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2nd cheapest i7 desktop from Newegg to run modern games + new question

Last response: in Video Games
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October 3, 2012 3:22:15 PM

Hey guys,

I was wondering if this computer could play modern games at their suggested or max settings without any problems:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

The 1 reviewer said that it's not a gaming PC. But according to game-debate.com, the only thing it really needs is a better graphics card.

4GB of ram is enough, right ?
64 bit operating system, does that make a difference ?

So if i get a mid-level graphics card, and maybe change the ram to 8GB, would it be able to do it ?

a game example would be max payne 3
October 3, 2012 3:37:16 PM

It will need a GPU upgrade otherwise it will barely play modern games on low or medium. Looking at the case I can tell you there's going to be little to no airflow, your computer is going to melt or shutdown all the time due to overheating if you added a GPU. Infact, will a dedicated GPU even fit in that case? Plus you'll need to get a new & better PSU because pre-built systems have terrible PSU's. Plus it will need an aftermarket CPU cooler.

i7's are not meant for gaming. Desktop i5's and i7's are exactly the same performance when gaming.

Most games use 2-4GB of RAM (without ANY multitasking whatsoever) and 4GB WILL suffice although I recommend it least 6GB preferably 8gb so that you have some lee-way.

64 bit is better, it allows you to utilize more RAM etc.

You'd need it least a GTX 570 in order to play games on max settings smoothly. 8GB wouldn't really do anything.

At a $650 budget (im guessing your budget is that) you will NOT be able to find a pre-built system that can play games on max settings unless you build one yourself and overclock all the time. Even $1000+ pre-built systems always include crap GPU or crap something.
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a c 291 U Graphics card
October 3, 2012 3:42:33 PM

That thing is overpriced. It will not even play most games at all on minimum settings. It's pointless to talk about max settings.
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October 3, 2012 4:14:51 PM

The computer is completly unsutible for gaming. The case is a desktop form factor and only supports low profile graphics cards. The fastest low profile card I have found is a ATI 7750 which will play some games at lowish resolution (720p) it would struggle with any thing else.

Also the PSU is only rated at 240w and has no PCI-e power connectors.

This computer is a business workhorse and not a gaming PC in any way.
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October 11, 2012 6:39:13 AM

I Seeeeeeeee.

So when buying a PC soley to play games, what does one have to look out for ?


I'm guessing:

a capable graphics card
dual cores
4-8 GB of RAM
64 bit OS
atleast 500 watts in the PSU


Is that the whole lot, or is there anything else ?


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a c 109 U Graphics card
October 11, 2012 7:45:07 AM

Build your own.
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October 11, 2012 8:17:57 AM

I just don't want to buy everything, try to put it all together, and end up frying or breaking something.

I mean, how much money is saved anyway when building a computer on your own ?
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a b U Graphics card
October 11, 2012 10:00:50 AM

If you shop around alot a prebuilt PC can be bought for around 20% more than the parts but many are alot more than that. Its also hard to find a prebuilt PC that has a good graphics card.
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October 11, 2012 10:39:10 AM

Graphics card aside,
did i list all the core requirements for PC gaming ?


Browsing newegg, the trends seems to be:

- low quality graphics card
- less than 500 watt PSU

+ i5 CPU
+ 4-8 GB of RAM
+ 64 bit OS


Do you void the warranty if you replace parts ?
like the graphics card or PSU ?
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a c 291 U Graphics card
October 12, 2012 7:18:46 AM

That depends on the manufacturer of the PC. The prebuilt PCs also tend to have inferior motherboards and cases.

Just a note: by building your own computer it's almost impossible to break or fry something, unless you do it on purpose.

Check this video out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_56kyib-Ls
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October 14, 2012 4:55:50 AM

ostrich2 said:
I just don't want to buy everything, try to put it all together, and end up frying or breaking something.

I mean, how much money is saved anyway when building a computer on your own ?


Trust me, I had the exact same worries. I built my first computer like a week ago and am loving it am not regretting building my own. I managed to cut myself, overuse thermal paste and almost seriously damaged my motherboard and despite that in the end it works fine and performs excellent. So even if you're a klutz like me you'll be able to build it without worries.

Building your own computer automatically allows you to save hundreds, WITH getting better parts. Then if you get things on sale, you're saving even more. I strongly recommend you build your own unless you're willing to spend it least $2000+ on a pre-built system and still having to get a better graphics card because like someone else pointed out pre-built systems always use crap GPU.
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October 18, 2012 2:08:33 AM

alrighty,

seems like a lot of work




but for the person that's just really adamant about buying a pre-built computer, how can you tell if the motherboard is inferior or just alright or actually pretty good ?


and


same goes for the computer case ?
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October 18, 2012 3:20:37 AM

Prebuilt pcs usually have crap for PSU, motherboard etc because those aren't specs that are posted or that anyone looks at. Also prebuilts often have no expansion room because it costs more to add more pcie lanes etc.

Building a computer is easy, just follow the directions(and use a antistatic wrist band)

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a c 291 U Graphics card
October 18, 2012 5:18:29 AM

ostrich2 said:
alrighty,

seems like a lot of work




but for the person that's just really adamant about buying a pre-built computer, how can you tell if the motherboard is inferior or just alright or actually pretty good ?


and


same goes for the computer case ?


Google the model number and write review next to it. If you're not planning to overclock, then there's no reason to do it - all motherboards will work and there aren't any advantages getting one board over another (except if one has more USB ports, for example). Getting H61 or B75 board would be all you'd need then. However, if you're going to overclock, then you should look at Z77 boards and read its review before buying it. Tom's Hardware has an excellent article on that:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/z77-express-ivy-bri...

About the case: there isn't really any difference about getting those. However, I'd suggest looking at youtube videos of those cases - that way you can judge if you like how it looks better :) .
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October 18, 2012 5:54:51 AM

You can buy computers built from some one else for a better price then what NewEgg( pre built) sells. Falcon Northwest for high end expensive comps with great customer service or a company like CyperPower that makes good computers where you can choose what parts you want and it will cost you about 10-20% higher then build it yourself. Prices will vary so it depends.

You have to add in shipping costs of the parts on building your own plus the cost of Windows. Best thing is check out a place like Cyper Power, have a budget. Configure a computer see what it costs then take all all those parts and price them individually and then add it up and see how much cheaper it is to build your own or have somebody else do it. Also, local computer shops are usually cheap too so call around. A local shop might build you one cheaper then an online place.

For the 650.00 you plan on spending for a pre built, you can build yourself a pretty decent computer.

Happy building, the Prisoner.
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December 4, 2012 6:07:36 AM

hey guys

i used cyberpower's intel configurator and ordered myself an i5 on cyber monday

it's yet to arrive in the mail

but one thing i think i'll need help with is the operating system or lack there of


I'm not really digging on windows 8 and I don't really like windows 7 because of some compatibility issues

I have windows xp professional, and didn't want to buy windows 7 or 8


in the configurator, there was a deal going on,

it was a 2TB HD for the primary
and
a 64GB SSD for the secondary


How do i make it so the secondary, the SSD, is the primary drive ?
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December 4, 2012 6:36:24 AM

You can buy computers built from some one else for a better price then what NewEgg( pre built) sells.
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a c 291 U Graphics card
December 4, 2012 8:26:49 AM

ostrich2 said:
hey guys

i used cyberpower's intel configurator and ordered myself an i5 on cyber monday

it's yet to arrive in the mail

but one thing i think i'll need help with is the operating system or lack there of


I'm not really digging on windows 8 and I don't really like windows 7 because of some compatibility issues

I have windows xp professional, and didn't want to buy windows 7 or 8


in the configurator, there was a deal going on,

it was a 2TB HD for the primary
and
a 64GB SSD for the secondary


How do i make it so the secondary, the SSD, is the primary drive ?


Just install the operating system to SSD and it will become the primary one.
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December 4, 2012 1:58:59 PM

haha wow that's it ?

alright thanks
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a c 291 U Graphics card
December 4, 2012 2:35:55 PM

Yes. It's that simple :) .
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!