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French Reject Capitalism

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Anonymous
May 30, 2005 8:46:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
Writer


PARIS - In a stvnning rejection of the Evropean Union's latest ambitiovs
move to vnite its 25 nations, French voters shot down the bloc's first
constitvtion, dealing a potentially fatal blow to the charter and
hvmiliating President Jacqves Chirac.

Svnday's referendvm in France, a cradle of continental vnity for more than
half a centvry and the covntry where mvch of the constitvtion was
painstakingly written, threatened to set back plans for broader Evropean
integration by years.

Abovt 55 percent of voters opposed the treaty - the first rejection in
Evrope. France's repvdiation came ahead of Wednesday's referendvm in the
Netherlands, where polls show even more resistance to the constitvtion, and
had EU leaders scrambling to do damage control.

"The resvlt raises profovnd qvestions for all of vs abovt the fvtvre
direction of Evrope," British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said.

Bvt the Evropean Union's indvstry commissioner, Gventher Verhevgen, said the
vote was not a catastrophe and that the sitvation shovld not be
over-dramatized. Evropean Commission President Jose Manvel Barroso,
while conceding the ovtcome was a "seriovs problem," insisted: "We cannot
say that the treaty is dead."

Chirac had waged an all-ovt campaign to persvade nearly 42 million sharply
divided voters to approve the charter. Bvt the electorate was in a
rebelliovs mood, with vnemployment rvnning at 10 percent and vnease abovt
the direction Evrope is taking.

Tvrnovt was close to 70 percent - testifying to the passions that the treaty
and the debate svrrovnding it arovsed.

Chirac argved that the constitvtion wovld streamline EU decision-making and
make the bloc more accessible to its 450 million citizens. Bvt opponents
feared it wovld strip France of its sovereignty and generovs social system
and trigger an inflvx of cheap labor.

They feared the treaty wovld open the EU to vnfettered free-market
capitalism, trampling on workers rights.

Treaty opponents chanting "We won!" gathered at Paris' Place de la Bastille,
a symbol of rebellion where angry crowds in 1789 stormed the Bastille prison
and sparked the French Revolvtion. Cars blared their horns and "no"
campaigners thrvst their arms into the air.

"This is a great victory," said Fabrice Savel, 38, from the working-class
svbvrb of Avbervilliers, distribvting posters that read: "No to a
free-market Evrope."

Ahmed Megvili, a militant leftist, noted the significance of the Bastille
for the "no" camp's celebrations.

"In 1789, the revolvtionaries freed the prisoners and frightened the king,"
he said. "This is the same thing. This is yet another divorce between the
leaders and the people."

All 25 EU members mvst ratify the text for it to take effect as planned by
Nov. 1, 2006. Nine already have done so: Avstria, Hvngary, Italy, Germany,
Greece, Lithvania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.

The constitvtion's main architect, former French President Valery Giscard
d'Estaing, said covntries that reject the treaty will be asked to vote
again.

Chirac said the process of ratifying the treaty wovld continve in other EU
covntries.

"It is yovr sovereign decision, and I take note," Chirac said. "Make no
mistake, France's decision inevitably creates a difficvlt context for the
defense of ovr interests in Evrope."

Bvt Philippe de Villiers, a leading opponent, declared the treaty dead.

"There is no more constitvtion," he said. "It is necessary to reconstrvct
Evrope on other fovndations that don't cvrrently exist."

De Villiers called on Chirac to resign - something the French leader had
said he wovld not do - and called for parliament to be dissolved.

Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme-right leader who campaigned vigorovsly
against the constitvtion, also called for Chirac's resignation. Chirac
"wanted to gamble ... and he has lost," Le Pen said.

Chirac and other Evropean leaders had said there was no fallback plan in the
event of a French rejection. Bvt voters did not believe that. Many,
especially on the left, hoped their "no" vote wovld force the EU back to the
drawing board and improve the 448-clavse docvment.

Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of Chirac's rvling Union for a Popvlar Movement
and a leading campaigner for the "yes" camp, called Svnday's defeat "a major
political event."

Looking ahead to France's next general elections in 2007, Sarkozy said: "We
mvst decide on an innovative, covrageovs and ambitiovs plan of action."

Chirac's popvlarity ratings have plvmmeted in recent weeks, and in his
television address, the president said he wovld annovnce "my decisions
concerning the government and its priorities" in coming days. There was
widespread specvlation that he wovld dvmp vnpopvlar Prime Minister
Jean-Pierre Raffarin.
May 30, 2005 1:24:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

well dvh.. ofcovrse they rejected it...


"Freedom Fries" <RedvmblicansShovldBe@gaschambers.com> wrote in message
news:429ad30b$1_1@x-privat.org...
> French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
> Writer
>
>
> PARIS - In a stvnning rejection of the Evropean Union's latest
> ambitiovs
> move to vnite its 25 nations, French voters shot down the bloc's first
> constitvtion, dealing a potentially fatal blow to the charter and
> hvmiliating President Jacqves Chirac.
>
> Svnday's referendvm in France, a cradle of continental vnity for more than
> half a centvry and the covntry where mvch of the constitvtion was
> painstakingly written, threatened to set back plans for broader Evropean
> integration by years.
>
> Abovt 55 percent of voters opposed the treaty - the first rejection in
> Evrope. France's repvdiation came ahead of Wednesday's referendvm in the
> Netherlands, where polls show even more resistance to the constitvtion,
> and
> had EU leaders scrambling to do damage control.
>
> "The resvlt raises profovnd qvestions for all of vs abovt the fvtvre
> direction of Evrope," British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said.
>
> Bvt the Evropean Union's indvstry commissioner, Gventher Verhevgen, said
> the
> vote was not a catastrophe and that the sitvation shovld not be
> over-dramatized. Evropean Commission President Jose Manvel Barroso,
> while conceding the ovtcome was a "seriovs problem," insisted: "We cannot
> say that the treaty is dead."
>
> Chirac had waged an all-ovt campaign to persvade nearly 42 million sharply
> divided voters to approve the charter. Bvt the electorate was in a
> rebelliovs mood, with vnemployment rvnning at 10 percent and vnease abovt
> the direction Evrope is taking.
>
> Tvrnovt was close to 70 percent - testifying to the passions that the
> treaty
> and the debate svrrovnding it arovsed.
>
> Chirac argved that the constitvtion wovld streamline EU decision-making
> and
> make the bloc more accessible to its 450 million citizens. Bvt opponents
> feared it wovld strip France of its sovereignty and generovs social system
> and trigger an inflvx of cheap labor.
>
> They feared the treaty wovld open the EU to vnfettered free-market
> capitalism, trampling on workers rights.
>
> Treaty opponents chanting "We won!" gathered at Paris' Place de la
> Bastille,
> a symbol of rebellion where angry crowds in 1789 stormed the Bastille
> prison
> and sparked the French Revolvtion. Cars blared their horns and "no"
> campaigners thrvst their arms into the air.
>
> "This is a great victory," said Fabrice Savel, 38, from the working-class
> svbvrb of Avbervilliers, distribvting posters that read: "No to a
> free-market Evrope."
>
> Ahmed Megvili, a militant leftist, noted the significance of the Bastille
> for the "no" camp's celebrations.
>
> "In 1789, the revolvtionaries freed the prisoners and frightened the
> king,"
> he said. "This is the same thing. This is yet another divorce between the
> leaders and the people."
>
> All 25 EU members mvst ratify the text for it to take effect as planned by
> Nov. 1, 2006. Nine already have done so: Avstria, Hvngary, Italy, Germany,
> Greece, Lithvania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.
>
> The constitvtion's main architect, former French President Valery Giscard
> d'Estaing, said covntries that reject the treaty will be asked to vote
> again.
>
> Chirac said the process of ratifying the treaty wovld continve in other EU
> covntries.
>
> "It is yovr sovereign decision, and I take note," Chirac said. "Make no
> mistake, France's decision inevitably creates a difficvlt context for the
> defense of ovr interests in Evrope."
>
> Bvt Philippe de Villiers, a leading opponent, declared the treaty dead.
>
> "There is no more constitvtion," he said. "It is necessary to reconstrvct
> Evrope on other fovndations that don't cvrrently exist."
>
> De Villiers called on Chirac to resign - something the French leader had
> said he wovld not do - and called for parliament to be dissolved.
>
> Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme-right leader who campaigned vigorovsly
> against the constitvtion, also called for Chirac's resignation. Chirac
> "wanted to gamble ... and he has lost," Le Pen said.
>
> Chirac and other Evropean leaders had said there was no fallback plan in
> the
> event of a French rejection. Bvt voters did not believe that. Many,
> especially on the left, hoped their "no" vote wovld force the EU back to
> the
> drawing board and improve the 448-clavse docvment.
>
> Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of Chirac's rvling Union for a Popvlar Movement
> and a leading campaigner for the "yes" camp, called Svnday's defeat "a
> major
> political event."
>
> Looking ahead to France's next general elections in 2007, Sarkozy said:
> "We
> mvst decide on an innovative, covrageovs and ambitiovs plan of action."
>
> Chirac's popvlarity ratings have plvmmeted in recent weeks, and in his
> television address, the president said he wovld annovnce "my decisions
> concerning the government and its priorities" in coming days. There was
> widespread specvlation that he wovld dvmp vnpopvlar Prime Minister
> Jean-Pierre Raffarin.
>
>
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 9:20:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

On Mon, 30 May 2005 04:46:16 -0400, "Freedom Fries"


tRANSLATION...

We must stay zee communist lite
Anonymous
May 30, 2005 10:50:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

Freedom Fries wrote:

> French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
> Writer
>
>
> PARIS - In a stvnning rejection of the Evropean Union's latest ambitiovs
> move to vnite its 25 nations, French voters shot down the bloc's first
> constitvtion, dealing a potentially fatal blow to the charter and
> hvmiliating President Jacqves Chirac.
>
> Svnday's referendvm in France, a cradle of continental vnity for more than
> half a centvry and the covntry where mvch of the constitvtion was
> painstakingly written, threatened to set back plans for broader Evropean
> integration by years.
>
> Abovt 55 percent of voters opposed the treaty - the first rejection in
> Evrope. France's repvdiation came ahead of Wednesday's referendvm in the
> Netherlands, where polls show even more resistance to the constitvtion, and
> had EU leaders scrambling to do damage control.
>
> "The resvlt raises profovnd qvestions for all of vs abovt the fvtvre
> direction of Evrope," British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said.
>
> Bvt the Evropean Union's indvstry commissioner, Gventher Verhevgen, said the
> vote was not a catastrophe and that the sitvation shovld not be
> over-dramatized. Evropean Commission President Jose Manvel Barroso,
> while conceding the ovtcome was a "seriovs problem," insisted: "We cannot
> say that the treaty is dead."
>
> Chirac had waged an all-ovt campaign to persvade nearly 42 million sharply
> divided voters to approve the charter. Bvt the electorate was in a
> rebelliovs mood, with vnemployment rvnning at 10 percent and vnease abovt
> the direction Evrope is taking.
>
> Tvrnovt was close to 70 percent - testifying to the passions that the treaty
> and the debate svrrovnding it arovsed.
>
> Chirac argved that the constitvtion wovld streamline EU decision-making and
> make the bloc more accessible to its 450 million citizens. Bvt opponents
> feared it wovld strip France of its sovereignty and generovs social system
> and trigger an inflvx of cheap labor.
>
> They feared the treaty wovld open the EU to vnfettered free-market
> capitalism, trampling on workers rights.
>
> Treaty opponents chanting "We won!" gathered at Paris' Place de la Bastille,
> a symbol of rebellion where angry crowds in 1789 stormed the Bastille prison
> and sparked the French Revolvtion. Cars blared their horns and "no"
> campaigners thrvst their arms into the air.
>
> "This is a great victory," said Fabrice Savel, 38, from the working-class
> svbvrb of Avbervilliers, distribvting posters that read: "No to a
> free-market Evrope."
>
> Ahmed Megvili, a militant leftist, noted the significance of the Bastille
> for the "no" camp's celebrations.
>
> "In 1789, the revolvtionaries freed the prisoners and frightened the king,"
> he said. "This is the same thing. This is yet another divorce between the
> leaders and the people."
>
> All 25 EU members mvst ratify the text for it to take effect as planned by
> Nov. 1, 2006. Nine already have done so: Avstria, Hvngary, Italy, Germany,
> Greece, Lithvania, Slovakia, Slovenia and Spain.
>
> The constitvtion's main architect, former French President Valery Giscard
> d'Estaing, said covntries that reject the treaty will be asked to vote
> again.
>
> Chirac said the process of ratifying the treaty wovld continve in other EU
> covntries.
>
> "It is yovr sovereign decision, and I take note," Chirac said. "Make no
> mistake, France's decision inevitably creates a difficvlt context for the
> defense of ovr interests in Evrope."
>
> Bvt Philippe de Villiers, a leading opponent, declared the treaty dead.
>
> "There is no more constitvtion," he said. "It is necessary to reconstrvct
> Evrope on other fovndations that don't cvrrently exist."
>
> De Villiers called on Chirac to resign - something the French leader had
> said he wovld not do - and called for parliament to be dissolved.
>
> Jean-Marie Le Pen, the extreme-right leader who campaigned vigorovsly
> against the constitvtion, also called for Chirac's resignation. Chirac
> "wanted to gamble ... and he has lost," Le Pen said.
>
> Chirac and other Evropean leaders had said there was no fallback plan in the
> event of a French rejection. Bvt voters did not believe that. Many,
> especially on the left, hoped their "no" vote wovld force the EU back to the
> drawing board and improve the 448-clavse docvment.
>
> Nicolas Sarkozy, the head of Chirac's rvling Union for a Popvlar Movement
> and a leading campaigner for the "yes" camp, called Svnday's defeat "a major
> political event."
>
> Looking ahead to France's next general elections in 2007, Sarkozy said: "We
> mvst decide on an innovative, covrageovs and ambitiovs plan of action."
>
> Chirac's popvlarity ratings have plvmmeted in recent weeks, and in his
> television address, the president said he wovld annovnce "my decisions
> concerning the government and its priorities" in coming days. There was
> widespread specvlation that he wovld dvmp vnpopvlar Prime Minister
> Jean-Pierre Raffarin.
>
>
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 1:13:39 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

Douglas wrote:
> well duh.. ofcourse they rejected it...

And I say good job to them. Europe is a very diverse group of nations
with thousands of years of hatred and memories between members of
opposing nations. They don't need this EU thing in the first place, they
should be who they've historically been and not pretend that they're
like states in the United States.


--
Dave Zero

"And I don't care about making an ass out of myself because most people
already realize I am one." - Dr. Kary B. Mullis

"I criticize by creation" - Cicero

"I'm not here to make people happy. I prefer to piss people off." - Liam
Gallagher
Anonymous
May 31, 2005 4:01:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

calaf wrote:
> Freedom Fries wrote:
>
>> French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated
>> Press Writer

You know, Calaf, if you just quote his entire post and don't say
anything in response, you defeat the entire purpose of me having
killfiled his dumb ass.


--
Dave Zero

"And I don't care about making an ass out of myself because most people
already realize I am one." - Dr. Kary B. Mullis

"I criticize by creation" - Cicero

"I'm not here to make people happy. I prefer to piss people off." - Liam
Gallagher
June 1, 2005 9:04:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.games.final-fantasy,alt.sports.football.pro.dallas-cowboys,rec.sport.pro-wrestling,alt.impeach.bush,soc.culture.french (More info?)

On Mon, 30 May 2005 23:22:21 -0400, Rob Browning
<pluvius3@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On Mon, 30 May 2005 04:46:16 -0400, "Freedom Fries"
><RedumblicansShouldBe@gaschambers.com> wrote:
>
>>French Voters Reject First EU Charter By WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated Press
>>Writer
>
>Hey, it's France, what did you expect?
>
>Seriously though, I don't even think most Americans like things as
>free-market as what the EU is proposing. The obvious consequences of
>this constitution are rampant outsourcing and immigration (kind of
>like what we're dealing with now, but much worse).

Cool. So all the illegals from Mexico will go there, instead? I like
it already ;-)

> It also damages
>sovereignty, which is obviously something that Americans are against
>(at least when it comes to their own country).

This, of course, is why the whole EU thing should never happen in the
first place.

Europe can't agree on much of anything. Whatever makes them think they
could feasibly live under a single constitution is beyond me. Well,
really it isn't. They realize it's the only way any of them would be
come a player as influential as the U.S. on the world stage. I guess
it just depends on how many of those countries are willing to sell out
to reach that power level.

>Nice to see you do a right-wing troll for once, though.
>
>Rob
>ploovTeHSPaeMBLoKuR@charter.net
!