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Fax software missing and won't reinstall

Last response: in Windows XP
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Anonymous
June 3, 2004 12:40:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

I run Windows XP with SP1 and many post-SP1 patches.

I used to fax documents regularly from Microsoft Word
2002 SP1 by clicking "Print", selecting "Fax" as the
printer name and following through the Wizard. It
worked fine.

One day it wouldn't work. I uninstalled the fax
services using the Add/Remove Programs feature. I
rebooted, Then I attempted to reinstall it, by reapplying
the tick to "Fax" in the Add/Remove Programs dialog
box. This *seems* to work fine but in fact does not do
anything, and afterwards (even after a reboot) the "Fax"
box remains unticked. I have tried this several times
to no avail.

I looked in the Start Menu under
Accessories>Communications>Fax but the folder is empty
and does not contain a shortcut to the Fax Console.

I clicked Start Menu>Printers and Faxes, selected "Set up
faxing". A box then appeared, "Configuring Components"
with a progress bar, and after 10 or 15 seconds was
finished.

Under "Printer Tasks", the previous link, "Set up faxing"
was replaced by "Install a local fax printer". When I
click this nothing appears to happen, but after
refreshing the window, the link reverts to "Set up
faxing". There is still no "Fax printer" listed, only
my local physical printers.

I have searched the Microsoft Knowledge Base, this
newsgroup and the Web for this problem but can find no
reference to it .

I work as a P.C./ Windows troubleshooter but this one has
stumped me. Can anyone help please? :) 

Regards,
John Lynch
Anonymous
June 10, 2004 6:43:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

Try installing fax again by checking the check box in Add/Remove Windows
Components. After the installation completes (fails), see the file
FaxSetUp.log under %windir%. You might find some clue there as to why the
installation failed.
You could also get in touch with Russ Valentine (russval@mvps.org) the
Microsoft. MVP for outlook and send the log file through him to us at
Microsoft, so we may look into your problem further.

--
Vibha Rathi
Microsoft Printing, Imaging & Fax Team

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

Please do not send email directly to this alias. This alias is for newsgroup
purposes only.'

"John Lynch" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:17e3501c44981$250722d0$a001280a@phx.gbl...
> I run Windows XP with SP1 and many post-SP1 patches.
>
> I used to fax documents regularly from Microsoft Word
> 2002 SP1 by clicking "Print", selecting "Fax" as the
> printer name and following through the Wizard. It
> worked fine.
>
> One day it wouldn't work. I uninstalled the fax
> services using the Add/Remove Programs feature. I
> rebooted, Then I attempted to reinstall it, by reapplying
> the tick to "Fax" in the Add/Remove Programs dialog
> box. This *seems* to work fine but in fact does not do
> anything, and afterwards (even after a reboot) the "Fax"
> box remains unticked. I have tried this several times
> to no avail.
>
> I looked in the Start Menu under
> Accessories>Communications>Fax but the folder is empty
> and does not contain a shortcut to the Fax Console.
>
> I clicked Start Menu>Printers and Faxes, selected "Set up
> faxing". A box then appeared, "Configuring Components"
> with a progress bar, and after 10 or 15 seconds was
> finished.
>
> Under "Printer Tasks", the previous link, "Set up faxing"
> was replaced by "Install a local fax printer". When I
> click this nothing appears to happen, but after
> refreshing the window, the link reverts to "Set up
> faxing". There is still no "Fax printer" listed, only
> my local physical printers.
>
> I have searched the Microsoft Knowledge Base, this
> newsgroup and the Web for this problem but can find no
> reference to it .
>
> I work as a P.C./ Windows troubleshooter but this one has
> stumped me. Can anyone help please? :) 
>
> Regards,
> John Lynch
!