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Hey guys, i partioned my H.D.D and the other one is nearly full, now i want to colapse that partition so its one big hardrive how do i do that ?
heres my H.D.D=
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Gparted is a great free tool to manage partitions with, but Windows 7 actually has built-in partitioning capability.
  2. Best answer
    If I were you, I'd move all of my private files from C: to D:,
    and then get in the habits of doing routine drive images of C:
    and saving all private data files to D: from now on.

    When C: is small and private date files are stored elsewhere,
    restoring C: is straightforward, and it does not result in
    deleting all private files created after the latest drive image
    was written.

    So, I offer this recommendation:

    (1) move private data files to D:

    (2) shrink C: to 30-50 GB, using a good freeware program
    like Partition Wizard, and then enlarge D: by the same amount
    you have shrunk C:

    http://www.partitionwizard.com/

    (3) install a second HDD and partition it the same as C: and D:
    e.g. H: and I:

    (4) set your drive image program to write drive images to H:
    to prevent armature thrashing during that task;

    (5) after a drive image is written to H:,
    copy it to D: for redundancy, also to prevent
    armature thrashing;

    (6) after that drive image is copied to D:,
    then copy it from D: to I:, also to prevent
    armature thrashing;

    (7) use a serial numbering sequence e.g.
    images.001, images.002, images.003 etc
    to serialize each drive image folder;

    (8) when you get this sequence going well,
    write a batch file that does steps (5), (6) and (7)
    semi-automatically;

    (9) periodically (you decide how often) backup all
    private date files from D: to I:


    The advantage of this sequence is that either HDD can fail,
    and you will have a working drive image of C: on the
    one that did not fail.

    The probability that both HDDs fail simultaneously
    is extremely small, assuming that your input power is
    reliable e.g. with a quality UPS.

    The other advantage of this approach is that C: is "short-stroked"
    resulting in much better HDD performance with frequently used OS files.
    To see the benefits of short-stroking graphically, study this:

    http://www.supremelaw.org/systems/io.tests/platter.transfer.crossover.graphs.2.png

    Likewise, you can get fancy, if you want, and move
    your Windows paging file to H:, and make it perfectly contiguous
    using the "CONTIG" freeware. Likewise, you can move
    your browser caches to H: as well, to achieve greater
    parallelism with concurrent I/O to C: and H: .


    I hope this helps.


    MRFS
  3. Best answer selected by DoganMods.
  4. MRFS said:
    If I were you, I'd move all of my private files from C: to D:,
    and then get in the habits of doing routine drive images of C:
    and saving all private data files to D: from now on.

    When C: is small and private date files are stored elsewhere,
    restoring C: is straightforward, and it does not result in
    deleting all private files created after the latest drive image
    was written.

    So, I offer this recommendation:

    (1) move private data files to D:

    (2) shrink C: to 30-50 GB, using a good freeware program
    like Partition Wizard, and then enlarge D: by the same amount
    you have shrunk C:

    http://www.partitionwizard.com/

    (3) install a second HDD and partition it the same as C: and D:
    e.g. H: and I:

    thankyou :)
    (4) set your drive image program to write drive images to H:
    to prevent armature thrashing during that task;

    (5) after a drive image is written to H:,
    copy it to D: for redundancy, also to prevent
    armature thrashing;

    (6) after that drive image is copied to D:,
    then copy it from D: to I:, also to prevent
    armature thrashing;

    (7) use a serial numbering sequence e.g.
    images.001, images.002, images.003 etc
    to serialize each drive image folder;

    (8) when you get this sequence going well,
    write a batch file that does steps (5), (6) and (7)
    semi-automatically;

    (9) periodically (you decide how often) backup all
    private date files from D: to I:


    The advantage of this sequence is that either HDD can fail,
    and you will have a working drive image of C: on the
    one that did not fail.

    The probability that both HDDs fail simultaneously
    is extremely small, assuming that your input power is
    reliable e.g. with a quality UPS.

    The other advantage of this approach is that C: is "short-stroked"
    resulting in much better HDD performance with frequently used OS files.
    To see the benefits of short-stroking graphically, study this:

    http://www.supremelaw.org/systems/io.tests/platter.transfer.crossover.graphs.2.png

    Likewise, you can get fancy, if you want, and move
    your Windows paging file to H:, and make it perfectly contiguous
    using the "CONTIG" freeware. Likewise, you can move
    your browser caches to H: as well, to achieve greater
    parallelism with concurrent I/O to C: and H: .


    I hope this helps.


    MRFS
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