocated bandwidth.
>
> How you use that bandwidth determines capacity (how many
> calls you can handle at a time).
>
> CDMA kinda sticks everybody in one big pipe. Each user
> gets an ID to distinguish their call/data from every other user's
> call/data. When the pipe gets full you just sort of make it shorter
> so that it reaches fewer people. You use all your bandwidth but
> you shrink or grow the size of your cell. So if you have a good
> signal you should be able to make a call. kinda, i think...
>
> With all the other cellular radio interface technologies they statically
> allocate the bandwidth. You make a call and you get your own tiny
> little pipe. Enough tiny little pipes equal the really big pipe and you've
> used all your bandwidth. So you limit the number of users to the
> number of little pipes you have and you keep your cell the same size
> all the time. With these types of cell service (TDMA, GSM, etc) you
> can have a really good signal but you can't make a call. They have
> one pipe (paging channel?) that they broadcast to everyone(?). You
> pick this up fine but when you use it to get your own tiny pipe for a
> call you get rejected. The call gets rejected if its coming to your phone.
>
> So that's why I think that if you have a full CDMA signal you should
> be able to make and receive calls. If the signal shows as extremely
> weak or non-existent you may not be able to make a call but still
> receive a page or data over the paging channel. If you say you have
> a full signal then your phone should ring and you should be able to
> answer the call...
>
> On the other hand I may have forgotten what little I may have known
> about this. I'm sure someone else can give you a better explanation.
>
> -Quick
>
> Janie Collins wrote:
>> Now Quick, remember that I really don't know any technical stuff
>> (although I did "Ask Jeeves" what "CDMA" is--I'm trying :) . Since my
>> signal was that good, does it possibly mean it would be the tower
>> rather than my phone?
>> Thanks!
>>
>> "Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:xkjKd.15816$wZ2.1286@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>>> It wouldn't fit for CDMA if you have a good signal.
>>>
>>> -Quick
>>>
>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>> Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter
>>>> that this even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
>>>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>>>>>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>>>>>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>>>>>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>>>>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>>>>>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>>>>>> immediately.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>>>>>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>>>>>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>>>>>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>>>>>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>>>>>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Thanks for any feedback,
>>>>>
>>>>> Just a guess.
>>>>> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
>>>>> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
>>>>> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
>>>>> Call goes to voice mail.
>>>>> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
>>>>> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
>>>>> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
>>>>> the tower.
>>>>>
>>>>> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>>>>>
>>>>> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
>>>>> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
>>>>> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
>>>>> has actually been established or not.
>>>>>
>>>>> -Quick
>
>
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 6:23:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Are you near a body of water? I was having similar issues of dropped calls and
the phone going right to voicemail. I'd also have the phone bounce from full
1x strength to 1 bar and then back to full strength consistently. Apparently,
water can cause havoc wtih radio signals, creating "echoes" which confuse both
the phone and the tower. That's what was explained to me anyway.

"Janie Collins" <jjcollins@triad.rr.com> wrote:
>Sounds to me like you know a lot! Thanks for the explanation.
>
>By the way, I'm NOT gonna change phones because I like the way the LGs work
>(although I am currently on version 1 software and awaiting the update for
>the 6100), but am curious (since I really don't fully understand all this)
>if a Moto 265 would probably act the same as my 6100. The reason I ask is
>that there are posts on here raving about the wonderful reception of the
>265.
>
>Thanks so much!
>
>"Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>news:v7mKd.17232$5R.17076@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
>> Don't worry. I don't know much about it either.
>>
>> Try this. The capacity of the radio part of cellular telephony is
>> determined by bandwidth. Providers get allocated bandwidth.
>>
>> How you use that bandwidth determines capacity (how many
>> calls you can handle at a time).
>>
>> CDMA kinda sticks everybody in one big pipe. Each user
>> gets an ID to distinguish their call/data from every other user's
>> call/data. When the pipe gets full you just sort of make it shorter
>> so that it reaches fewer people. You use all your bandwidth but
>> you shrink or grow the size of your cell. So if you have a good
>> signal you should be able to make a call. kinda, i think...
>>
>> With all the other cellular radio interface technologies they statically
>> allocate the bandwidth. You make a call and you get your own tiny
>> little pipe. Enough tiny little pipes equal the really big pipe and you've
>> used all your bandwidth. So you limit the number of users to the
>> number of little pipes you have and you keep your cell the same size
>> all the time. With these types of cell service (TDMA, GSM, etc) you
>> can have a really good signal but you can't make a call. They have
>> one pipe (paging channel?) that they broadcast to everyone(?). You
>> pick this up fine but when you use it to get your own tiny pipe for a
>> call you get rejected. The call gets rejected if its coming to your phone.
>>
>> So that's why I think that if you have a full CDMA signal you should
>> be able to make and receive calls. If the signal shows as extremely
>> weak or non-existent you may not be able to make a call but still
>> receive a page or data over the paging channel. If you say you have
>> a full signal then your phone should ring and you should be able to
>> answer the call...
>>
>> On the other hand I may have forgotten what little I may have known
>> about this. I'm sure someone else can give you a better explanation.
>>
>> -Quick
>>
>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>> Now Quick, remember that I really don't know any technical stuff
>>> (although I did "Ask Jeeves" what "CDMA" is--I'm trying :) . Since my
>>> signal was that good, does it possibly mean it would be the tower
>>> rather than my phone?
>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>> "Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>> news:xkjKd.15816$wZ2.1286@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>>>> It wouldn't fit for CDMA if you have a good signal.
>>>>
>>>> -Quick
>>>>
>>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>>> Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter
>>>>> that this even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>>> news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
>>>>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>>>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>>>>>>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>>>>>>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>>>>>>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>>>>>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>>>>>>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>>>>>>> immediately.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>>>>>>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>>>>>>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>>>>>>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>>>>>>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>>>>>>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Thanks for any feedback,
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Just a guess.
>>>>>> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
>>>>>> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
>>>>>> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
>>>>>> Call goes to voice mail.
>>>>>> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
>>>>>> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
>>>>>> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
>>>>>> the tower.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
>>>>>> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
>>>>>> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
>>>>>> has actually been established or not.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> -Quick
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 7, 2005 9:26:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

No, I'm not too close to any major bodies of water, probably a pond and a
creek around the development which used to have a golf course nearby.

Thanks for the input, however.

<dontwantspam@noneedtoemailme.com> wrote in message
news:SJLNd.12976$xh.5591@fe54.usenetserver.com...
> Are you near a body of water? I was having similar issues of dropped
> calls and
> the phone going right to voicemail. I'd also have the phone bounce from
> full
> 1x strength to 1 bar and then back to full strength consistently.
> Apparently,
> water can cause havoc wtih radio signals, creating "echoes" which confuse
> both
> the phone and the tower. That's what was explained to me anyway.
>
> "Janie Collins" <jjcollins@triad.rr.com> wrote:
>>Sounds to me like you know a lot! Thanks for the explanation.
>>
>>By the way, I'm NOT gonna change phones because I like the way the LGs
>>work
>>(although I am currently on version 1 software and awaiting the update for
>>the 6100), but am curious (since I really don't fully understand all this)
>>if a Moto 265 would probably act the same as my 6100. The reason I ask is
>>that there are posts on here raving about the wonderful reception of the
>>265.
>>
>>Thanks so much!
>>
>>"Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>news:v7mKd.17232$5R.17076@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
>>> Don't worry. I don't know much about it either.
>>>
>>> Try this. The capacity of the radio part of cellular telephony is
>>> determined by bandwidth. Providers get allocated bandwidth.
>>>
>>> How you use that bandwidth determines capacity (how many
>>> calls you can handle at a time).
>>>
>>> CDMA kinda sticks everybody in one big pipe. Each user
>>> gets an ID to distinguish their call/data from every other user's
>>> call/data. When the pipe gets full you just sort of make it shorter
>>> so that it reaches fewer people. You use all your bandwidth but
>>> you shrink or grow the size of your cell. So if you have a good
>>> signal you should be able to make a call. kinda, i think...
>>>
>>> With all the other cellular radio interface technologies they statically
>>> allocate the bandwidth. You make a call and you get your own tiny
>>> little pipe. Enough tiny little pipes equal the really big pipe and
>>> you've
>>> used all your bandwidth. So you limit the number of users to the
>>> number of little pipes you have and you keep your cell the same size
>>> all the time. With these types of cell service (TDMA, GSM, etc) you
>>> can have a really good signal but you can't make a call. They have
>>> one pipe (paging channel?) that they broadcast to everyone(?). You
>>> pick this up fine but when you use it to get your own tiny pipe for a
>>> call you get rejected. The call gets rejected if its coming to your
>>> phone.
>>>
>>> So that's why I think that if you have a full CDMA signal you should
>>> be able to make and receive calls. If the signal shows as extremely
>>> weak or non-existent you may not be able to make a call but still
>>> receive a page or data over the paging channel. If you say you have
>>> a full signal then your phone should ring and you should be able to
>>> answer the call...
>>>
>>> On the other hand I may have forgotten what little I may have known
>>> about this. I'm sure someone else can give you a better explanation.
>>>
>>> -Quick
>>>
>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>> Now Quick, remember that I really don't know any technical stuff
>>>> (although I did "Ask Jeeves" what "CDMA" is--I'm trying :) . Since my
>>>> signal was that good, does it possibly mean it would be the tower
>>>> rather than my phone?
>>>> Thanks!
>>>>
>>>> "Quick" <Quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>> news:xkjKd.15816$wZ2.1286@newssvr13.news.prodigy.com...
>>>>> It wouldn't fit for CDMA if you have a good signal.
>>>>>
>>>>> -Quick
>>>>>
>>>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>>>> Thanks, Quick. When you refer to signal strength, would it matter
>>>>>> that this even happens where I have a full 1X signal on my phone?
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> "Quick" <quick7135-news@NOSPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
>>>>>> news:1106877752.885860@sj-nntpcache-5...
>>>>>>> Janie Collins wrote:
>>>>>>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and
>>>>>>>> there was trouble ticket after trouble ticket for my
>>>>>>>> local tower (problem never solved)--many times my phone
>>>>>>>> will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>>>>>>> will notify me immediately. The caller generally hears
>>>>>>>> maybe 3 rings, so it isn't like they get the VM
>>>>>>>> immediately.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Any ideas? That is one reason I asked the "RF/Rx"
>>>>>>>> question, when I first posted about my 4400 doing this
>>>>>>>> (well over a year ago), Josh mentioned that. It really
>>>>>>>> didn't seem to be my phone, however, as it only seems to
>>>>>>>> happen in a 3 mile radius around my home tower (well, as
>>>>>>>> far as I can tell, anyway).
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Thanks for any feedback,
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Just a guess.
>>>>>>> Your phone is still registered with the network (otherwise the
>>>>>>> caller would probably go directly to voice mail) but doesn't
>>>>>>> have the signal strength back to the tower to establish a call.
>>>>>>> Call goes to voice mail.
>>>>>>> Voice mail notification goes over the paging channel which
>>>>>>> is one way and "stronger". The phone can receive it even
>>>>>>> when it can't establish a voice channel for a call back to
>>>>>>> the tower.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> This could be completely wrong and confused...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Note: Never count the number of rings. Rings are generated
>>>>>>> *locally* and independent of the other end actually ringing
>>>>>>> or not. They also do not indicate that a bearer (voice) channel
>>>>>>> has actually been established or not.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> -Quick
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
February 14, 2005 5:09:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Janie Collins wrote:

> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and there was trouble
> ticket after trouble ticket for my local tower (problem never solved)--many
> times my phone will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it will
> notify me immediately. The caller generally hears maybe 3 rings, so it
> isn't like they get the VM immediately.

Happens all the time. I'll be right next to my phone all day and no
rings when all of a sudden I get a VM notification! I've also had a rash
of people say they have tried to call and not gotten an answer.

Oh well.

-Pete
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 2:33:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:09:39 -0500, speedy <seedy@raex.com> wrote:

>
>
>Janie Collins wrote:
>
>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and there was trouble
>> ticket after trouble ticket for my local tower (problem never solved)--many
>> times my phone will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it will
>> notify me immediately. The caller generally hears maybe 3 rings, so it
>> isn't like they get the VM immediately.
>
>Happens all the time. I'll be right next to my phone all day and no
>rings when all of a sudden I get a VM notification! I've also had a rash
>of people say they have tried to call and not gotten an answer.
>
>Oh well.
>
>-Pete
I recently experienced the same problem with a LG VX3200 phone. Phone
doesn't ring, voice mail received but no alert ring to the VM, double
checked my setting under "sounds".

Powered the phone off, then on again as in "reboot". Things went back
to normal.

Me thinks we have a software problem? :) 

BTW, normal I leave my phone powered on 24/7. Looks like an
occasional reboot is necessary. Since when did LG start using
Windows? :) 

- Sandy
February 15, 2005 4:29:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Me 3.

LG VX3200

Phone sometimes doesn't ring, voice mail received or missed call indication,
but no alert ring. When I look at the screen, I see the text alert.

I have had the phone for about 9 months and this has happened maybe 6 times.
No discernable pattern (yet).



"Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
news:q1d211hsgcqp11k4051oovpt0mpla88gct@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:09:39 -0500, speedy <seedy@raex.com> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>>Janie Collins wrote:
>>
>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and there was trouble
>>> ticket after trouble ticket for my local tower (problem never
>>> solved)--many
>>> times my phone will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>> will
>>> notify me immediately. The caller generally hears maybe 3 rings, so it
>>> isn't like they get the VM immediately.
>>
>>Happens all the time. I'll be right next to my phone all day and no
>>rings when all of a sudden I get a VM notification! I've also had a rash
>>of people say they have tried to call and not gotten an answer.
>>
>>Oh well.
>>
>>-Pete
> I recently experienced the same problem with a LG VX3200 phone. Phone
> doesn't ring, voice mail received but no alert ring to the VM, double
> checked my setting under "sounds".
>
> Powered the phone off, then on again as in "reboot". Things went back
> to normal.
>
> Me thinks we have a software problem? :) 
>
> BTW, normal I leave my phone powered on 24/7. Looks like an
> occasional reboot is necessary. Since when did LG start using
> Windows? :) 
>
> - Sandy
>
Anonymous
February 15, 2005 6:36:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"No discernable pattern (yet)."

The only "discernable pattern" I have discovered is it's usually the calls I
really wanted that I miss :) !

J








"JP" <nospam@nowhere.invalid> wrote in message
news:NOmQd.221$DC6.96@newssvr14.news.prodigy.com...
> Me 3.
>
> LG VX3200
>
> Phone sometimes doesn't ring, voice mail received or missed call
> indication, but no alert ring. When I look at the screen, I see the text
> alert.
>
> I have had the phone for about 9 months and this has happened maybe 6
> times. No discernable pattern (yet).
>
>
>
> "Sandy A. Nicolaysen" <sandynic@verizon.net> wrote in message
> news:q1d211hsgcqp11k4051oovpt0mpla88gct@4ax.com...
>> On Mon, 14 Feb 2005 14:09:39 -0500, speedy <seedy@raex.com> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>
>>>Janie Collins wrote:
>>>
>>>> My old 4400 did this also (now I have the 6100), and there was trouble
>>>> ticket after trouble ticket for my local tower (problem never
>>>> solved)--many
>>>> times my phone will not ring, but as long as I'm left a voicemail, it
>>>> will
>>>> notify me immediately. The caller generally hears maybe 3 rings, so it
>>>> isn't like they get the VM immediately.
>>>
>>>Happens all the time. I'll be right next to my phone all day and no
>>>rings when all of a sudden I get a VM notification! I've also had a rash
>>>of people say they have tried to call and not gotten an answer.
>>>
>>>Oh well.
>>>
>>>-Pete
>> I recently experienced the same problem with a LG VX3200 phone. Phone
>> doesn't ring, voice mail received but no alert ring to the VM, double
>> checked my setting under "sounds".
>>
>> Powered the phone off, then on again as in "reboot". Things went back
>> to normal.
>>
>> Me thinks we have a software problem? :) 
>>
>> BTW, normal I leave my phone powered on 24/7. Looks like an
>> occasional reboot is necessary. Since when did LG start using
>> Windows? :) 
>>
>> - Sandy
>>
>
>
!