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Playing with a friend

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April 19, 2005 7:03:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a lot and
try to learn, but I don't post very much. However, I'd love some input on
my situation: I bought a second copy of EQ2 (and a second account) for my
7-year-old son, because he was playing mine all the time, and I knew it
would be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was correct about
it being fun as heck, but I'm looking for ways to improve our experience
(not as in "XP" in the game, just our level of fun) as a duo. And don't
worry about him being only seven years old. He does really well, although
he's just now learning to type fast enough to chat effectively. He's in
first grade, but he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow directions
and do his job well in groups. He currently plays 5 different characters,
but his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players never
seem to suspect that he's young, and he seems to always be welcome in the
groups he's in.

What are some things we can do to "branch out" together? Would you
recommned us joining the same guild, perhaps? Or how could we choose
tradeskills that will be mutually-beneficial over the long term? If you had
a friend with whom you could devise "strategies" to help each other, how
would you do it? Right now we mostly just group up and fight stuff. It's
fun, but we're now looking for "more."

Input appreciated.

jake

More about : playing friend

Anonymous
April 19, 2005 7:03:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

Jake wrote:
> I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a lot and
> try to learn, but I don't post very much. However, I'd love some input on
> my situation: I bought a second copy of EQ2 (and a second account) for my
> 7-year-old son, because he was playing mine all the time, and I knew it
> would be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was correct about
> it being fun as heck, but I'm looking for ways to improve our experience
> (not as in "XP" in the game, just our level of fun) as a duo. And don't
> worry about him being only seven years old. He does really well, although
> he's just now learning to type fast enough to chat effectively. He's in
> first grade, but he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow directions
> and do his job well in groups. He currently plays 5 different characters,
> but his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players never
> seem to suspect that he's young, and he seems to always be welcome in the
> groups he's in.
>
> What are some things we can do to "branch out" together? Would you
> recommned us joining the same guild, perhaps? Or how could we choose
> tradeskills that will be mutually-beneficial over the long term? If you had
> a friend with whom you could devise "strategies" to help each other, how
> would you do it? Right now we mostly just group up and fight stuff. It's
> fun, but we're now looking for "more."
>
> Input appreciated.
>
> jake
>
>

First off, let me just say that I can only HOPE that my son (15 months
now) is as skilled as yours when he gets to that age. Congratulations.

As for your questions...

I would suspect that both of these options are good choices. A good
guild, large or small, and I usually prefer the smaller family type
guilds, are a great addition to the gaming experience. I have a group
of friends and family who have played together for many years in many
games and we also try to compliment each other in our choices of trade
skills. Between the bunch of us we usually manage to get at least one
of each trade skill. It is fun being able to supply each other and
knowing that you have a source of equipment or supplies should you
really need it.

Just my two coppers but I think you and he will enjoy everything these
"add-ons" will give you.


Fingon, Paladin of Resolute on Lucan D'Lere
Anonymous
April 19, 2005 7:03:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

Jake wrote:
> I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a
lot and
> try to learn, but I don't post very much. However, I'd love some
input on
> my situation: I bought a second copy of EQ2 (and a second account)
for my
> 7-year-old son, because he was playing mine all the time, and I knew
it
> would be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was
correct about
> it being fun as heck, but I'm looking for ways to improve our
experience
> (not as in "XP" in the game, just our level of fun) as a duo. And
don't
> worry about him being only seven years old. He does really well,
although
> he's just now learning to type fast enough to chat effectively. He's
in
> first grade, but he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow
directions
> and do his job well in groups. He currently plays 5 different
characters,
> but his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players
never
> seem to suspect that he's young, and he seems to always be welcome in
the
> groups he's in.
>
> What are some things we can do to "branch out" together? Would you
> recommned us joining the same guild, perhaps? Or how could we choose
> tradeskills that will be mutually-beneficial over the long term? If
you had
> a friend with whom you could devise "strategies" to help each other,
how
> would you do it? Right now we mostly just group up and fight stuff.
It's
> fun, but we're now looking for "more."
>
> Input appreciated.
>
> jake



I might suggest looking for a guild that uses Team speak, something
that uses voice over internet ( Like Ventrilo) this would cut down on
the ammount of typing he has to do(unless you want him to learn to type
better)

Teamspeak often speeds up the gameplay, and in situations where you
need to give out complex directions in a hurry, it makes it much
easier.

You can still type most of your chat if you want to, but I know it's
sometimes hard to type in "HEY, I'm Getting Hit here!!" while you are
running for your life.
Related resources
Anonymous
April 19, 2005 7:03:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

Jake wrote:
> I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a
> lot and
> try to learn, but I don't post very much. However, I'd love some
> input on
> my situation: I bought a second copy of EQ2 (and a second account)
> for my
> 7-year-old son, because he was playing mine all the time, and I knew
> it
> would be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was
> correct about
> it being fun as heck, but I'm looking for ways to improve our
> experience
> (not as in "XP" in the game, just our level of fun) as a duo. And
> don't
> worry about him being only seven years old. He does really well,
> although
> he's just now learning to type fast enough to chat effectively. He's
> in
> first grade, but he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow
> directions
> and do his job well in groups. He currently plays 5 different
> characters,
> but his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players
> never
> seem to suspect that he's young, and he seems to always be welcome in
> the
> groups he's in.
>
> What are some things we can do to "branch out" together? Would you
> recommned us joining the same guild, perhaps? Or how could we
> choose
> tradeskills that will be mutually-beneficial over the long term? If
> you had
> a friend with whom you could devise "strategies" to help each other,
> how
> would you do it? Right now we mostly just group up and fight stuff.
> It's
> fun, but we're now looking for "more."
>
> Input appreciated.
>
> jake


I would both join the same guild. I have been in several guilds where
parents and childern play together. If you dont mind me asking, what
server are you two playing on?

As for tradekskills, my fiancee and I play together all the time. When
it came time to choose tradeskills, she became a scribe and I chose to
be a craftsman. I can make the paper and the quills that she uses to
make the spells. It has worked out rather nicely, and we both make a
nice profit from it as well.

__________________________________________________________
Submitted by: Vidden
This message was submitted through the Erollisi Marr Forum
Anonymous
April 19, 2005 7:03:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

"Keck" <rkeck@cherokee.org> wrote in message
news:1113928304.463073.260180@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Jake wrote:
>> I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a
> lot and
>> try to learn, but I don't post very much. However, I'd love some
> input on
>> my situation: I bought a second copy of EQ2 (and a second account)
> for my
>> 7-year-old son, because he was playing mine all the time, and I knew
> it
>> would be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was
> correct about
>> it being fun as heck, but I'm looking for ways to improve our
> experience
>> (not as in "XP" in the game, just our level of fun) as a duo. And
> don't
>> worry about him being only seven years old. He does really well,
> although
>> he's just now learning to type fast enough to chat effectively. He's
> in
>> first grade, but he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow
> directions
>> and do his job well in groups. He currently plays 5 different
> characters,
>> but his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players
> never
>> seem to suspect that he's young, and he seems to always be welcome in
> the
>> groups he's in.
>>
> > [snip]
>
>
> I might suggest looking for a guild that uses Team speak, something
> that uses voice over internet ( Like Ventrilo) this would cut down on
> the ammount of typing he has to do(unless you want him to learn to type
> better)
>
> Teamspeak often speeds up the gameplay, and in situations where you
> need to give out complex directions in a hurry, it makes it much
> easier.
>
> You can still type most of your chat if you want to, but I know it's
> sometimes hard to type in "HEY, I'm Getting Hit here!!" while you are
> running for your life.
>

Seems like this would make everyone in his group constantly aware of his
age, whereas typing doesn't necessarily.... I'm not saying that he should
hide his age, but having it "out there" all the time may be a hindrance.
Just a thought.



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Anonymous
April 20, 2005 12:03:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

>>
>
> Seems like this would make everyone in his group constantly aware of
> his age, whereas typing doesn't necessarily.... I'm not saying that
> he should hide his age, but having it "out there" all the time may be
> a hindrance. Just a thought.
>
>
>
> -

Hiding the boy's age from guildies is a very bad thing. I have no problems
with playing with the 14 yr old in my guild, he's a mature young man and
has been no trouble. OTOH, some 15 yr olds and older people I know are
very immature and I'd rather throw them off a cliff than help them in EQ.

Knowing up front that you are playing with a child will keep a handle on
some the trash talking I hear sometimes. Not that every kid will shrivel
up and die from hearing a few cuss words but seriously, no parent wants
thier kid to be on the recieving end of some the things I've heard people
say, and not just in Teamspeak, OOC is downright filthy sometimes.

To the OP: It's great that you want to share something with your 7 yr old.
Personally, I think 7 is a might young but if he has a 6th grader's
mentality, then the stimulation might actually be good for him. I wouldn't
allow him to play alone under any circumstances. Even if it's just for a
few hours while you are at work. There are perverts who target kids in EQ,
gotta keep him safe from them. Teach him that sometimes you have bad days
ingame. I know I've had crying fits from those bad days, G-d only knows
how I would have reacted at a much younger age. Don't let EQ become more
important than anything else in his life.
Anonymous
April 20, 2005 4:22:43 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

"Jake" <jake@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:I499e.7226$0d6.6128@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a lot
and
> try to learn, but I don't post very much. However, I'd love some input on
> my situation: I bought a second copy of EQ2 (and a second account) for my
> 7-year-old son, because he was playing mine all the time, and I knew it
> would be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was correct
about
> it being fun as heck, but I'm looking for ways to improve our experience
> (not as in "XP" in the game, just our level of fun) as a duo. And don't
> worry about him being only seven years old. He does really well, although
> he's just now learning to type fast enough to chat effectively. He's in
> first grade, but he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow
directions
> and do his job well in groups. He currently plays 5 different characters,
> but his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players
never
> seem to suspect that he's young, and he seems to always be welcome in the
> groups he's in.
>
> What are some things we can do to "branch out" together? Would you
> recommned us joining the same guild, perhaps? Or how could we choose
> tradeskills that will be mutually-beneficial over the long term? If you
had
> a friend with whom you could devise "strategies" to help each other, how
> would you do it? Right now we mostly just group up and fight stuff. It's
> fun, but we're now looking for "more."
>
> Input appreciated.
>
> jake
Joining a guild would be great. I think it is really important to be honest
with a guild about your son's age.
There are plenty around but you need to make sure that you join one that is
family orientated.

As someone else mentioned Teamspeak is a great tool for playing, I wish we
had used it in EQ1 :) 

With the changes that have been made to tradeskills much of the
interdependency has been reduced so it really depends on what you want from
tradeskilling.
For example I have a scribe that needs quills, paper, inks and tempers.
Whilst these are not standard combines for a scribe, I can make them at a
slightly higher fuel cost and not have to go looking for anyone else to make
them for me.
It has made the process of tradeskilling alot more fun for me.

Good luck with your choices!


--
eq2.najena.Simonette
eq2.najena.Floriana
eq.bristlebane.Simonette
eq.bristlebane.Agapanthus
Anonymous
May 2, 2005 5:55:47 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.everquest (More info?)

"Jake" <jake@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de news:
I499e.7226$0d6.6128@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
>I received EQ2 for Christmas, so, yes, I'm a newbie. I hang here a lot and
> try to learn, bvt I don't post very mvch. However, I'd love some inpvt on
> my sitvation: I bovght a second copy of EQ2 (and a second accovnt) for my
> 7-year-old son, becavse he was playing mine all the time, and I knew it
> wovld be a blast for him and me to play together. Well, I was correct
> abovt
> it being fvn as heck, bvt I'm looking for ways to improve ovr experience
> (not as in "XP" in the game, jvst ovr level of fvn) as a dvo. And don't
> worry abovt him being only seven years old. He does really well, althovgh
> he's jvst now learning to type fast enovgh to chat effectively. He's in
> first grade, bvt he reads on a 6th grade level, so he can follow
> directions
> and do his job well in grovps. He cvrrently plays 5 different characters,
> bvt his main one when we play is his L16 Sorcerer. The other players
> never
> seem to svspect that he's yovng, and he seems to always be welcome in the
> grovps he's in.
>
> What are some things we can do to "branch ovt" together? Wovld yov
> recommned vs joining the same gvild, perhaps? Or how covld we choose
> tradeskills that will be mvtvally-beneficial over the long term? If yov
> had
> a friend with whom yov covld devise "strategies" to help each other, how
> wovld yov do it? Right now we mostly jvst grovp vp and fight stvff. It's
> fvn, bvt we're now looking for "more."
>
> Inpvt appreciated.
>
> jake

Hiya, Jake & son!

I jvst read yovr post...

Way back in September 1999, I started playing EQ with my son when he was 8
and a half. We still do and we've come a long way together.

We started ovt as a warrior-cleric dvo to give him a feel for the game (not
to belittle the complexity of playing a warrior, bvt it is qvite
straightforward and he covld handle it). Then we tried a few other
combinations : from SK-shaman, to monk-drvid and a covple more 'creative'
combinations with me always playing the back-vp role and Max playing the
melée or 'offence' character.

Things went well and he learned fast (and lvckily so did I !!!) and we
started grovping with others. Sometimes we told others he was a yovngster,
sometimes we didn't. The thing is, when he played well and didn't make any
mistakes, people qvickly forgot his age and grovp banter often got a tad
more 'grown-vp' than I'd wished...

However, he took it all in stride and sometimes asked team mates to watch
their langvage. Usvally, all graciovsly complied and even apologized.

Then we both joined a low-level gvild and didn't qvite like the atmosphere
thovgh it had more to do with inner power strvggles than anything else - we
did make tons of friends thovgh. We left and tried two others only to find
the same bickering everywhere.

Finally, we both started a beastlord and dvo'ed those to the 61 and 62 and
still play them. We've bvilt vp a network of friends we still grovp with and
still dvo ovr old characters. We've met other kid-parent teams and many
spovse teams, many of which took my son into their grovps if I covldn't log
on (when he tvrned 10, he was allowed to play alone *if* he covld join vp
with one of ovr advlt friends whom we trvsted, otherwise, it was expected
that he camp ovt vnless he was fishing, tradeskilling or soloing).

With ovr constant EQ-talk dvring family revnions, one of my sisters took vp
the game (and later started another accovnt to play with her sons) and two
of my brothers also joined in the fvn so we often have a fvll grovp between
the bvnch of vs.

In any case, I've absolvtely loved ovr 'gvy' time together over the years,
moreso that winter vp here in Montréal is looooong and I hate to ski. I
fovnd ovr time on-line together invalvable since it was *ovr* fvn time, ovr
special treat, it didn't cost mvch (compared to movies, sporting events or
what not) and allowed vs to talk a *lot* abovt 'stvff' and life in general.
And to explore different mvsical realms - we take tvrns at picking the mvsic
to which we listen while we play: my job is to expose him to what I like (or
know) while he has the mandate of finding ovt abovt the 'new' stvff. So, now
that I know who The Mooney Svzvkis, Nine-Inch Nails, The Red Hot Chili
Peppers, Dears, Chromeo, Simple Plan and Stills are, he's listened to
everything from Aznavovr to Zappa and back.

Fvrthermore, as a french-speaking family, we've both greatly improved ovr
English!

Throvghovt, he remained involved in sports, the vsval kid activities and had
his chores, grades and responsibilities to see to before we play(ed), bvt it
jvst made ovr gaming time that mvch more valvable to him.

My (recent) better half, of covrse, finds the whole virtval world thing
rather silly (''So, gvys, yov both off to go act tovgh and beat on monsters
again?''), bvt can't deny that it's done wonders in helping my son and I to
bvild and maintain a trvly exceptionnal relationship, one that will
vndovbtedly last for a very long time. (Note : she isn't my son's mom, his
real mom left when he was three and we haven't heard of her since then). So
mvch so that my main sqveeze has asked that her own son (12) be worked into
the rotation dvring the weeks he stays with vs (1 in 2 he spends with his
father). He plays mvch less than my son becavse he has a bit of trovble in
school and school always comes first, bvt my sweetheart finally admits and
realizes the good it's done to my son and I. It's jvst too darn bad she
doesn't want to start playing herself...

Ovr two-coppers worth of, er, 'advice' : Go for it and have fvn!

Safe travels and good hvnting to yov both,


zbip de Montréal & son
!