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How does my plan look?

Last response: in Video Games
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June 3, 2012 6:54:27 PM

Hello everyone,
I looking to buy a laptop. The laptop I am going to buy is the HP Probook 4530s. The reason I chose this laptop is because of the low price (300-ish), and the ability to run Mac OS X. But that is besides the fact.

What I really want to do is run GTA IV, Minecraft, Battlefield, and Skyrim. Needless to say, my Dell E6400 with 2.8GHz C2D is not making the cut.
The Probook has a Intel i3-2350M processor, 4GB RAM, and Intel HD3000 Integrated Graphics. I want to max GTA IV and the other games out out, highest settings possible. I know what you are thinking. Is this guy crazy?

Now I will tell you that I am going to buy an e-GPU (external GPU). Inside the e-GPU case, I was thinking about putting a ATI Radeon 6780. But I will not lie, I do not know a single thing about GPUs. I just saw on a forum that it was a good card. If there is a better card please tell me!

Is my i3 and 6780 going to be able to play at Maximum settings?

I have planned some upgrades later, such as 8GB Ram and either one of the following CPU: 2.00GH​z i7-2630QM or i7-2670QM. Also, an SSD.

More about : plan

a b D Laptop
June 3, 2012 7:24:54 PM

i've not seen an e-gpu setup in the wild yet, are you sure that laptop can use an e-gpu?

Having looked at the HP website I see no mention of it being able to use e-gpu's, I think that thunderbolt is needed for that.
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a b D Laptop
June 3, 2012 9:47:28 PM

well, its complex, there were somethings i read on a website that made me shudder at the complexity if you don't have switchable graphics built in, my concern is twofold.

1, your statement about not knowing much about gpu's, is that the same about all of your PC knowledge?
2, (compounded by 1), it seems like a bit of kludge and might need a lot of TLC to make it work, it may not just plug and play. If you like tinkering it might be a fun project, if you don't mind not being able to play as you have to fix something first then you are probably ok.

these comments were based on a 'home built' version of the vidock, but the changes at the PC end are probably the same.

I'm saying go into it eyes open, this should probably not be treated as a consumer product. Have you seen it reviewed anywhere?

Also hard gaming may thermally stress the cpu more than its thermal solution might like, be aware of temps.

Thunderbolt i'd be less concerned about as its external pci-e really, and plugs into the right parts of the mobo 'naturally'
June 3, 2012 11:00:13 PM

13thmonkey said:
well, its complex, there were somethings i read on a website that made me shudder at the complexity if you don't have switchable graphics built in, my concern is twofold.

1, your statement about not knowing much about gpu's, is that the same about all of your PC knowledge?
2, (compounded by 1), it seems like a bit of kludge and might need a lot of TLC to make it work, it may not just plug and play. If you like tinkering it might be a fun project, if you don't mind not being able to play as you have to fix something first then you are probably ok.

these comments were based on a 'home built' version of the vidock, but the changes at the PC end are probably the same.

I'm saying go into it eyes open, this should probably not be treated as a consumer product. Have you seen it reviewed anywhere?

Also hard gaming may thermally stress the cpu more than its thermal solution might like, be aware of temps.

Thunderbolt i'd be less concerned about as its external pci-e really, and plugs into the right parts of the mobo 'naturally'


Thank you for your opinion.

1. I believe I know a bit about PC's, but not about GPU's and Overclocking and Crossfire and the whole nine yards.

2. It is quite DIY, but I can assure you it is plug and play when you are finished. You plug the card into the ExpressCard slot, and it auto switches to the external GPU.

3. Honestly, I did not really think about the thermal compoound for the CPU!

But simply typing in egpu on google comes up with a forum thread with 1000+ pages, so it is a very well tested process
a b D Laptop
June 3, 2012 11:16:55 PM

jar50972 said:
Thank you for your opinion.

1. I believe I know a bit about PC's, but not about GPU's and Overclocking and Crossfire and the whole nine yards.

2. It is quite DIY, but I can assure you it is plug and play when you are finished. You plug the card into the ExpressCard slot, and it auto switches to the external GPU.

3. Honestly, I did not really think about the thermal compoound for the CPU!

But simply typing in egpu on google comes up with a forum thread with 1000+ pages, so it is a very well tested process


Sounds like your eyes are open, good luck to you.

6780 is ok, try for a 7XXX perhaps?
a b D Laptop
June 4, 2012 6:09:07 AM

this idea has been around for a long time but it never really worked. is basically an oximoron.
if you want mobility then get a lappy, if you want gaming then get a desktop...
it makes no sense to make a hybrid because of the power requirements of the gfx means its gonna have to be plunged in to a psu as there is no batteries out that could power it, so mobility is out.
this is why it never really took off... and why im saying save your money as you will pay a lot for not a lot of real world performance.
it may seem like a sound idea but in reality its now... the gfx card will break sooner rather than later as there not built to be moved even when in a case.
June 4, 2012 10:01:45 PM

Thank you for your suggestion, but I will stick to my eGPU idea. I have seen enough proof to know it works. I will only play games at my desk and the PSU/GPU wont move at all.

I guess my real question is this: will the i3 processor and the ATI 6570 be able to play the games I listed at Maximum settings? If there is a better graphics card, please let me know (GTX480??)
a b D Laptop
June 5, 2012 12:10:47 AM

the gtx 480 will monster that 6570. as the 6570 isnt what you call high end while the 480 still is...
!