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Removing pink thermal compound

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
April 20, 2001 3:16:49 AM

DO I need to remove the old pink thermal compound on my CPU?
I am installing a new CPU fan/heatsink.
If yes, how do I do it. Very specific please.
Thanks.
April 20, 2001 3:52:15 AM

I dont know for personal experiance but from other posts ive read using a razer and some isopropal alcohal and get it all off if you dont then they HSF doesnt get good contact with the CPU.... or thats how i understand it

--- Not all idiots are stupid, some merely know <font color=red>no</font color=red><font color=orange>th</font color=orange><font color=blue>ing</font color=blue> ---
April 20, 2001 10:10:05 AM

As a rule, you will obtain the best thermal interface between your cpu and heatsink by removing any contaminants from them and mating the surfaces using a small amount of thermal compound. Many people swear by artic silver (II) for this purpose.


www.articsilver.com gives details and installation instructions.

You want the surface of your cpu die and the heatsink to be as flat and clean as possible. The thermal compound helps filling tiny gaps between the two and help heat transfer. The majority of pads seem poor performers.

The pad is often stubborn to remove, especially after you have run your system. A careful razor blade, on its edge, or thumb nail, aided by cotton buds, lint free cloth and rubbing alcohol/nail varnish remover/isopropyl alcohol work best.

Pete

-* This Space For Rent *-
email for application details
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a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
April 21, 2001 7:30:34 AM

It also comes off with very hot water and some dishwashing detergent!

Suicide is painless...........
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
April 22, 2001 6:00:19 PM

Mentioned was the pad. I see a small rectangular thing atop the CPU..I thought it part of the CPU because of AMD logo on it.
If this is the pad,should I pry this pad off??
Do I need to remove it? Or can I leave it there and apply the arctic silver to it?
If I need to remove it, can I reuse the pad?
Thanks
James371
A Man is as he thinkith
April 22, 2001 6:55:32 PM

Are you talking about the metal plate on top of the core of your CPU? DO NOT PRY THAT OFF!

- Tempus fugit donec vestrum relictus tripudium. Autem amor praeterea magis pretium.
April 22, 2001 9:18:32 PM

Ther is a small rectangular shape raised in the middle of the chip with AMD written on it. DO NOT TRY TO REMOVE THIS. This is the actual processor.

The 'pad' would normally be attached to the heatsink, and after use would 'melt' and be over the die (rectangle you can see) and heatsink. The die should be a a very smooth (polished) finish, as ideally should be the heatsink.

You cannot, and wouldn't really want to, reuse a thermal pad.

-* This Space For Rent *-
email for application details
April 23, 2001 7:31:26 PM

Quote:
I see a small rectangular thing atop the CPU..I thought it part of the CPU because of AMD logo on it.
If this is the pad,should I pry this pad off??


rofl...


Even a broken watch is right twice a day...
April 24, 2001 1:34:17 PM

Whew!
(sigh of relief that he asked before scraping....)
March 1, 2013 5:26:16 AM

Quote:
DO I need to remove the old pink thermal compound on my CPU?
I am installing a new CPU fan/heatsink.
If yes, how do I do it. Very specific please.
Thanks.


OK, I know exactly what you mean. Unlike most greases and compounds, the pink stuff is stiff and tarry and removing it is a 2 stage operation.

First, use the woody ends of a matchsticks to push/roll/scrape it off both surfaces. Matchsticks are good because they are not hard enough to actually damage aluminium/copper heatsinks, or the top of the chip. Sometimes I use my thumbnail ... but I can't really advise that because the pink stuff may be toxic and some people bite their nails :o 

Scraping it off will take you 5 to 10 minutes, be patient.

Second step is to remove the tacky residue which will still be smeared on both surfaces. I use one of the modern non-acetone nail polish removers, and a supply of 'Q-tips' or cotton buds (whatever you call them in your particular country). The nail polish remover I use is called 'Starlet', and I got it from K-mart for a few bucks. Just a minute or two of rubbing will remove the clammy film left by the pink pad compound.

Of course, finish off with a small amount of a good quality heatsink grease. I use Akasa 455 as a good compromise of quality and affordable price :hello: 
!