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silver heatsinks

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October 24, 2002 12:51:11 AM

does anyone know of any companies making heatsinks from silver? Silver conducts heat better than copper it would make sense and the added price would be worth it. just curious


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More about : silver heatsinks

October 24, 2002 3:25:32 AM

No it would not be worth it. The difference between copper and silver is very little. Look at the chart here http://www4.tomshardware.com/cpu/02q3/020916/cooler-01.... as you can see copper is 402 and silver is 422. Only around 4 percent difference. And if they made silver coolers (Which I really doubt they do) they would be extreamily expensive. If you must have good cooling system then a watercooling kit seems to be the way to go.
AREA_51
October 24, 2002 7:20:22 AM

that is 4% cooler baby that equals...(50c x .4) almost 20 degrees celcius if the fan could remove the heat and with enough voltage a fan will do what ever I want unless my math is flawed which it probably is and the heat conductivity has nothing to do with the heat transfer to air... curses maybe a water cooling system made from...silver! *evil laugh* silver block, silver radiator,silver pipes, mmmmmm silver turns me on

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October 24, 2002 7:23:04 AM

math was wrong it should be times .04 so it is 2 degrees c diff which is an improvement, 2c could be the diff between my stable speed of 1.8ghz with my xp and maybe a stable speed of 1.81 or 1.82 mmmmmm more speed is good!

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October 24, 2002 12:26:03 PM

Probably, instead of concentrating on the material that contacts the core (which already has good thermal conductivity characteristics) the manufacturers should do something about replacing air as their heat sink. Almost eveything else in the universe has better heat characteristics than air.

Is there a synonym for thesaurus?
October 24, 2002 5:55:00 PM

Why doesnt smeone come up with the idea of using the case as a heatsink. Imagine a copper case with fins, attached to it with thermal epoxy is the CPU and GPU, both of which are connected back to the board via wire. Alternatively, the mobo could be mounted up against the case with screws, squishing the processor against the copper! Imagine feeling the side of your case to see how hot your OC was running your CPU/GPU. No more fans, the case is so big that it would easily disspate all of the heat. You could even you it as a heater in the winter, warn the room by 1 or 2 degrees!

My sig's faster than yours, and it overclocks better too....
October 24, 2002 6:47:16 PM

Quote:
Why doesnt smeone come up with the idea of using the case as a heatsink.

Well, I guess because its really not that easy to transport the heat effectively to the case. Further, although the case has a large surface area, if its made of iron (usual case), it does not conduct the heat as well as alumium. So, you have to transport the heat to multiple points on the case in order to take advantage of the large area. Obviously, this is is not very elegant.
Quote:
You could even you it as a heater in the winter, warn the room by 1 or 2 degrees!

Although a PC uses a lot of power, I doubt that it would have any significant impact on the roomtemperature regardless of using the case as a heatsink. The 300W of the PC emits about the same heat as 5 pcs. 60W lightbulbs and they do not contribute much to the room temperature unless it is a very small room.




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a b K Overclocking
October 24, 2002 7:59:10 PM

"Why doesnt smeone come up with the idea of using the case as a heatsink."

This is a common approach among embedded systems where case dimensions are custom. For example, at work here, several products have the CPU shoved against the case wall with a piece of this thermally conductive foam rubber stuff in between them. I actually do this with one of my 10KRPM hard drives, but not my CPU.

Whether it would work or not comes down to the thermal resistance of the case in it's natural habitat, and is that low enough for the power output of the CPU you use. I imagine that not much testing has been done on this, across the range of available cases.
October 24, 2002 9:02:49 PM

Your math is still heavily flawed. According to your guesstimation we should see a 51% decrease in temp from aluminum to copper. Definetly not the case. This means alimunum @ say 50C would be 25C with copper, ya right. You would see NO difference, so spend your money. A reasonable silver ring is a couple hundred bucks, I'm guessing a heat sink would be a few thousand or more.

:eek:  <b>Who needs heatsinks and fans, I have an igloo</b> :eek: 
October 24, 2002 10:43:47 PM

I looked into it, a good sized block of reletivly pure silver (dont know exact size but it is enough for memory stick, cpu, and gpu and video memory) can be bought at a local store for 50 bucks, I could mill it myself too, not that hard with the right tools and silver is pretty soft. truly you are right that the difference may not even exist but still it is gonna kick ass to make my own heatsinks out of silver! I am gonna do it, I will tell you my results.

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October 24, 2002 11:25:18 PM

$50 is pretty resonable. Please post results,interesting to know. Might do it myself! Instead of buying cheap ramsinks for my VC. Keep all your millings and turn them into another!

:eek:  <b>Who needs heatsinks and fans, I have an igloo</b> :eek: 
October 25, 2002 5:47:11 AM

my computer contributes to the temp of my room considerably. when my computer is on, it is the hottest room in the house. its very hot when im encoding movies all day.

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October 28, 2002 9:18:27 PM

There is one thing that you have forgotten to take into consideration, and that is oxidization. Both Alumium and copper do not oxidize easily, but silver does. Think of your grandmother's silverware. It's stuck in a box and only taken out once or twice a year, but it still needs to be polished regularly to remove the tarnish.

Now think of the volume of air that passes through your case and compare it to the volume of air that passes through your grandma'a closed silverware box and you'll get the picture.

As things oxidize they start losing their thermal conductivity. That's why a silver waterblock is a definite no-no.

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October 29, 2002 2:34:38 AM

Ya, you are right with it. I agreed with it also. Thats why no much silver heaetsink that selling on the market also. If gotthat kind of money, better go for more quiet and efficience water cooling.

regards,
victor
October 31, 2002 11:46:44 AM

I think you better rethink the oxidation thing again... Copper and especially Aluminum will oxidize before silver. ALuminum starts to oxidize as soon as it his ail. If you touch copper you will see you finger print with in a few hours or so.. If you or a significant other wear jewelry, you will know that this is NOT hte case with silver. I do agree though, the cost vs. advantages, I dont think it would be worh it. I'm not sure about this but, does silver weigh more than copper? Also, silver is softer, how will that impact the base of a silver HS when you clamp it down on the CPU? Take care all.

Hang in there. It can only get better!
October 31, 2002 2:22:17 PM

Am I the only one wondering why someone would blow $50 + equipment and labour on a silver sink? So what if it conducts away heat 4% better than copper - it still has to transfer that heat away again, and AIR SUCKS. Why not take your cash and effort, build a copper (or silver, if you insist) water block? More effective, more efficient and MORE QUIET!
October 31, 2002 3:39:28 PM

I agree. Go water. I should be recieving an new 2nd gen Koolance case next week. If you are interested on how it goes, drop me an e-mail and I will respond with the results.

Hang in there. It can only get better!
November 1, 2002 11:46:46 AM

Cool... If you have the time drop me an e-mail to let me know how you made out. Good luck. Take care. :) 

Hang in there. It can only get better!
November 1, 2002 11:57:05 AM

Smurf. If you are really dead set on using silver for something then why not try this....Make a composite heat sink. The fins could be made of whatever, copper or aluminum. Once the heat gets to the fins the greatest contributor to heat dissapation is surface area and flow, not thermal conductivity of your material. However, getting that heat to the fins is where your silver can really help out. We've all seen how efficient a heat pipe design is. Thats because it transfers the heat quickly to the fins. I would suggest making a tapered plug of silver to put in a commercially available copper heat sink (volcano 7+ maybe). Cut a matching taper in the copper block and then pound it in with a deadblow mallet. Both are soft metals and should conform to one another

Is there a synonym for thesaurus?
November 1, 2002 6:32:12 PM

That is a great Idea.. I would make sure thay you use a GOOD quality thermal compound around the plug before you pound it in.

Hang in there. It can only get better!
November 1, 2002 9:32:30 PM

that is a good Idea, I am afraid it would raise the costs though as I dont have any volcano 7+'s lying around, I will try it with my plane jane volcano 7, replace the copper block with silver, just for practice cutting the stuff though, I will do it over the weekend and let you guys know what happens. probably there wont be any differance cuz I think the fins are just soddered to the aluminum block and sodder doesnt conduct heat that well.

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November 9, 2002 5:09:58 PM

Aluminum, copper, silver, maybe gold... hmmm why don't ask intel or AMD to make their CPU instead of producing heat, produce.. err ice?... then ppl would start looking for best heater system... ;)  damn good for summer! cool off ur room...
November 9, 2002 8:16:51 PM

...

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"C'mon DM,let's see some REAL monsters!" And then you turn the corner as the Dungeon Master chuckles... DM: "It hits and... Oh hold on... I need more dice"
November 10, 2002 10:05:19 PM

Sure whynot? Sounds like a great idea!
Using the same logic our computers can generate electricity to power the rest of the home and my car produces petrol the more i drive it!!! :eek: 

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November 10, 2002 10:08:09 PM

There have been heatsinks containing silver.
The Noisecontrol Silverado had a circular slug of silver at the bottom to transfer heat, and a couple have been silver plated to minimal effect.

The silver slug may be slightly better, but its not really worth it considering how close to copper it is.

Silver also has a lower resistance than copper, yet we dont see our powerlines made from it!

<b>LHGPooBaa + Evil Hamster Sidekick: Serving Toms Hardware community for 2 years as of the 11th of November</b>
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