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Diablo 3 Beta Key Generator Free?

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April 9, 2012 9:43:46 AM

Recently, there are lots of free Diablo 3 Beta Key Generators appearing in the internet. It seems that Blizzard has not fully prepared for their preventive work. Maybe the cracked version is just around the corner?-From d3XXXX.com

April 9, 2012 10:14:44 AM

well done for trying to give devs yet another reason not to invest in the pc market, pc betas give us a chance to understand what a game is like, do you really want them to stop doing it, look at syndicate, no demo on PC because they were trying to polish it, if i'd have played the demo, i probably wouldn't have brought it, even cheap on origin.
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April 9, 2012 11:04:04 AM

Maybe.

But this is not a place for piracy.

You can discuss how piracy affects the PC gaming industry, your views on this news, etc...

But do not start asking for help on how to pirate games. You will be banned!!!


I think I have ward off the pirates so that this thread can remain open for discussion.
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April 9, 2012 11:19:51 AM

he's suggesting that there will be a cracked version around the corner, publicising it in fact, are d3XXXX.com blizzard, I doubt it.

So to the OP, tell us why this is a good thing, tell us why you've made us more aware of this, and those that were pir-curious have now been pushed a little further towards piracy. Why as your first post did you do this, or are you in fact representing, the pirates, and wanting it to be pirated, is your botnet not big enough? is your epeen to small to join? what possible benefit is there to posting this?
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April 9, 2012 1:19:11 PM

cracked version for the beta of the game? I could care less, if I wanted a beta, I would have applied for it with blizzard, I'm waiting for the game to release when it's all done and finished.
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April 9, 2012 3:27:26 PM

Piracy hurts PC gaming a lot. I can understand why people pirate - because hey, free ***. But it's extremely important to support developers by purchasing their games. Piracy is the #1 reason devs are focusing on making console games, and that in turn is why so many PC games are shoddy ports. If PC gamers as a collective purchased more games, I think we'd see a drastic shift in the quality of games coming out on PC.

I wrote a big opinion piece on it here http://wolframpc.blogspot.ca/2012/03/piracy-hurts-pc-ga...
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April 9, 2012 3:39:57 PM

I suspect there is a degree of laziness in it however as consoles are easier to code for, and piracy is very very easy to blame. Any talk of piracy and publicising of piracy will only strengthen the argument that they are missing trillions as a result of it.
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April 9, 2012 3:54:04 PM

Well even if you ignore the $ value of piracy, it's still hurting us badly. In the world there are more than a billion PCs, hundreds of millions have graphics cards. Even if you take only a small portion of PCs with graphics cards, say 100 million, and then halve that to account for the faster PCs that can play any game, you still have at least as many gaming PCs as consoles.

However, console games outsell PC 4:1 or 5:1, and on top of that PC piracy numbers are as as high as 5 times that of any given console.
http://torrentfreak.com/call-of-duty-black-ops-most-pir...
In 2010, Black Ops was pirated 930,000 times on Xbox and 4,270,000 times on PC - and that's only from BitTorrent stats.

You don't need to do any number crunching to see that piracy on PC is huge, and that it is almost ignorable on consoles. I think that right there is reason enough for developers to push PC games to the way-side unless it is an online game.
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April 9, 2012 4:23:59 PM

FYI don't support piracy in any way shape or form, I do disagree with a lot of the numbers that are used, the question is how many of the 4.27M (to use a number) users would have ever brought it?

The numbers are inflated to make a point, yet when a particular studio didn't want to port to a game to the PC (because of cost) when to my reckoning only 10,000 more copies would be needed to break even as 90% of the work is done, the sales numbers are massively deflated.

Its makes the pro-piracy groups able to poke holes in their arguments about loss of revenue, you see the same with hollywood and the music industry.
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April 9, 2012 4:36:28 PM

All I know is that the way battlefield 3 ended up with origin and battlelog is pretty annoying...
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April 9, 2012 4:38:23 PM

I'm liking battlelog, much better than having it in-game. and there are apparently dodgy versions out there so it hasn't helped. Origin i'm more annoyed with.
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April 9, 2012 4:46:21 PM

Well like I said, I agree that not every pirated copy is a lost sale. But it does make one wonder. I don't think the "I wouldn't have bought it anyway" argument is very good because you honestly can't say that without a lot of bias, as the option to get it free was always there.

Besides, even by ignoring the fact that PC games are pirated 4 times more than their console brethren, you still can't ignore that PC game sales are only 1/4 or 1/5th of that on console with at worst equal amount of gaming PCs as consoles (in reality, there's a lot more game-capable PCs than consoles).

And yeah they can crank out a PC port at relatively low cost - that happens with most games that I'm aware of. The problem is they don't expect a lot of sales - around 1/4th of their totals. So the PC version is often buggy or has no "standard features" like advanced graphics tweaking, or the ability to go beyond a 30fps cap. I got RAGE on release and besides the infamous texture issues, it didn't even have graphics tweaking. And that's an id Software game!

To me it isn't so much that people pirate games in the general sense, it's just that portion of gamers that pirate a game, and like it, and don't ever pay for it. If everyone who liked the game bought it, PC game sales should be at worst 3/4 that of consoles, at best it would easily surpass console sales.
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April 9, 2012 4:54:08 PM

i'm playing through syndicate, and the last patch has replaced the 'press return' 'press e' etc. to the corresponding xbox buttons including shoulders, so now I have no idea what they want me to press. had there been a demo i wouldn't have brought it, its linear, its consoled, its very poor in my opinion. I brought it on origin at 50% off, I'm not even sure it was worth that. Must do better.
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April 9, 2012 4:59:50 PM

Making a demo is easily the best thing publishers can do to put a dent in piracy numbers I think. At least at that point you can probably argue that any pirated copies are probably lost sales.
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April 9, 2012 5:05:39 PM

absolutely, by far the easiest thing to do, if its rubbish it'll drive sales down... don't be rubbish then!
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April 9, 2012 9:03:23 PM

wolfram23 said:
Well like I said, I agree that not every pirated copy is a lost sale. But it does make one wonder. I don't think the "I wouldn't have bought it anyway" argument is very good because you honestly can't say that without a lot of bias, as the option to get it free was always there.

Besides, even by ignoring the fact that PC games are pirated 4 times more than their console brethren, you still can't ignore that PC game sales are only 1/4 or 1/5th of that on console with at worst equal amount of gaming PCs as consoles (in reality, there's a lot more game-capable PCs than consoles).

And yeah they can crank out a PC port at relatively low cost - that happens with most games that I'm aware of. The problem is they don't expect a lot of sales - around 1/4th of their totals. So the PC version is often buggy or has no "standard features" like advanced graphics tweaking, or the ability to go beyond a 30fps cap. I got RAGE on release and besides the infamous texture issues, it didn't even have graphics tweaking. And that's an id Software game!

To me it isn't so much that people pirate games in the general sense, it's just that portion of gamers that pirate a game, and like it, and don't ever pay for it. If everyone who liked the game bought it, PC game sales should be at worst 3/4 that of consoles, at best it would easily surpass console sales.

I laugh every time I read a post claiming PC games get pirated X amount of time more than console. Where did you pull that number out of? Stop making things up. There's no way in hell any of those corporate bean counters can compile such statistic accurately. Bittorent statistic based on their user base, well guess what, conveniently in order to pirate a console game you don't need to download it, go borrow from a friend for a day, copy the disk and you're good to go. So, taking a number of torrent downloads as a definitive number for comparison for the media that doesn't require torrenting in the first place is shortsighted and foolish. But hey, that's what all those mass media articles are pushing for - ignorant masses that have no mind of their own and will believe anything that they are told.

At the end of the day piracy isn't going to go away no matter what they wish to try (hell take naval piracy that existed since first ship sailed the seas and guess what, it's still around today). SO if developers really had a brain, they would stop trying to combat something that cannot be defeated (because such is a nature of man) and focus on making better game content which in turn might encourage people to purchase their game.

I'm going to stop here, there's a thread in video game forum where we've explored this topic in length with many people presenting lots of valid points. If you fancy a read, pm me I'll give you a link to it. But please stop dropping silly numbers as support for your anti piracy claims. Piracy is bad, no-one would deny it, but the whole picture is far more complex than corporations would like you to think.

PS> oh yeah I've read your blog post before, I found many things wrong with it and lack of comment feature on your blog left me unable to relate that.
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April 9, 2012 9:08:18 PM

Who would want a cracked version of Diablo when all of the games replay features are hosted on blizzard servers, and Torchlight 2 looks better in every way regardless? Much ado about nothing here, imo.
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April 10, 2012 3:10:10 AM

wolfram23 said:
Making a demo is easily the best thing publishers can do to put a dent in piracy numbers I think. At least at that point you can probably argue that any pirated copies are probably lost sales.



I don't know about. It'll probably work for the casual person, but for people intent on getting games for free they will still download a pirated version.

Regardless of the demo's affect on piracy, I think publishers should release more demos because it is a way to attract the interest of potential buyers who might not be interested in trying out a different type of game than they are used to. For example, I probably would have bought GTA 3 a lot earlier if there had been a demo for that game. I didn't play it until around 2005 when by chance I visited a friend's place and noticed he had GTA 3 installed. I asked if I could give it a spin... and eventually I bought GTA VC, GTA SA and GTA 4. I would have never bothered to buy those games if I didn't play GTA 3 on my friend's PC.
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April 10, 2012 3:45:32 AM

AntiZig said:
I laugh every time I read a post claiming PC games get pirated X amount of time more than console. Where did you pull that number out of? Stop making things up.

http://torrentfreak.com/call-of-duty-black-ops-most-pir...

I also suggest you read through this http://www.tweakguides.com/Piracy_1.html

Also, how is it that some of the "Best rated games" get pirated so damn much? You'd think (considering you said this) that if a game is really good it won't get pirated much.

I mean Portal 2 is considered to be amazing, yet it's #5 on the most pirated of 2011 list. CoD MW3 and BF3 are considered the best FPS multiplayer games right now, certainly the most popular, and they occupy spots 2 and 3.
http://en.expreview.com/2012/01/04/torrentfreaks-list-o...

Sharing a game among friends is peanuts compared to the millions of pirated versions. I think when people look at stats like this they realize it is only a snapshot. Did you know you can also copy an ISO and just give it to a friend? OMIGOSH! It's almost just like what you said with consoles! Whoa! Except you only need to download a crack in about 3 minutes as opposed to giving your console and money to some random guy you met on Craig's List to mod it.

The fact is, there are more gaming PCs out there than consoles yet the sales aren't near as good. The fact that piracy is 4 times higher is just a bonus reason for developers to *** PC gamers over with shitty ports or none at all.

I also think it's pretty common knowledge that DRM does not stop piracy. In fact, I don't really think DRM is there to stop it, I think it's there to give publishers control, and I think it is a bad thing for the industry. That is pretty much irrelevant to the arguments at hand, besides being a BS excuse to pirate the game. Much like I said in my blog post, if you think shooting cops is going to make the police act a little nicer or more fair, you are sorely mistaken.
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April 10, 2012 3:51:51 AM

jaguarskx said:
I don't know about. It'll probably work for the casual person, but for people intent on getting games for free they will still download a pirated version.

Regardless of the demo's affect on piracy, I think publishers should release more demos because it is a way to attract the interest of potential buyers who might not be interested in trying out a different type of game than they are used to. For example, I probably would have bought GTA 3 a lot earlier if there had been a demo for that game. I didn't play it until around 2005 when by chance I visited a friend's place and noticed he had GTA 3 installed. I asked if I could give it a spin... and eventually I bought GTA VC, GTA SA and GTA 4. I would have never bothered to buy those games if I didn't play GTA 3 on my friend's PC.


Well my point is that - and it's just my hope, really - a lot of the pirated versions are just people who want to try the game, and if it's good, they buy it. I can admit to having done this before. That's why I picked up Metro 2033 - freaking amazing, but I was very very hesitant before trying it. Demos (legit) are also why I'm not bother with Kingdoms of Amalur or Darkness 2. I also was in the BF3 beta, and that sold the game for me (although I probably would have bought it anyway).

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I like to believe a lot of people are honest people and are only downloading a game because they don't know if they'll like it and if it's worth purchasing. The problem is that once you download it, it's very hard to then delete it and purchase the legitimate copy - I mean, you already have it. You know you should just do it, but... you have it.

Yes, of course there will still be people intent on pirating games. Of course they will. But I can't be convinced that every pirated copy is done by someone who never ever intended to buy the game or even thought about buying it. I mean if 1/4 of the people who pirate a game think it was worth buying but never did because they already had it... well, that's a million sales for many, many games. That is not a small amount, and that is something that worries publishers.

I don't think publishers are as stupid as a lot of people try to make them out to be. Like every pirated copy is a lost sale, or that any of these stats show the whole picture. That's naive. They know that a lot of less fortunate people are pirating games like crazy in asia, for example, and less so in america. The key is that a lot of people who can clearly afford to buy the game are not doing it.
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April 10, 2012 1:53:06 PM

wolfram23 said:

I also suggest you read through this http://www.tweakguides.com/Piracy_1.html
Cannot check right now, but I'll give it a read once I get home. Thanks for the link.

Quote:
Also, how is it that some of the "Best rated games" get pirated so damn much? You'd think (considering you said this) that if a game is really good it won't get pirated much.
Never said that, the better game will get pirated more, but it will also get more sales. The problem is you're thinking that piracy and sales are mutually exclusive things, they are not.



Quote:
Sharing a game among friends is peanuts compared to the millions of pirated versions. I think when people look at stats like this they realize it is only a snapshot. Did you know you can also copy an ISO and just give it to a friend? OMIGOSH! It's almost just like what you said with consoles! Whoa! Except you only need to download a crack in about 3 minutes as opposed to giving your console and money to some random guy you met on Craig's List to mod it.
FYI in countries outside of USofA consoles are already chipped and you don't need to give it to anybody. Rent/borrow the game for peanuts, copy, and piracy complete.

Quote:
The fact is, there are more gaming PCs out there than consoles yet the sales aren't near as good. The fact that piracy is 4 times higher is just a bonus reason for developers to *** PC gamers over with shitty ports or none at all.
That's a very questionable statement. The last time I've found a decent source that published statistics on this matter was in 2006, at that time PC was leading as you say, but by a very small margin. I don't know if situation has changed any, but unless I see evidence of otherwise I'm assuming that both markets are even.

Quote:
I also think it's pretty common knowledge that DRM does not stop piracy. In fact, I don't really think DRM is there to stop it, I think it's there to give publishers control, and I think it is a bad thing for the industry. That is pretty much irrelevant to the arguments at hand, besides being a BS excuse to pirate the game. Much like I said in my blog post, if you think shooting cops is going to make the police act a little nicer or more fair, you are sorely mistaken.
well, the control you refer to was pointed out in another topic - it's the fact that once you've installed the game and registered your serial key on PC you won't be able to borrow that game to a friend. Which basically makes you unable to resell your game after you're done with it. Publishers have a great itch about the resales on console games since they don't get a dime from them.

wolfram23 said:
Well my point is that - and it's just my hope, really - a lot of the pirated versions are just people who want to try the game, and if it's good, they buy it. I can admit to having done this before. That's why I picked up Metro 2033 - freaking amazing, but I was very very hesitant before trying it. Demos (legit) are also why I'm not bother with Kingdoms of Amalur or Darkness 2. I also was in the BF3 beta, and that sold the game for me (although I probably would have bought it anyway).

I guess what I'm trying to say is that I like to believe a lot of people are honest people and are only downloading a game because they don't know if they'll like it and if it's worth purchasing. The problem is that once you download it, it's very hard to then delete it and purchase the legitimate copy - I mean, you already have it. You know you should just do it, but... you have it.

Yes, of course there will still be people intent on pirating games. Of course they will. But I can't be convinced that every pirated copy is done by someone who never ever intended to buy the game or even thought about buying it. I mean if 1/4 of the people who pirate a game think it was worth buying but never did because they already had it... well, that's a million sales for many, many games. That is not a small amount, and that is something that worries publishers.

I don't think publishers are as stupid as a lot of people try to make them out to be. Like every pirated copy is a lost sale, or that any of these stats show the whole picture. That's naive. They know that a lot of less fortunate people are pirating games like crazy in asia, for example, and less so in america. The key is that a lot of people who can clearly afford to buy the game are not doing it.

Oh no, publishers aren't stupid, they however like to play dumb and feed you information they wish you to believe because general public is stupid and will buy whatever they are told (if publishers were stupid they wouldn't be in business). But saying a lot of people are this or that, yeah, I can also say there's over 6 billion people in the world, that's a lot, are any of them this or that? I think that doesn't make sense, let me say it another way, the publishers try to give you fake statistics that are supposed to demonstrate how bad it is to be in PC video game market, the point is that if things were all that bad, they would have left the market long ago. There will always be people who cannot afford the game, but wish to enjoy it, there will also be people who do not want to afford the game, meaning they could, but they'd rather not, they have their reasons for it.

Long story short, such is the reality of human society, the poor seek the luxury of the rich even when they cannot afford it. Until we achieve zero socio-economical separation between classes or better yet do away with classes completely, there will be piracy/stealing, for such is a nature of man.

The whole idea publishers are trying to achieve, reducing piracy, is ironic because if everybody who pirated bought their game to make the publisher richer, they would also be making themselves poorer, thus increasing the division between the rich and the poor, and then the next year the poor will be so poor that they won't be able to afford to spend the money on luxury of video game, and then they resort to piracy/stealing. Yes, there are cowards among the rich who would rather keep their wealth then spend it on luxury if they can get it for free, but all they are doing is shooting themselves in the leg. Which is case in point, if you can afford the game, buy it.
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April 10, 2012 2:37:36 PM

There is a lot of truth in your position, Antizig. Obviously, the poor will almost always desire the luxuries of the rich, and the less they have to pay for those luxuries the better (for them). That's the nature of man and there is no denying it.

However easy it is to render simple concepts to merely academic jousting points, the concept that theft is wrong is universal and simple. It's an issue of morality and legality and that is the nature of civilization.

I will say that the irony in publishers exploring ways to diminish piracy isn't lost on me. But the reason that the practice doesn't offend me, is the benefit of possible success no matter how ultimately accidental or clumsy. Quite frankly, I don't like the fact that digital theft is somehow less frowned upon that something as petty as shoplifting. I don't like the fact that young people today have no qualms with stealing luxury items. It's funny because vocal internet pirates who want to white knight their cause profess it as an act of rebellion against consumerism. In reality it's just bolstering the base principles of consumerism and instilling a murkier version of the same "keep up with the Jones's" in people who are occasionally too young to appreciate the irony of it. It just becomes a part of their personality.

Extending that point further (and I say this at the risk of it sounding incredibly novel and idealistic), the thought of making punishable theft less accessible to young kids is appealing to me. It may not come to fruition, but I'm ok with exploring means of making it less convenient, even at a modest inconvenience to myself. This comes from the fact that I quite frankly feel bad whenever some 16 year old (and their parents) eventually are brought up on charges or sued for losses. The fact is that they probably didn't fully appreciate the implied seriousness of their actions, and they're left receiving a huge wake up call for an offense that they weren't necessarily exploring surreptitiously to begin with. In their case often I get the impression that downloading licensed music for example, was as natural as doing anything else their friends do.

Now I realize that isn't always the case, but I don't think you would be ready to deny that it is never the case either. All things being equal, I'm personally in support of exploring means to make unfortunate scenarios like that, less common.



ps-don't take my post to mean that I'm voiding all of the logic in your post. Can't stress enough that as much as I stand by the aforementioned, I also believe in your principle reasoning as well.
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April 10, 2012 2:59:09 PM

Just to try and make myself clear - I don't think piracy can be stopped, and I don't think everyone who pirates is either able to or wants to purchase games. I'm quite sure a good chunk of pirated games are by people who just can't afford games or just don't give a *** that they are stealing.

But I also know for a fact that there's a lot of people that pirate games simply because it's convenient (and free).

Anyway, almost all of my arguments are just regurgitation's of the really good article I linked above, I highly suggest reading it when you have around 30 minutes to spare.
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April 10, 2012 3:54:50 PM

@casualcolors: yet another good point, and to tell you the truth in the last year that I've been on these boards I've come to look at DRM a lot more leniently (part of the credit goes to you, good sir). People here pointed out other things DRM accomplishes besides just being an annoyance. Partially because I've seen that some developers are moving towards better ways of managing game content over draconian tactic of game or no game depending on some conditions picked off the wall. On the other hand, I've seen much hate towards some DRM from some publisher, and I've bought that same game regardless because I wanted to play with my friends and honestly I've had zero problems with the game (Anno 2070 if anyone is wondering). My friends seem to be blaming the game quite often for this or that, but I have yet to encounter anything wrong with it, except for occasional glitches that I can easily explain.

I've come to accept DRM as a necessary evil, I don't mind it as much as I used to, because today I pay more attention to blatantly obvious unfinished game content, poor console ports and lack of creativity on the part of developers, but all that is a different topic.

@wolfram23: definitely will do once I can access it. And it seems that we agree after all, except that we use different argumentation to support our points.
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April 10, 2012 6:13:40 PM

Have to say I am bummed about this diablo 3 keygen news, even if it is for the beta version. Of course this loophole will be closed, and it will be harder to crack the release version, which is good.
I have a less lenient stance than casualcolors on DRM. Nobody gets access to my PC. I simply won't and don't purchase games that have such DRM. There are so many games that aren't flavor of the month that can be enjoyed. I also believe the piracy numbers stated by the big game production houses are inflated.
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April 10, 2012 6:22:27 PM

rpg_poser said:
I simply won't and don't purchase games that have such DRM.


Why? Or more accurately, which kind of DRM?
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April 10, 2012 6:28:23 PM

wolfram23 said:
Why? Or more accurately, which kind of DRM?


Like he just said, he's making a consumer's choice.
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April 10, 2012 6:31:35 PM

SecuROM+online authentication. I also don't like limited installs.
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April 10, 2012 6:55:11 PM

rpg_poser said:
SecuROM+online authentication. I also don't like limited installs.


You hate SecuROM and online authentications? :heink: 

Maybe you have some sort of legitimate reason to dislike those two methods, but maybe you should read this look at DRM:
http://www.tweakguides.com/Piracy_8.html

Consider this: nothing can prevent a thief from breaking into your house if they really want to. Those locks and security systems which homeowners install throughout their property can't stop someone from breaking a window to gain entry for example, or picking the locks, or in extreme cases, simply driving a stolen car through the front of the house. In fact it doesn't even require a 'hardcore' thief to overcome a property's protection. Through the simple technique of Lock Bumping, virtually any lock can be picked within 5 minutes and without a trace. In the spirit of DRM hysteria, here's a more sensationalist take on the issue: Nearly Every Lock You Have Is Now Worthless. Even if you upgrade your locks to try to overcome this vulnerability, consider the new SneaKey technique which allows potential thieves to create perfect duplicates of keys using only some software and a standard resolution digital photograph of the key - even from a picture taken at a distance of up to 200 feet away.

So really, all locks and keys do 99% of the time is present a constant inconvenience for legitimate users. If we lose them, we're locked out of our own houses or cars. Yet strangely enough, you won't find a groundswell of popular opinion stating firmly around the Internet that "door locks don't work!" and demanding that everyone remove them because of the inherent inconvenience that they impose. Why is that? Probably because everyone is the owner of physical property of some kind, and is willing to endure the constant inconvenience of various locks and keys in their daily lives in the hopes of protecting that property from potential theft, even if in reality it actually provides them with no real protection against most thieves. However because most people are not owners of intellectual property, they find it exceedingly easy to flippantly shout simplistic solutions across the Internet such as "Greedy companies must remove all protection and DRM, they don't work!". said:
Consider this: nothing can prevent a thief from breaking into your house if they really want to. Those locks and security systems which homeowners install throughout their property can't stop someone from breaking a window to gain entry for example, or picking the locks, or in extreme cases, simply driving a stolen car through the front of the house. In fact it doesn't even require a 'hardcore' thief to overcome a property's protection. Through the simple technique of Lock Bumping, virtually any lock can be picked within 5 minutes and without a trace. In the spirit of DRM hysteria, here's a more sensationalist take on the issue: Nearly Every Lock You Have Is Now Worthless. Even if you upgrade your locks to try to overcome this vulnerability, consider the new SneaKey technique which allows potential thieves to create perfect duplicates of keys using only some software and a standard resolution digital photograph of the key - even from a picture taken at a distance of up to 200 feet away.

So really, all locks and keys do 99% of the time is present a constant inconvenience for legitimate users. If we lose them, we're locked out of our own houses or cars. Yet strangely enough, you won't find a groundswell of popular opinion stating firmly around the Internet that "door locks don't work!" and demanding that everyone remove them because of the inherent inconvenience that they impose. Why is that? Probably because everyone is the owner of physical property of some kind, and is willing to endure the constant inconvenience of various locks and keys in their daily lives in the hopes of protecting that property from potential theft, even if in reality it actually provides them with no real protection against most thieves. However because most people are not owners of intellectual property, they find it exceedingly easy to flippantly shout simplistic solutions across the Internet such as "Greedy companies must remove all protection and DRM, they don't work!".


As yet another example of removing DRM not leading to any reduction in piracy, the game Demigod has been pirated so heavily in its initial release period that it has caused the game's servers to effectively go down. Out of the 120,000 connections made to the game's servers, over 100,000 were by confirmed pirates, leaving only around 18,000 legitimate purchasers. The game is released by Stardock, a relatively small company which has a lot of public support due to the mistaken perception that Brad Wardell, CEO of Stardock is anti-DRM (see the bottom of the next page for more details of Stardock's actual position). Demigod is widely considered to be a good game, it's available as a digital download priced at under $40, and has no intrusive DRM - yet not only has this not stopped the game from being rampantly pirated, preventing legitimate purchasers from playing the game, but has also resulted in poor reviews, potentially affecting future sales of the game. said:
As yet another example of removing DRM not leading to any reduction in piracy, the game Demigod has been pirated so heavily in its initial release period that it has caused the game's servers to effectively go down. Out of the 120,000 connections made to the game's servers, over 100,000 were by confirmed pirates, leaving only around 18,000 legitimate purchasers. The game is released by Stardock, a relatively small company which has a lot of public support due to the mistaken perception that Brad Wardell, CEO of Stardock is anti-DRM (see the bottom of the next page for more details of Stardock's actual position). Demigod is widely considered to be a good game, it's available as a digital download priced at under $40, and has no intrusive DRM - yet not only has this not stopped the game from being rampantly pirated, preventing legitimate purchasers from playing the game, but has also resulted in poor reviews, potentially affecting future sales of the game.
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