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Which material?

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September 3, 2001 4:48:31 AM

Hi,
I am thinking about trying an experiment to make a water cooling system, except a very powerful one. Which material should I use for the pipes so that maximum heat is transfered from the heatsink to the water?
By the way, please don't say gold since I already know it's the best, but don't want to spend thousands on pipes.

When I rule the world, Apple will only mean the fruit.

More about : material

Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 3, 2001 5:02:43 AM

Copper


~Burnt my cookie overclocking~
a b K Overclocking
September 3, 2001 6:22:36 AM

Copper conducts heat better than gold, I believe. And I know for a fact it conducts electricity better. Gold is used for electrical connections because it resist corrosion, because copper oxide is not as good a conductor.

Back to you Tom...
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September 3, 2001 8:32:17 AM

"Which material should I use for the pipes so that maximum heat is transfered from the heatsink to the water?"

For transfering heat from the heatsink to the water you
don't use pipe, you use waterblock.

Regarding best heat transfering materials, the best is
silver, then copper, then aluminum. For more details,
check any physics textbook for the first year of
college. There are much more details there, easy to
understand.
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 3, 2001 9:17:07 AM

How much better is silver anyway?




~Burnt my cookie overclocking~
Anonymous
a b K Overclocking
September 3, 2001 9:52:33 AM

In hydraulics which I’m better at than puters btw, pipe is always better to use than hose, only use hose where you have to use it then only in sweeping bends.

Now as far as I know you can use that clear plastic hose as the heat and pressure rating required isn’t very high.
I would use malleable copper tubing with pipefittings directly into the water block, this can be done with a lot of care in aligning the CPU to the water block by hand bending the pipe. (Install insulation if required)
Alternatively pipe to the general area then plumb off to plastic hose for flexibility. But the above isn’t always practical and would make a small difference in the end result on this kind of application.

IMHO its not worth using anything other than plastic hose for water cooling as the benifits of using copper tube are marginal, water cooling is very inefficient compared to refrigeration.

Get the PDF file at <A HREF="http://www.vapochill.com/var/manual/downloads/5_(A4,_web).pdf" target="_new">Vapochill</A> page 21~38 for some ideas on hard plumbing!



~Burnt my cookie overclocking~
<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by scotty3303 on 09/03/01 08:12 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
September 3, 2001 5:33:29 PM

Just an aside...but when I worked at Pratt&Whitney we used gold plate for heat transfer on the Blackbird jet engines.

I want to die like my Grandfather...in my sleep...not screaming in terror like his passengers.
a b K Overclocking
September 3, 2001 10:29:41 PM

It makes a great interface material because it resist corrosion better.

Back to you Tom...
September 4, 2001 2:01:26 AM

Ok copper absorbs heat better - but doesn't aluminum dissipate heat the best? .. and so wouldn't you want that after the CPU water block in the system at least?

My theory for a good water cooler setup is, you use the best metal you can to absorb the heat at the CPU (like copper - or gold if you are rich)- but as soon as the heat is away from the CPU (absorbed in to the copper water block or whatever) you'd want to use aluminum to get the heat away from the coolant.. right?

So some aluminum tubing leading out of the water block with some of the fuzzy heatsink attached to it (like what you see in AC unit's coils) leading into an aluminum radiator would seem ideal imo...

<b> <font color=blue> Next time that card won't fit , use Tom's hammer! </font color=blue> </b>
September 4, 2001 3:40:17 AM

" Ok copper absorbs heat better - but doesn't aluminum dissipate heat the best? .. and so wouldn't you want that after the CPU water block in the system at least? "

You are mixing apples and oranges. There are two different
things there.
First is heat transfer through the material.
Second is heat transfer from one material to another.

First, silver is the best, then copper, then aluminum.
Second depends on both materials, as well as other
factors.

Regarding heat transfer btw CPU and HSF, the problem
is contact. Even with polished sirfaces, micriscopic
air pockets are present, So heat gets transfered
from CPU to air to HSF. Air is terrible heat conductor,
acting as heat insulation. Major reason is (almost
nonexistant) density. So thermal paste is a must.

Also, radiator is as important as waterblock. Without
good one, water temp will be wery high.
!