How Does Data Work?

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Would someone mind explaining how cellular data connections work?

I have a 1X phone with a Verizon account. I also have a USB data cable. With
Windows XP and no other software I was able to create a dialup network
connection to my ISP that worked just fine. The cell phone "modem" reported a
connection of 115K, but that of course was just the cable to the cell phone. The
actual data connection was considerably slower.

Assuming Verizon "broadband" isn't available in my area, is there a faster way
to make a connection? I thought I read that Verizon could be my ISP - is that
true?

I also noticed that "dialer" software is available from someone, but is that
needed when I have Windows XP?

I should also say that I do not have any data add-ons. I assume that data
connections will consume minutes, but that unlimited nights and weekends apply
to data connections, just like voice calls. Correct?

Thank you for answering some very basic questions!
15 answers Last reply
More about data work
  1. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    In my area 1xrtt data runs on a
    throughput vs time test at anywhere
    from 20 kb/sec to 200 kb/sec.
  2. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:

    > I have a 1X phone with a Verizon account. I also have a USB data cable. With
    > Windows XP and no other software I was able to create a dialup network
    > connection to my ISP that worked just fine. The cell phone "modem" reported a
    > connection of 115K, but that of course was just the cable to the cell phone. The
    > actual data connection was considerably slower.
    >
    > Assuming Verizon "broadband" isn't available in my area, is there a faster way
    > to make a connection? I thought I read that Verizon could be my ISP - is that
    > true?

    Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you dialing to get
    connected?

    > I should also say that I do not have any data add-ons. I assume that data
    > connections will consume minutes, but that unlimited nights and weekends apply
    > to data connections, just like voice calls. Correct?

    Whoa, be VERY careful with that. Data use will only count against your
    minutes if you have the MOU flag on your account. If you don't have it,
    and don't ahve any sort of data plan, then you're probably getting
    charged on a per-kilobute basis (which can really add up).

    --
    E-mail fudged to thwart spammers.
    Transpose the c's and a's in my e-mail address to reply.
  3. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Isaiah Beard wrote:
    > Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    >
    >> I have a 1X phone with a Verizon account. I also have a
    >> USB data cable. With Windows XP and no other software I
    >> was able to create a dialup network connection to my ISP
    >> that worked just fine. The cell phone "modem" reported a
    >> connection of 115K, but that of course was just the
    >> cable to the cell phone. The actual data connection was
    >> considerably slower.
    >>
    >> Assuming Verizon "broadband" isn't available in my area,
    >> is there a faster way to make a connection? I thought I
    >> read that Verizon could be my ISP - is that true?
    >
    > Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you
    > dialing to get connected?

    You can to circuit switched data to any dial-up number.
    If you are going to do packet data (1xRTT) VZW would
    *have* to be your "ISP", right?.

    -Quick
  4. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Quick wrote:
    > Isaiah Beard wrote:
    >> Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    >>
    >>> I have a 1X phone with a Verizon account. I also have a
    >>> USB data cable. With Windows XP and no other software I
    >>> was able to create a dialup network connection to my ISP
    >>> that worked just fine. The cell phone "modem" reported a
    >>> connection of 115K, but that of course was just the
    >>> cable to the cell phone. The actual data connection was
    >>> considerably slower.
    >>>
    >>> Assuming Verizon "broadband" isn't available in my area,
    >>> is there a faster way to make a connection? I thought I
    >>> read that Verizon could be my ISP - is that true?
    >>
    >> Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you
    >> dialing to get connected?
    >
    > You can to circuit switched data to any dial-up number.
    > If you are going to do packet data (1xRTT) VZW would
    > *have* to be your "ISP", right?.

    Wow... I was trying to figure out how that sentence got
    so incredibly mangled... Change "to" to "do" and

    "You can to circuit switched data to any dial-up number".

    changes from gibberish to simply a poor sentence.

    "You can do circuit switched..."

    -Quick
  5. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:

    >Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you dialing to get
    >connected?
    >

    I think that's true only if I were to use #777. My first test was just to dial
    my regular local ISP number. As far as Verizon is concerned, that is no
    different than a voice call. The problem is that the speeds are quite slow -
    about 14.4kbps.

    >
    >Whoa, be VERY careful with that. Data use will only count against your
    >minutes if you have the MOU flag on your account. If you don't have it,
    >and don't ahve any sort of data plan, then you're probably getting
    >charged on a per-kilobute basis (which can really add up).

    Thanks - checked the web page and it looks like calling my ISP is just billed as
    a voice call.

    Next step is to see what it takes to get a 1X data plan activated.
  6. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    > Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you
    >> dialing to get connected?
    >>
    >
    > I think that's true only if I were to use #777. My first
    > test was just to dial my regular local ISP number. As far
    > as Verizon is concerned, that is no different than a
    > voice call. The problem is that the speeds are quite slow
    > - about 14.4kbps.

    Technically, no. It is not a voice call.
    You are probably not just dialing the number from the
    keypad but have the number in your modem configuration.
    When you do a connect the phone will dial the number
    and tell the network that it is a data call. The network
    will (most likely) use a different codec or codec rate,
    turn off silence suppression, etc. So at the call setup
    level VZW does, and needs to, know that it is a data
    call.

    How they treat it for billing is a whole different matter.

    -Quick
  7. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    > Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you dialing to get
    >> connected?
    >>
    >
    > I think that's true only if I were to use #777. My first test was
    > just to dial my regular local ISP number. As far as Verizon is
    > concerned, that is no different than a voice call. The problem is
    > that the speeds are quite slow - about 14.4kbps.
    >
    >>
    >> Whoa, be VERY careful with that. Data use will only count against
    >> your minutes if you have the MOU flag on your account. If you don't
    >> have it, and don't ahve any sort of data plan, then you're probably
    >> getting charged on a per-kilobute basis (which can really add up).
    >
    > Thanks - checked the web page and it looks like calling my ISP is
    > just billed as a voice call.
    >
    > Next step is to see what it takes to get a 1X data plan activated.

    NO PLAN! NO PLAN! NO PLAN!!!!

    It is an OPTION..... to your current plan.... not a plan of it's own!

    The NationalAccess is FASTER than a dial-up, and CAN NEVER EVER EVER work,
    if you dial a regular phone number....you MUST dial #777...

    Look for a section of your bill (either online or on paper) that has a
    heading and options like:
    Enhanced services:
    Call Delivery Voice Mail, IQ Service Package, TXT Msg W Per Msg
    Charges, Caller ID, Message Waiting Ind, New Every Two,
    Streamline Billing, In Calling Natl 1000 Mins, Natl Enhanced Svc
    Access

    That option "Natl Enhanced Svc Access" usually says you have MOU available.
  8. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    "Peter Pan" <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:

    >It is an OPTION..... to your current plan.... not a plan of it's own!
    >
    >The NationalAccess is FASTER than a dial-up, and CAN NEVER EVER EVER work,
    >if you dial a regular phone number....you MUST dial #777...
    >
    >Look for a section of your bill (either online or on paper) that has a
    >heading and options like:
    >Enhanced services:
    >Call Delivery Voice Mail, IQ Service Package, TXT Msg W Per Msg
    >Charges, Caller ID, Message Waiting Ind, New Every Two,
    >Streamline Billing, In Calling Natl 1000 Mins, Natl Enhanced Svc
    >Access
    >
    >That option "Natl Enhanced Svc Access" usually says you have MOU available.

    Thank you!
  9. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    > "Peter Pan" <Marcs1102NOSPAM@HotmailNOSPAM.com> wrote:
    >
    >> It is an OPTION..... to your current plan.... not a plan of it's own!
    >>
    >> The NationalAccess is FASTER than a dial-up, and CAN NEVER EVER EVER
    >> work, if you dial a regular phone number....you MUST dial #777...
    >>
    >> Look for a section of your bill (either online or on paper) that has
    >> a heading and options like:
    >> Enhanced services:
    >> Call Delivery Voice Mail, IQ Service Package, TXT Msg W Per Msg
    >> Charges, Caller ID, Message Waiting Ind, New Every Two,
    >> Streamline Billing, In Calling Natl 1000 Mins, Natl Enhanced Svc
    >> Access
    >>
    >> That option "Natl Enhanced Svc Access" usually says you have MOU
    >> available.
    >
    > Thank you!

    If that is on your bill, there is one other piece of info you will need..
    You have to put in the following for account athorization
    10 digit phone number (no spaces or punctauation and domain IE
    1234567890@vzw3g.com password = vzw
  10. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Quick wrote:
    > Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    >
    >>Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you
    >>>dialing to get connected?
    >>>
    >>
    >>I think that's true only if I were to use #777. My first
    >>test was just to dial my regular local ISP number. As far
    >>as Verizon is concerned, that is no different than a
    >>voice call. The problem is that the speeds are quite slow
    >>- about 14.4kbps.
    >
    > Technically, no. It is not a voice call.
    > You are probably not just dialing the number from the
    > keypad but have the number in your modem configuration.
    > When you do a connect the phone will dial the number
    > and tell the network that it is a data call. The network
    > will (most likely) use a different codec or codec rate,
    > turn off silence suppression, etc. So at the call setup
    > level VZW does, and needs to, know that it is a data
    > call.

    Voice calls and data calls are two different types of calls, handled
    differently by your phone.

    With data, your phone is really not a "MOdulator/DEModulator". The data
    from the cable is sent over the air as digital data to the VZW system,
    and no tones are involved. If you use #777 as your dial string, the data
    is then just directly dumped onto the Internet. If you use an ISP phone
    number, the VZW system dials your ISP over a 56Kbs modem, which converts
    the data into tones and sends it over the landline phone system to your
    ISP. This ISP connection is limited to the "old" 14.4Kbs QNC system, not
    the newer 1xRTT "National Access" system or even newer EV/DO system.

    With voice calls, your voice is digitized, and then that data is sent
    over the air. This is where codecs and such come in. These codecs are
    designed to be lossy to make the data stream smaller but still have the
    voice sound "OK" to the human ear. These losses mean that the tones of a
    regular modem would get mangled, which is why you cannot use a regular
    modem or FAX modem with a digital cellular phone.
  11. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    What about just having Enhanced Svc Access, missing the Natl?

    Enhanced Services: 3-Way Calling , Busy Transfer, Call Forwarding, No
    Answer
    Transfer, Call Waiting, Call Delivery, TXT MSG W Per MSG
    Charges, Caller ID, Message Waiting Ind, New Every Two,
    Streamline Billing, PIX-FLIX Pay Per MSG, Voice Mail Plus, Natl
    Enhanced Svc Access, IN Calling Natl Unlim Pri, TXT MSG-100
    MSGS-$2.99, Americas Choice LD

    Thanks, Tim

    CharlesH wrote:
    > Quick wrote:
    >
    >> Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    >>
    >>> Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you
    >>>> dialing to get connected?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I think that's true only if I were to use #777. My first
    >>> test was just to dial my regular local ISP number. As far
    >>> as Verizon is concerned, that is no different than a
    >>> voice call. The problem is that the speeds are quite slow
    >>> - about 14.4kbps.
    >>
    >>
    >> Technically, no. It is not a voice call.
    >> You are probably not just dialing the number from the
    >> keypad but have the number in your modem configuration.
    >> When you do a connect the phone will dial the number
    >> and tell the network that it is a data call. The network
    >> will (most likely) use a different codec or codec rate,
    >> turn off silence suppression, etc. So at the call setup
    >> level VZW does, and needs to, know that it is a data
    >> call.
    >
    >
    > Voice calls and data calls are two different types of calls, handled
    > differently by your phone.
    >
    > With data, your phone is really not a "MOdulator/DEModulator". The data
    > from the cable is sent over the air as digital data to the VZW system,
    > and no tones are involved. If you use #777 as your dial string, the data
    > is then just directly dumped onto the Internet. If you use an ISP phone
    > number, the VZW system dials your ISP over a 56Kbs modem, which converts
    > the data into tones and sends it over the landline phone system to your
    > ISP. This ISP connection is limited to the "old" 14.4Kbs QNC system, not
    > the newer 1xRTT "National Access" system or even newer EV/DO system.
    >
    > With voice calls, your voice is digitized, and then that data is sent
    > over the air. This is where codecs and such come in. These codecs are
    > designed to be lossy to make the data stream smaller but still have the
    > voice sound "OK" to the human ear. These losses mean that the tones of a
    > regular modem would get mangled, which is why you cannot use a regular
    > modem or FAX modem with a digital cellular phone.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 12:29:07 -0800, Quick wrote:

    >You can to circuit switched data to any dial-up number.
    >If you are going to do packet data (1xRTT) VZW would
    >*have* to be your "ISP", right?.

    Yes, but a very limited service one --- all it provides is access and name servers; you can use the limited access to connect to other providers' servers if they permit in order to access and send mail, access newsgroups, etc.
  13. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    What absolute nonsense. vzw NA is my sole internet access. vzw
    provides a connection to the internet, NOT internet services.
    However, nothing more is needed. I use free services to access
    pop/smtp email services and an usenet. Of course the web, telnet,
    ftp, etc are all available protocols also. No ISP is needed.

    DB

    On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 02:02:35 -0500 (EST), "Philip R. Mann"
    <prmlaw@NOSPAMnyc.rr.com> wrote:

    >On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 12:29:07 -0800, Quick wrote:
    >
    >>You can to circuit switched data to any dial-up number.
    >>If you are going to do packet data (1xRTT) VZW would
    >>*have* to be your "ISP", right?.
    >
    >Yes, but a very limited service one --- all it provides is access and name servers; you can use the limited access to connect to other providers' servers if they permit in order to access and send mail, access newsgroups, etc.
    >
  14. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Huh?
    A bit further down in that list is "Natl Enhanced Svc Access"... the line
    before has the word "Natl"...

    tjp wrote:
    > What about just having Enhanced Svc Access, missing the Natl?
    >
    > Enhanced Services: 3-Way Calling , Busy Transfer, Call Forwarding, No
    > Answer
    > Transfer, Call Waiting, Call Delivery, TXT MSG W Per MSG
    > Charges, Caller ID, Message Waiting Ind, New Every Two,
    > Streamline Billing, PIX-FLIX Pay Per MSG, Voice Mail Plus, Natl
    > Enhanced Svc Access, IN Calling Natl Unlim Pri, TXT MSG-100
    > MSGS-$2.99, Americas Choice LD
    >
    > Thanks, Tim
    >
    > CharlesH wrote:
    >> Quick wrote:
    >>
    >>> Clark W. Griswold, Jr. wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Isaiah Beard <sacredpoet@sacredpoet.com> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Technically, Verizon should be your ISP. What are you
    >>>>> dialing to get connected?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I think that's true only if I were to use #777. My first
    >>>> test was just to dial my regular local ISP number. As far
    >>>> as Verizon is concerned, that is no different than a
    >>>> voice call. The problem is that the speeds are quite slow
    >>>> - about 14.4kbps.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Technically, no. It is not a voice call.
    >>> You are probably not just dialing the number from the
    >>> keypad but have the number in your modem configuration.
    >>> When you do a connect the phone will dial the number
    >>> and tell the network that it is a data call. The network
    >>> will (most likely) use a different codec or codec rate,
    >>> turn off silence suppression, etc. So at the call setup
    >>> level VZW does, and needs to, know that it is a data
    >>> call.
    >>
    >>
    >> Voice calls and data calls are two different types of calls, handled
    >> differently by your phone.
    >>
    >> With data, your phone is really not a "MOdulator/DEModulator". The
    >> data from the cable is sent over the air as digital data to the VZW
    >> system, and no tones are involved. If you use #777 as your dial
    >> string, the data is then just directly dumped onto the Internet. If
    >> you use an ISP phone number, the VZW system dials your ISP over a
    >> 56Kbs modem, which converts the data into tones and sends it over
    >> the landline phone system to your ISP. This ISP connection is
    >> limited to the "old" 14.4Kbs QNC system, not the newer 1xRTT
    >> "National Access" system or even newer EV/DO system. With voice calls,
    >> your voice is digitized, and then that data is sent
    >> over the air. This is where codecs and such come in. These codecs are
    >> designed to be lossy to make the data stream smaller but still have
    >> the voice sound "OK" to the human ear. These losses mean that the
    >> tones of a regular modem would get mangled, which is why you cannot
    >> use a regular modem or FAX modem with a digital cellular phone.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

    Well, that's why I put "ISP" in quotes. Technically,
    the basic function of an ISP is to provide internet
    access. The additional services are differentiators.

    The only common problem that people encounter
    is when they have an ISP (and their email account)
    at home and they can't send email through their
    SMTP server because it does not allow relay. For
    many it's just easier to use their home IPS's dialup
    access to do this. Newsgroups... I don't use my
    pda phone as a modem and I don't browse
    newsgroups on it (too much access to usenet
    as it is...).

    Although I find it easy, I think setting up indirect
    email and alternate usenet access, etc., crosses
    that technical knowledge and/or amount of effort
    line for many.

    -Quick


    d b wrote:
    > What absolute nonsense. vzw NA is my sole internet
    > access. vzw provides a connection to the internet, NOT
    > internet services. However, nothing more is needed. I
    > use free services to access pop/smtp email services and
    > an usenet. Of course the web, telnet, ftp, etc are all
    > available protocols also. No ISP is needed.
    >
    > DB
    >
    > On Mon, 14 Mar 2005 02:02:35 -0500 (EST), "Philip R. Mann"
    > <prmlaw@NOSPAMnyc.rr.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 12:29:07 -0800, Quick wrote:
    >>
    >>> You can to circuit switched data to any dial-up number.
    >>> If you are going to do packet data (1xRTT) VZW would
    >>> *have* to be your "ISP", right?.
    >>
    >> Yes, but a very limited service one --- all it provides
    >> is access and name servers; you can use the limited
    >> access to connect to other providers' servers if they
    >> permit in order to access and send mail, access
    >> newsgroups, etc.
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