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The Lagging Scrolls V: Stutterim

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June 9, 2012 1:49:21 PM

I'm moments away from throwing this game into the furnace. The amount of frustration this game gives me is off the limits. Seriously, here I am again. Re-installed it completely and started a new game with no mods installed, I enter Helgen Keep and I'm stuttering like hell, even looking around causes a lot of stuttering/micro-stuttering. Outside I'm getting 40-50 fps, obviously with no mods installed, inside I usually have 60+ fps. But why... why so much micro-stuttering, even when I open the world map it is miles away from being smooth.

The stuttering makes it unplayable, I don't know if I should call this lag or not. It doesn't make a difference if I use Game Booster or not, closing background processes... Jesus Christ... what do I gotta do just to play a game. Recently I've even installed an extra 2GB DDR2 memory into my motherboard, I don't even notice any difference. And yes, I'm running a 64-bit version of Windows Home Premium. I'll post my PC specs here too, I've played every CoD on max settings with everything enabled and still getting a maximum of 125 fps.

Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU - E8500 @ 3.16GHz (2 CPUs), ~3.2GHz
Memory: 6143MB RAM ddr2
Hard drive: 1TB sata
Video card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 460 overclocked - 1gb ddr5

I know it's not the best PC in the world to play Skyrim, but seriously, this pisses me off. And I wish I'd had ddr3 memory, but it doesn't fit into my motherboard, a quad-core processor would be nice too, but hey... I'm not the richest guy in the world.
June 10, 2012 1:16:08 AM

You are right you need a 4 core CPU and I don't think ddr3 memory is going to fix the problem. I have a few questions to ask. Is this problem just started or has it been doing this since you first got the game?

Does the problem start as soon as you start the game or does it start after you have been playing for about 4 to 5 min? Are you checking your temps while you are playing the game in other words it is displayed on the screen as you play?

What is your PSU brand and watts? What this looks like you are having a bottlenecking problem. I think your GPU is just a little to fast for your CPU.

The biggest card on nVidia's side is a GTX 550 Ti that you can use with a 2 core CPU. The GTX 460 is a far better card then the 550 ti. How long ago did you get the card? You can still answer my questions incase I am wrong.

On the AMD side with your CPU you might be able to run a 6850 but for sure a 6770.
Anyway get back to us and good luck on this. This link will show you that the 460 is a whole lot better than the 550.

GTX460 vs GTX550 Ti
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/542?vs=541
June 10, 2012 4:46:04 AM

Nice name for the thread had a good laugh. I would get a new build if i were you. There is no pint been a tightass. You should just sell off some old stuff on ebay or wherever and put in a bit of your own cash and get a mid end to high end build. When i got my new build in 2010 i did not spend a single cent of my own saving. I sold off some old laptops and some other junk and got the 1.25 grand togtehr like that. Good Luck.
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June 10, 2012 8:24:59 AM

Quote:
Is this problem just started or has it been doing this since you first got the game?

I bought Skyrim quite a while ago, ever since patch 1.5 came out it started to mess with things. The beta patch was even worse, and the newest patch, 1.6, didn't change a thing.

Quote:
Does the problem start as soon as you start the game or does it start after you have been playing for about 4 to 5 min? Are you checking your temps while you are playing the game in other words it is displayed on the screen as you play?

I'm using MSI Afterburner, I always make sure my card never gets a higher temperature than 75-80 degrees Celsius. when I'm playing for a couple of hours, it never manages to get higher than 70 degrees. The maximum temperature I've ever got is probably 73 degrees on a warm day. And yes, it usually happens after a few minutes.

Quote:
What is your PSU brand and watts?

Using a 850W power supply made by Antec, true-power Quattro.

Quote:
How long ago did you get the card?

I don't think it matters how long ago I bought it, but anyways, I bought it about 2-3 years ago.

And I've got an old Nvidia card lying around here, 8800GT, also got a metal illuminated keyboard that emits a calming blue light out of the keys. I'm sure I can get some money out of it.


June 10, 2012 11:39:12 AM

DM186 said:


The biggest card on nVidia's side is a GTX 550 Ti that you can use with a 2 core CPU. The GTX 460 is a far better card then the 550 ti. How long ago did you get the card? You can still answer my questions incase I am wrong.


I call bull on this, the way it is written this is simply untrue. Period. End of Story.

You can put as big a GPU as your PSU can take. Now you might find that there is limited benefit beyond this card as your CPU becomes the bottleneck, however this bottleneck shifts from game to game, some games only use a single core, in which case you have a very fast single core.

The problem with building so that there is no bottle neck is twofold.

Firstly the you are really building so that there are two bottlenecks that fight and which one wins depends on the circumstances.

Secondly when you then come to upgrade, you have to upgrade everything, costing you more overall.

For instance,
if you upgarde your current system with a £100 card, then when you upgrade your CPU you'll be limited to the performance of the £100 card. Hence having to upgrade it to a £200 card. Total spend on cards £300.
alternatively
if you upgrade your current system with a £200 card, then when you upgrade your CPU you'll be limited to the performance of a £200 card, total spend £200. Yes you'll not gain the full effect of the £200 card initially, but it will be better than the £100 card.

You are kind of leapfrogging in this case.

OP I know it doesn't answer your question, but there have been a few comments like this recently, and they will steer people in the wrong direction.
June 10, 2012 2:48:06 PM

Thanks for all the replies, really appreciate the help around here.

I think I've mostly fixed the issue by now. I've disabled both Anti Aliasing and Anisotropic Filtering in the Skyrim Launcher, then I went to my Nvidia control panel and opened the "manage control settings" tab, there I've selected Anisotropic Filtering to 16 and left all the Anti Aliasing stuff unchanged. I also opened up my SkyrimPrefs.ini file and changed iPresentInterval=1 to iPresentInterval=0. Doing this I disabled V-sync and the stuttering seems to have disappeared.
June 10, 2012 2:50:11 PM

By the way, I have been running Skyrim very successfully on a Geforce 8800GTS 320mb! You don't need to spend mega bucks. Cheers
June 11, 2012 1:21:01 AM

Running Skyrim on all high settings (no shadows I dont like them) on a 4 year old system...

Asus M2n32- SLI Deluxe Wifi Amd Anthlon 64 X2 6000+3.0mhz, 6GB Ocz Platinum ddr2 800,OCZ Mod Extreme 750watt PSU 2-1TB Western Digital Black HDD's
MSI NT8800gt OC Happuage 1600 HVR TV tuner, LG DVD/RW and Win 7 64bit Wrapped in a Themaltake Soprano VX
June 11, 2012 3:33:29 AM

13thmonkey said:
I call bull on this, the way it is written this is simply untrue. Period. End of Story.

You can put as big a GPU as your PSU can take. Now you might find that there is limited benefit beyond this card as your CPU becomes the bottleneck, however this bottleneck shifts from game to game, some games only use a single core, in which case you have a very fast single core.

The problem with building so that there is no bottle neck is twofold.

Firstly the you are really building so that there are two bottlenecks that fight and which one wins depends on the circumstances.

Secondly when you then come to upgrade, you have to upgrade everything, costing you more overall.

For instance,
if you upgarde your current system with a £100 card, then when you upgrade your CPU you'll be limited to the performance of the £100 card. Hence having to upgrade it to a £200 card. Total spend on cards £300.
alternatively
if you upgrade your current system with a £200 card, then when you upgrade your CPU you'll be limited to the performance of a £200 card, total spend £200. Yes you'll not gain the full effect of the £200 card initially, but it will be better than the £100 card.

You are kind of leapfrogging in this case.

OP I know it doesn't answer your question, but there have been a few comments like this recently, and they will steer people in the wrong direction.



^^^^
With all do respect and I am not trying to challange you and you are certainly intitled to your opinion.

The way you come across, the Core Duo will work with a 560 ti and it just might work with some games with out any bottlenecking. You maybe right on some games.

But I am refering too today's games that everybody is playing like Diablo 3, Skyrim, and BF3. We both know that it will bottleneck.

The games you will be able to play are not the top games of today. Lets make one more example lets say I want to play BF3 on my core duo with a 6870. Will I bottleneck?

I am speaking from my personal experience with these cards and CPU's. That is why we are here to help people from our own personal experiences and knowledge.

I am sorry that you feel that way about people misleading the OP's because it isn't my intention to do that and besides I never challange anybodys comments weather they are right or wrong.

If they are wrong I just show the OP the difference. Lets work together on here to help the people who need the help and not challange the little stuff like in a microscope when in general is the over all picture.

I have a lot of respect for you and your knowledge and I in the past have learned from you in areas that I was weak in.
June 11, 2012 12:03:33 PM

You can use up to a 560ti with that setup (any card with PCIe 2.0 or lower) The gain will outweigh any bottleneck, Although if your 460 isn't going dysfunctional it should be plenty good enough, Also you might try AMD's Fusion software it lets you set profiles with one click shutting down all unessential background processes.

Get it here > http://sites.amd.com/us/game/downloads/fusion-for-deskt...

:o 
June 11, 2012 5:36:28 PM

I'm fairly sure it's AA setting that kills the game for people.
June 11, 2012 6:53:45 PM

systex said:
Thanks for all the replies, really appreciate the help around here.

I think I've mostly fixed the issue by now. I've disabled both Anti Aliasing and Anisotropic Filtering in the Skyrim Launcher, then I went to my Nvidia control panel and opened the "manage control settings" tab, there I've selected Anisotropic Filtering to 16 and left all the Anti Aliasing stuff unchanged. I also opened up my SkyrimPrefs.ini file and changed iPresentInterval=1 to iPresentInterval=0. Doing this I disabled V-sync and the stuttering seems to have disappeared.



also try setting anistropic filtering to 8 rather than 16, you will get a bit more performance and not notice much has changed visually
June 11, 2012 7:05:31 PM

DM186 said:
^^^^

The way you come across, the Core Duo will work with a 560 ti and it just might work with some games with out any bottlenecking. You maybe right on some games.

I have a lot of respect for you and your knowledge and I in the past have learned from you in areas that I was weak in.


I've cut a lot out of this as it'll get in the way of the OP, thanks for your considered response.

I'm actually going to raise this topic with staff, as I think that a proper view of how to structure an upgrade, do you work to the bottlenecks or do you go a little more extreme whats the difference in cost and playability over a 4-5 year period, when most people would upgrade GPU and CPU once perhaps. Starting with a core duo system and an ok GPU, and a finite amount of money, every 18-24 months what do you do? I'll have to work on structuring the question, what do you think? is this an article that could do with being read? I don't have enough bits around to model what would happen, so it would have to be written by toms. do you mind if I quote this thread, its not the only one, but I can at least find it.
June 11, 2012 9:53:33 PM

Download the SMAA injector here if you want Anti-Aliasing with barely any frame-rate loss : http://skyrim.nexusmods.com/mods/16233

That injector allows me to get alot fewer jaggies with little to no performance loss.

I've got an E6700 Core 2 Duo @ 3.3GHz (3.2 stock. Overclocked slightly for a nice, small boost), ddr2 675 MHz ram and an AMD Radeon HD 6670 DDR3.

Also, AF hardly affects frame-rates. Just be sure to use the performance version in your driver's control panel and jack it up to 16. Performance loss is what, 2, maybe 3 frames at the most demanding scenes?

You can also try getting D3D9.dll Gen here and putting it into your Skyrim root folder to see if you notice any performance gains: http://newvegas.nexusmods.com/mods/34970

I used it, noticed significantly less stuttering (I still have it, but that's cause my Hard Drive is showing it's limitations as to being a rotating metallic platter)
June 12, 2012 12:41:29 AM

13thmonkey said:
I've cut a lot out of this as it'll get in the way of the OP, thanks for your considered response.

I'm actually going to raise this topic with staff, as I think that a proper view of how to structure an upgrade, do you work to the bottlenecks or do you go a little more extreme whats the difference in cost and playability over a 4-5 year period, when most people would upgrade GPU and CPU once perhaps. Starting with a core duo system and an ok GPU, and a finite amount of money, every 18-24 months what do you do? I'll have to work on structuring the question, what do you think? is this an article that could do with being read? I don't have enough bits around to model what would happen, so it would have to be written by toms. do you mind if I quote this thread, its not the only one, but I can at least find it.


I totally agree with you on this one. There is a fine line between what will and what will not work and if you can come up with a sticky or a article that will shed more light on this issue.

It would be a very good article to read. The reason I say this is because when upgrading do you start with the CPU or the GPU? Like you said "do you work to the bottlenecks or do ou go a little extreme".

I think that the guess work should be taken out of it and maybe a guide to be followed to prevent such issues from happing. It looks like you are going to be doing a lot of work to bring this problem to lite.

You have my permission to use this to help bring this problem to lite. And If there is anything I can do to help feel free to ask.

@ OP sorry for jacking some of your thread and I hope you can see what we are talking about to take out the guess work of what you can do or can not do. I do apologize for this. Good luck to you on your quest.
June 22, 2012 2:23:36 PM

Bump. I'm thinking about buying a EVGA GTX580 1,5GB, found it on a secondhand website, so its obviously been used, it hasn't been used much though. It's in good condition and the owner still has the original box, cables and books. It's quite cheap really, only €180. I dunno if it's worth sending a link, everything is in Dutch.
But if I'm going to buy it, I'm sure it'll give me a boost. I'm still doubting a little whether I'm going to buy a quad-core or a new video-card.
June 22, 2012 4:57:53 PM

do it, it'll remove the gpu as a bottleneck
June 22, 2012 5:53:49 PM

Yeah, I should think so. I can always sell my GTX460 for some coin too. Thanks a lot for your help here mate.
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