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faxing from conexant d110 v.9x on winxp to old fax with sl..

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Anonymous
August 5, 2005 4:20:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

hi...

I need to add a delay to the modem commands in order to send faxes to a slow
old fax machine. Fax machine also answer phone; has recorded message.
Therefore not connecting after ring....need to add a pause or additional
waiting time to the string.

Can anyone help ?

Thanks very much,
Sara
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 1:33:18 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

You should be able to make your modem wait longer by adding a series of
commas to the end of the phone number it dials. Each comma adds a 2-3
second pause to the modem's dial function, enough of them should keep the
modem in dial mode long enough for the recorded message to finish before it
goes into listen mode.

Hal
--
Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com

"sabadoo" <sabadoo@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:A34D23AA-B10B-41EB-B8A2-0126C46DAB1C@microsoft.com...
> hi...
>
> I need to add a delay to the modem commands in order to send faxes to a
slow
> old fax machine. Fax machine also answer phone; has recorded message.
> Therefore not connecting after ring....need to add a pause or additional
> waiting time to the string.
>
> Can anyone help ?
>
> Thanks very much,
> Sara
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 2:39:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

"Hal Hostetler [MVP S/U]" <hhh@kvoa.com> wrote in message
news:eJUL5$jmFHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> You should be able to make your modem wait longer by adding a
> series of
> commas to the end of the phone number it dials. Each comma adds a
> 2-3
> second pause to the modem's dial function, enough of them should
> keep the
> modem in dial mode long enough for the recorded message to finish
> before it
> goes into listen mode.
>
> Hal
> --
> Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
> Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
> http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
> KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
> Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com
>
>

Does not the message begin after the fax machine answers? Any
delays prior to sending the dialing string through the phone network
should have no effect upon the machine which answers the call.


--
Earl F. Parrish
Anonymous
August 6, 2005 2:39:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

Dear Earl, Hal,

Thanks for your reply.

I thought of adding the adding commas (pauses) but didn't do so. No command
in initial dial string will be received by fax machine...won't it only go as
far as the PSTN, if I remember my basic datacom correctly ?

Is the modem in ''dial mode'' until it receives 'handshake'', a connect
statement from the receiving fax ?

And yes, message beigins after fax connects.

Any ideas where to find the script ? if someone can tell me where to
look....cuz but not super familiar with current changes in datacom esp. with
regard to MS XP.

I will give adding the commas a go. But I reckon that I need to add a
command somewhere else....

Any other ideas ?

Thanks,
Sara

"Earl F. Parrish" wrote:

>
> "Hal Hostetler [MVP S/U]" <hhh@kvoa.com> wrote in message
> news:eJUL5$jmFHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > You should be able to make your modem wait longer by adding a
> > series of
> > commas to the end of the phone number it dials. Each comma adds a
> > 2-3
> > second pause to the modem's dial function, enough of them should
> > keep the
> > modem in dial mode long enough for the recorded message to finish
> > before it
> > goes into listen mode.
> >
> > Hal
> > --
> > Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
> > Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
> > http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
> > KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
> > Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com
> >
> >
>
> Does not the message begin after the fax machine answers? Any
> delays prior to sending the dialing string through the phone network
> should have no effect upon the machine which answers the call.
>
>
> --
> Earl F. Parrish
>
>
>
Anonymous
August 8, 2005 5:09:35 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

The point here is that the sending modem will ignore whatever the receiving
modem is doing until it finishes transmitting it's dial string. Note that
the phone system should connect the receiving Fax machine as soon as the
last correct digit of the phone number is transmitted; this distant fax
machine is being dialed and should answer and send it's recorded message
while the sending modem is still chewing it's way through the commas at the
end of the dial string. Eventually the sending modem will run out of commas
and switch to listen mode and the receiving machine should finish it's
recorded announcement. If the sending machine finishes roughly the same
time as the receiving end, they should both begin their Fax negotiation
tones about the same time, and the system should work.


Hal
--
Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com

"Earl F. Parrish" <efparri@nowhere.world> wrote in message
news:fr0Je.2768$iE.1657@trnddc06...
>
> "Hal Hostetler [MVP S/U]" <hhh@kvoa.com> wrote in message
> news:eJUL5$jmFHA.764@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > You should be able to make your modem wait longer by adding a
> > series of
> > commas to the end of the phone number it dials. Each comma adds a
> > 2-3
> > second pause to the modem's dial function, enough of them should
> > keep the
> > modem in dial mode long enough for the recorded message to finish
> > before it
> > goes into listen mode.
> >
> > Hal
> > --
> > Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
> > Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
> > http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
> > KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
> > Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com
> >
> >
>
> Does not the message begin after the fax machine answers? Any
> delays prior to sending the dialing string through the phone network
> should have no effect upon the machine which answers the call.
>
>
> --
> Earl F. Parrish
>
>
Anonymous
August 9, 2005 3:06:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

"Hal Hostetler [MVP S/U]" <hhh@kvoa.com> wrote in message
news:uXBZaUFnFHA.4064@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> The point here is that the sending modem will ignore whatever the
> receiving
> modem is doing until it finishes transmitting it's dial string.
> Note that
> the phone system should connect the receiving Fax machine as soon
> as the
> last correct digit of the phone number is transmitted; this
> distant fax
> machine is being dialed and should answer and send it's recorded
> message
> while the sending modem is still chewing it's way through the
> commas at the
> end of the dial string. Eventually the sending modem will run out
> of commas
> and switch to listen mode and the receiving machine should finish
> it's
> recorded announcement. If the sending machine finishes roughly
> the same
> time as the receiving end, they should both begin their Fax
> negotiation
> tones about the same time, and the system should work.
>
>
The problem is that the sending modem broadcasts its CNG tones as
soon as it finishes dialing the last digit. This continues for
forty-five seconds. If the receiving modem does not start its
answer tones within the forty-five second time period with about
four to six seconds overlap, there will be no fax sent. The sending
modem does not care what the answering modem does prior to getting
the answer tones from it. The answer tones just have to be
broadcast long enough for the training of the two machines so that
the fax can be sent.

With a separate answering machine which answers all calls and the
fax machine is properly configured, the receiving fax machine
eavesdrops during the first six seconds of the outgoing announcement
to listen for the CNG tones. If they are detected, the fax machine
takes over the call. If there are no CNG tones the fax machine lets
the answering machine continue. As a matter of fact, if you have a
fax machine on the same phone line as a fax modem, the fax machine
will intercept outgoing faxes and stop you from reaching a distant
machine or fax modem.


--
Earl F. Parrish
Anonymous
August 10, 2005 1:48:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

I suspect my old USR fax modem may behave differently than newer modems
because I can add a series of commas to the end of a number to be dialed and
this particular modem will NOT switch on it's CNG tones until it finishes
dealing with the last comma at the end of the dial string. I can make it
completely ignore a fax machine I call with enough of them; the called
machine answers and sends CNG tones, but gives up and hangs after 30 seconds
or so when it gets no response from my modem (which is still busy with
commas).

Hal
--
Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com

"Earl F. Parrish" <efparri@nowhere.world> wrote in message
news:_zRJe.200$0d.181@trnddc07...

> The problem is that the sending modem broadcasts its CNG tones as
> soon as it finishes dialing the last digit. This continues for
> forty-five seconds. If the receiving modem does not start its
> answer tones within the forty-five second time period with about
> four to six seconds overlap, there will be no fax sent. The sending
> modem does not care what the answering modem does prior to getting
> the answer tones from it. The answer tones just have to be
> broadcast long enough for the training of the two machines so that
> the fax can be sent.
>
> With a separate answering machine which answers all calls and the
> fax machine is properly configured, the receiving fax machine
> eavesdrops during the first six seconds of the outgoing announcement
> to listen for the CNG tones. If they are detected, the fax machine
> takes over the call. If there are no CNG tones the fax machine lets
> the answering machine continue. As a matter of fact, if you have a
> fax machine on the same phone line as a fax modem, the fax machine
> will intercept outgoing faxes and stop you from reaching a distant
> machine or fax modem.
>
>
> --
> Earl F. Parrish
>
>
Anonymous
August 12, 2005 4:14:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.print_fax (More info?)

"Hal Hostetler [MVP S/U]" <hhh@kvoa.com> wrote in message
news:uZrOxaWnFHA.1212@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
>I suspect my old USR fax modem may behave differently than newer
>modems
> because I can add a series of commas to the end of a number to be
> dialed and
> this particular modem will NOT switch on it's CNG tones until it
> finishes
> dealing with the last comma at the end of the dial string. I can
> make it
> completely ignore a fax machine I call with enough of them; the
> called
> machine answers and sends CNG tones, but gives up and hangs after
> 30 seconds
> or so when it gets no response from my modem (which is still busy
> with
> commas).
>
> Hal
> --
> Hal Hostetler, CPBE -- hhh@kvoa.com
> Senior Engineer/MIS -- MS MVP-S/U -- WA7BGX
> http://www.kvoa.com -- "When News breaks, we fix it!"
> KVOA Television, Tucson, AZ. NBC Channel 4
> Still Cadillacin' - www.badnewsbluesband.com
>
I suspect that your modem was still sending out the CNG tones but
was ignoring the answer tones from the other modem. Some fax
machines have an International Call setting which sends the CNG
tones for a longer time if the dialing string is long and the
switching is slow. The forty-five seconds could expire before the
distant machine is reached without that feature.

The only way to really tell what is happening is to dial a voice
line and listen to the incoming fax attempt.

--
Earl F. Parrish
!