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Advice on the right build for me.

Last response: in Video Games
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October 29, 2012 4:28:23 PM

Hey I am looking to build a computer for my self in hopefully next year some time.

I do a lot of gaming. I would like to be able to run these games at high settings with plus 60fps @1080p
-Skyrim (MERP) http://www.moddb.com/mods/merp-middle-earth-roleplaying...
-AC:Revelations, AC3
-Medieval total War Shogun 2
-BF:Bad Company 2(probably BF3 as well)
-COD: MW2 & 3 (Not very demanding..so no worry's.)

I am wondering if I would be off with build 1, 2, or 3.

Here are a few builds I am considering:

1.
CPU: AMD FX-4170 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master V8 69.7 CFM Rifle Bearing CPU Cooler ($49.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock 990FX Extreme3 ATX AM3+/AM3 Motherboard ($119.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.93 @ Amazon)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 560 Ti 1GB Video Card ($179.98 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.49 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: Antec High Current Gamer 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: V7 LED236W3R-8N 75Hz 24.0" Monitor ($168.29 @ Amaz
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Total: 1051.6
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

2.
CPU: Intel Core i5-3330 3.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.88 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($50.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital VelociRaptor 1TB 3.5" 10000RPM Internal Hard Drive ($149.99 @ Microcenter)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Microcenter)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 560 Ti 1GB Video Card ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: FSP Group 500W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($81.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: V7 LED236W3R-8N 75Hz 24.0" Monitor ($168.29 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Asus BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($55.73 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1278.81
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

3.
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: EVGA Z77 FTW EATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($199.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.00 @ B&H)
Storage: Seagate Constellation ES 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($135.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($349.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Thermaltake VL200K1W2Z ATX Full Tower Case ($119.97 @ CompUSA)
Power Supply: FSP Group 700W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($135.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus BC-12B1ST/BLK/B/AS Blu-Ray Reader, DVD/CD Writer ($56.23 @ Amazon)
Monitor: V7 LED236W3R-8N 75Hz 24.0" Monitor ($168.29 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1697.41
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)


All opinions are welcome. figured I would ask on figure out which hardware would be best. lists were put together on PCpartpicker.com

More about : advice build

Best solution

October 29, 2012 4:39:46 PM

There's no discussion, the third one is the best. However, there are some pretty overpriced parts. For example, there's no reason to get gold certified power supply unit, or hard drive for $140. Let's combine the best of all three worlds:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.82 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($25.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($169.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Antec Neo Eco 520W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($46.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus VE247H 23.6" Monitor ($159.99 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($91.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1352.70
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
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October 29, 2012 4:53:38 PM

Whoops I more meant if I could get by with the lower price/components of 1. and still run those games.

Main concern, is the 560 ti. will that hand SG2:Total war?

But with the build that you just did Looks Like a good in-between. Thanks For the quick reply.
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October 29, 2012 5:09:57 PM

It will, just not on maximum settings :) .
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October 29, 2012 6:26:35 PM

Okay thanks.
My idea is to put aside some money $1000-$1500 for a computer. buying sometime early next year. I want to know what components I am getting so I can watch prices and hopefully catch a good deal on some of them.

And then Hopefully not have to upgrade for at least a few years.

I can run all those Games (Don't own AC3 or BF3) on low and mid settings (Cod High) with 25+fps
but not at 1080 with my current XPS 1800.
i5 650(2 core) @ 3.2
XFX 6670 ddr3 1gb.

so I am thinking I get a new rig that can run today's games in high or Max, and then in a few years, just play the new games of that time, at medium settings. which for me is fine as long as it is smooth.

Is that sound logic? or should I reconsider my plan?

Also Wouldn't a gold certified power supply unit last longer and not need to be upgraded as soon, as a say a bronze one?
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October 29, 2012 6:59:02 PM

That's very logical.

However, the power supply part may not be very accurate. Sure, theoretically it should last longer, but Antec unit will last as long, as it's very high build quality. And it's cheaper ;) .
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October 29, 2012 7:00:04 PM

The PSU certification relates to it's efficiency, not its' longevity afaik.

Given the same hardware, a gold cert one will use slightly less power from the wall over its lifetime than a bronze one. As long as you stick to a reputable brand and make sure the power draw from your system is well within the specificed output of the PSU, you will be fine.
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October 29, 2012 7:06:51 PM

kyzarvs said:
The PSU certification relates to it's efficiency, not its' longevity afaik.

Given the same hardware, a gold cert one will use slightly less power from the wall over its lifetime than a bronze one. As long as you stick to a reputable brand and make sure the power draw from your system is well within the specificed output of the PSU, you will be fine.


Ah okay, That makes sense. Thanks for the reply.
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November 5, 2012 3:10:17 PM

Quote:
There's no discussion, the third one is the best. However, there are some pretty overpriced parts. For example, there's no reason to get gold certified power supply unit, or hard drive for $140. Let's combine the best of all three worlds:


Think I will go with your suggestion, but just going to go with i5 3570 as I don't have any experience with overclocking no do I think I will need to. and a bigger power supply.
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November 5, 2012 5:50:52 PM

Even if you don't overclock now, when your CPU gets old, overclocking becomes very valuable. It's really worth the price increase, if it can get you an extra year.
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November 5, 2012 10:59:14 PM

Best answer selected by JBB-SaDo.
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November 5, 2012 11:00:01 PM

Sunius said:
Even if you don't overclock now, when your CPU gets old, overclocking becomes very valuable. It's really worth the price increase, if it can get you an extra year.


Okay, true I guess someday I may want more out of my machine.
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