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Cingular service in Maryland questions

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Anonymous
April 18, 2004 6:41:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Greetings,

I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will be
my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:

1. Are there any gotchas in moving the number that I should be aware of,
other than perhaps it taking a few days?

2. For the phone itself the V400 seems to be the best choice at the moment.
Taking away the camera feature, is there a better phone to choose right now?

3. I've read a few posts here about a V600. Anyone know the relase
date/price point on that? Would it be worth it to wait?

4. On the GSM coverage map all the areas that I travel to (major cities) are
covered. My question is how accurate do people find the coverage map?

5. How easy is it with Cingular to add extra services or take them off as I
find I use or not use certian things?

6. Should I go to a Cingular store or Best Buy to get set up?

Comments on any or all of these questions would be appreciated. Also I
didn't come accross a FAQ for this group so if there is one and this stuff
is addressed, I appoligize.

Duncan
April 18, 2004 10:35:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Duncan703 wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
> Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will be
> my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:
>
> 1. Are there any gotchas in moving the number that I should be aware of,
> other than perhaps it taking a few days?
>
> 2. For the phone itself the V400 seems to be the best choice at the moment.
> Taking away the camera feature, is there a better phone to choose right now?
>
> 3. I've read a few posts here about a V600. Anyone know the relase
> date/price point on that? Would it be worth it to wait?
>
> 4. On the GSM coverage map all the areas that I travel to (major cities) are
> covered. My question is how accurate do people find the coverage map?
>
> 5. How easy is it with Cingular to add extra services or take them off as I
> find I use or not use certian things?
>
> 6. Should I go to a Cingular store or Best Buy to get set up?
>
> Comments on any or all of these questions would be appreciated. Also I
> didn't come accross a FAQ for this group so if there is one and this stuff
> is addressed, I appoligize.
>
> Duncan


Are you attempting to go without a landline at your home? If so, I
trust you've given due consideration that public wireless voice
communications can, at times, be sketchy with regard to reliability issues.

Cellular carriers don't operate their service offerings from the same
statutory regulations that a landline carrier does.


--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 18, 2004 11:54:48 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <rN6dnRPL66GSUR_dRVn-vA@comcast.com>,
"Duncan703" <duncan703@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Greetings,
>
> I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
> Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will be
> my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:
>
> 1. Are there any gotchas in moving the number that I should be aware of,
> other than perhaps it taking a few days?

Often as much as a week. Landline --> Wireless ; some go smoothly, some
are nightmares. Make sure your landline account is paid in full. Good
luck, and report back.


>
> 2. For the phone itself the V400 seems to be the best choice at the moment.
> Taking away the camera feature, is there a better phone to choose right now?

Phone selection is a personal preference kind of thing.

>
> 3. I've read a few posts here about a V600. Anyone know the relase
> date/price point on that? Would it be worth it to wait?

AT&T already has the V600. Currently $174.99 at their website, and with
their new roaming agreements with Cingular, and coming merger, might be
best way to get a V600 if that's what your heart is set on. In less than
a year all ATTWS customers will be Cingular customers.

>
> 4. On the GSM coverage map all the areas that I travel to (major cities) are
> covered. My question is how accurate do people find the coverage map?

Maps are of such a small scale that small (under a mile across) dead
zones are omitted. Cingular coverage in the DC area however is good.



>> 5. How easy is it with Cingular to add extra services or take them
> off as I
> find I use or not use certian things?

Services easy; plan changes can be more of an issue.

>
> 6. Should I go to a Cingular store or Best Buy to get set up?

Or an independent dealer if you get a better price there or more
freebies (case, car charger etc). Check your Sunday newspaper. Use a
Gold MasterCard for the purchase to double the warranty. Typically you
get the activation fee waived with a 2 year warranty. It's $74.99 after
rebate if bought at the Cingular web site for a v400 currently.


http://welectronics.com/gsm/motorolaV600.asp lists an unlocked V600 for
$489, which in theory could be activated on the Cingular network. There
are folks (who I can't vouch for) selling it on eBay for ~ $400.

>
> Comments on any or all of these questions would be appreciated. Also I
> didn't come accross a FAQ for this group so if there is one and this stuff
> is addressed, I appoligize.
>
> Duncan
Related resources
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 12:28:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Whatever you do, do NOT listen to any suggestions from Phillippe disguised
as "Robert M". He is nothing but a trolling fool looking to cause trouble.

Chris

"Duncan703" <duncan703@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:rN6dnRPL66GSUR_dRVn-vA@comcast.com...
> Greetings,
>
> I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
> Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will be
> my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:
>
> 1. Are there any gotchas in moving the number that I should be aware of,
> other than perhaps it taking a few days?
>
> 2. For the phone itself the V400 seems to be the best choice at the
moment.
> Taking away the camera feature, is there a better phone to choose right
now?
>
> 3. I've read a few posts here about a V600. Anyone know the relase
> date/price point on that? Would it be worth it to wait?
>
> 4. On the GSM coverage map all the areas that I travel to (major cities)
are
> covered. My question is how accurate do people find the coverage map?
>
> 5. How easy is it with Cingular to add extra services or take them off as
I
> find I use or not use certian things?
>
> 6. Should I go to a Cingular store or Best Buy to get set up?
>
> Comments on any or all of these questions would be appreciated. Also I
> didn't come accross a FAQ for this group so if there is one and this stuff
> is addressed, I appoligize.
>
> Duncan
>
>
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 5:11:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <c5v385$6cr@library1.airnews.net>, Jer <gdunn@airmail.ten>
wrote:

> Are you attempting to go without a landline at your home? If so, I
> trust you've given due consideration that public wireless voice
> communications can, at times, be sketchy with regard to reliability issues.

and when a hurricane comes through, wireless is likely to be back online
days before a downed landline.
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 12:48:57 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

>
> Are you attempting to go without a landline at your home? If so, I
> trust you've given due consideration that public wireless voice
> communications can, at times, be sketchy with regard to reliability
issues.
>
>

Are you attempting to go without a horse at home? If so, I trust you've
given due consideration that horseless carriages are noisy polluters that
sometimes break.

The landline is DEAD, it's just being kept running by artificial means for
the moment. -Dave (dumped his landline a long time ago and GOOD
RIDDANCE!!!)
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 5:06:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <7d2dndUeO9kzVx7dRVn-gQ@comcast.com>,
"Dave C." <spammersdie@ahorribledeath.now> wrote:

> The landline is DEAD, it's just being kept running by artificial means for
> the moment.

Its what 10 or 12% of folks that have ceased having a landline?
It's not dead yet. There are valid reasons for keeping it, and valid
reasons for getting rid of it for different individuals.

20 years from now the answer might be different, but for now
different folks under different circumstances may correctly keep or get
rid of their land line.

Thus I object to those that say you must keep you land line, just as
much as I object to those that say you must get rid of it.
Anonymous
April 19, 2004 9:09:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote in message
news:c5v385$6cr@library1.airnews.net...
> Duncan703 wrote:
>
> > Greetings,
> >
> > I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
> > Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will
be
> > my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:

> Are you attempting to go without a landline at your home? If so, I
> trust you've given due consideration that public wireless voice
> communications can, at times, be sketchy with regard to reliability
issues.
>
> Cellular carriers don't operate their service offerings from the same
> statutory regulations that a landline carrier does.

Yes, I am going to be getting rid of my landline phone. Over the last few
months I've been condsidering this. I've discussed with friends and
co-workers trying to find a reason not to make this move.

1. In the area that I live and work, cel phones are as reliable as a land
line.
2. Most of my calling is considered either instate long distance or country
wide long distance.
3. I travel enough in the course of a year that a cel phone would be nice to
have.
4. I cannot find a landline billing deal that would save me more than about
$5 a month over a cel phone with the same features with my long distance
calling patterns. And once my travel calling is factored in, the cel is
cheaper.
5. I have a high speed internet connection that I do not require a landline
for.
6. 95% of the time, when friends and family visit they have thier own cels
that they use to call people if needed.
7. I can move my home number that everyone already has to the cel.
8. If I really, really needed a landline, I can go to my neighbors.

Duncan
April 20, 2004 2:35:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Duncan703 wrote:

> "Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote in message
> news:c5v385$6cr@library1.airnews.net...
>
>>Duncan703 wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Greetings,
>>>
>>>I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
>>>Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will
>
> be
>
>>>my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:
>
>
>>Are you attempting to go without a landline at your home? If so, I
>>trust you've given due consideration that public wireless voice
>>communications can, at times, be sketchy with regard to reliability
>
> issues.
>
>>Cellular carriers don't operate their service offerings from the same
>>statutory regulations that a landline carrier does.

Okay, let me try to polish my point better... Landline carriers are
obligated to provide dial and 911 service - wireless carriers are under
no such statutory obligation. In fact, wireless carriers aren't even
obligated to provide ANY service to ANY particular area whatsoever. If
they decide to move the cell site serving your area, they'll move that
cell site and there ain't a helluva lot you can say or do about it.
Now, you may be in an urban area with lots of wireless access, either as
a home user or a roamer. OTOH, landline service in rural areas is
sometimes dicey, sometimes dicey enough for some people to want to
depend on that strong wireless signal from just down the road. Until
they move the cell site, then you're SOL. But then again, you're
probably one of those folks that never need to dial 911. No?

Been there.


>
>
> Yes, I am going to be getting rid of my landline phone. Over the last few
> months I've been condsidering this. I've discussed with friends and
> co-workers trying to find a reason not to make this move.
>
> 1. In the area that I live and work, cel phones are as reliable as a land
> line.
> 2. Most of my calling is considered either instate long distance or country
> wide long distance.
> 3. I travel enough in the course of a year that a cel phone would be nice to
> have.
> 4. I cannot find a landline billing deal that would save me more than about
> $5 a month over a cel phone with the same features with my long distance
> calling patterns. And once my travel calling is factored in, the cel is
> cheaper.
> 5. I have a high speed internet connection that I do not require a landline
> for.
> 6. 95% of the time, when friends and family visit they have thier own cels
> that they use to call people if needed.
> 7. I can move my home number that everyone already has to the cel.
> 8. If I really, really needed a landline, I can go to my neighbors.
>
> Duncan
>
>


--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 5:01:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 22:35:11 -0500, Jer <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote:

>Okay, let me try to polish my point better... Landline carriers are
>obligated to provide dial and 911 service - wireless carriers are under
>no such statutory obligation. In fact, wireless carriers aren't even

Wireless carriers in the US are in fact required to provide coverage
to a certain percentage of the geographic area their license for a
given area covers (if an 850 MHz carrier) or a certain percentage of
the population their license for a given area covers (if a 1900 MHz
carrier.)

That said, there are some areas that 850 MHz carriers never built out
that either have coverage from no or only one originally licensed
carrier (e.g. the Copper Basin of TN, which to this day has coverage
only from VZW since USCC never built their license out there), or were
picked up by a different carrier after the original licensee let an
area sit unserved for five years (after that time, an area becomes
"unserved area" that other carriers can apply to serve. One rather
unique carrier, Commnet Wireless, serves areas other carriers never
built out almost exclusively, and only provides wholesale roaming
coverage to customers of other carriers and doesn't sell "local"
service. It's hard to sell local service when you have cell sites in,
say, Tennessee on a switch in Yuma, AZ! ;)  )

There is *no* requirement that carriers have roaming agreements with
other carriers; this creates some situations where there is coverage
but customers of a given carrier can't use it. This is a rather
common problem with Cingular or Dobson customers traveling where the
only coverage is from VZW (Copper Basin again) since Cingular and
Dobson loathe VZW and vice versa.

-SC
--
Stanley Cline -- sc1 at roamer1 dot org -- http://www.roamer1.org/
....
"Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. There might
be a law against it by that time." -/usr/games/fortune
April 20, 2004 5:01:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Stanley Cline wrote:

> On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 22:35:11 -0500, Jer <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote:
>
>
>>Okay, let me try to polish my point better... Landline carriers are
>>obligated to provide dial and 911 service - wireless carriers are under
>>no such statutory obligation. In fact, wireless carriers aren't even
>
>
> Wireless carriers in the US are in fact required to provide coverage
> to a certain percentage of the geographic area their license for a
> given area covers (if an 850 MHz carrier) or a certain percentage of
> the population their license for a given area covers (if a 1900 MHz
> carrier.)

Cover a percentage of users in a geographical area? Sure, most cover
significantly more than that, Cingular does. So, if moving a tower
means they cover even more than they were before moving the tower, it
gets moved. If there's another tower tha "may" cover what was left
behind, then the users in that area will just have to cope. Stuff happens.

So, an even finer point.... No wireless carrier is obligated by statute
to maintain the location of any cell tower. So, if there's only one
tower serving your home, and that's the only tower offering 911 service
to your home wireless.... oops.

>
> That said, there are some areas that 850 MHz carriers never built out
> that either have coverage from no or only one originally licensed
> carrier (e.g. the Copper Basin of TN, which to this day has coverage
> only from VZW since USCC never built their license out there), or were
> picked up by a different carrier after the original licensee let an
> area sit unserved for five years (after that time, an area becomes
> "unserved area" that other carriers can apply to serve. One rather
> unique carrier, Commnet Wireless, serves areas other carriers never
> built out almost exclusively, and only provides wholesale roaming
> coverage to customers of other carriers and doesn't sell "local"
> service. It's hard to sell local service when you have cell sites in,
> say, Tennessee on a switch in Yuma, AZ! ;)  )
>
> There is *no* requirement that carriers have roaming agreements with
> other carriers; this creates some situations where there is coverage
> but customers of a given carrier can't use it. This is a rather
> common problem with Cingular or Dobson customers traveling where the
> only coverage is from VZW (Copper Basin again) since Cingular and
> Dobson loathe VZW and vice versa.


But the 911 regulations say that IF a carrier is going to offer ANY 911
service, they can't just offer it to their own clients, they are
obligated to offer it to all clients, including roamers, and including
handsets that aren't registered with ANY carrier.


--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 20, 2004 5:57:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <i87a80l9gl5grjfsl4odnsmg8kvn80f3ar@4ax.com>,
Stanley Cline <sc1-news@roamer1.org> wrote:

> Wireless carriers in the US are in fact required to provide coverage
> to a certain percentage of the geographic area their license for a
> given area covers (if an 850 MHz carrier) or a certain percentage of
> the population their license for a given area covers (if a 1900 MHz
> carrier.)

His point is that if you get no signal on your cell phone, you get no
911 service. And if the Cell tower was just "retuned" and you now get no
cell signal indoors......
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 2:39:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote :

> But the 911 regulations say that IF a carrier is going to offer ANY 911
> service, they can't just offer it to their own clients, they are
> obligated to offer it to all clients, including roamers, and including
> handsets that aren't registered with ANY carrier.

I could be wrong, but this arguement kinda negates your previous ones. If I
should need to call 911, I know that Verizon offers 911 service in this
area. So even if Cingular decides not to carry 911 (and as a large company
with stockholders and public relations I can't see how they couldn't) I
still have at least one other company to fall back on. And if I'm driving or
otherwise away from home and need to call 911, my landline phone does me no
good at all. With a cel I at least have a chance.

And between being in a large metro area, having a friend test her phone
here, and signing with a growing company, my chances are pretty good that
coverage is not going to disappear. And should the worst case happen that
Cingular goes under with no other company to buy thier customers out, I
change providers and get a new number. If every cel company goes out of
business on me, then i get my landline back.
April 21, 2004 11:56:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Duncan703 wrote:

> "Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote :
>
>
>>But the 911 regulations say that IF a carrier is going to offer ANY 911
>>service, they can't just offer it to their own clients, they are
>>obligated to offer it to all clients, including roamers, and including
>>handsets that aren't registered with ANY carrier.
>
>
> I could be wrong, but this arguement kinda negates your previous ones. If I
> should need to call 911, I know that Verizon offers 911 service in this
> area. So even if Cingular decides not to carry 911 (and as a large company
> with stockholders and public relations I can't see how they couldn't) I
> still have at least one other company to fall back on. And if I'm driving or
> otherwise away from home and need to call 911, my landline phone does me no
> good at all. With a cel I at least have a chance.
>
> And between being in a large metro area, having a friend test her phone
> here, and signing with a growing company, my chances are pretty good that
> coverage is not going to disappear. And should the worst case happen that
> Cingular goes under with no other company to buy thier customers out, I
> change providers and get a new number. If every cel company goes out of
> business on me, then i get my landline back.
>
>


So long as you've covered all the critical issues in your particular
situation, then you should feel confident that you've made the best
decision for you and your family. However, most people that I'm aware
of that have gone totally wireless at their home are rural residents
without a clue. They desparately need a reality check. Their only
consideration was the cost of both services, as if they were browsing
for bottle caps at a local sidewalk sale. These people are perfect
candidates for a Darwin award, and their families were unwittingly
included in their cost-only decision. They actually equated wireline
and wireless services as the same, yet nothing could be further from the
truth.

I sincerely hope you've made the right choice for yourself and those
that depend on your decisions for their life support.

--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 21, 2004 5:38:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <c65qve$ef2@library1.airnews.net>, Jer <gdunn@airmail.ten>
wrote:

> I sincerely hope you've made the right choice for yourself and those
> that depend on your decisions for their life support.

more F.U.D.
Anonymous
April 24, 2004 2:20:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

We are now setting up systems for the mandated wirelss 911 mapping included
in phase III of the 911 mandate. This mandate stipulates the requirement for
wireless carriers to provide both 911 service and location data for our
mapping databases


"Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote in message
news:c65qve$ef2@library1.airnews.net...
> Duncan703 wrote:
>
> > "Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote :
> >
> >
> >>But the 911 regulations say that IF a carrier is going to offer ANY 911
> >>service, they can't just offer it to their own clients, they are
> >>obligated to offer it to all clients, including roamers, and including
> >>handsets that aren't registered with ANY carrier.
> >
> >
> > I could be wrong, but this arguement kinda negates your previous ones.
If I
> > should need to call 911, I know that Verizon offers 911 service in this
> > area. So even if Cingular decides not to carry 911 (and as a large
company
> > with stockholders and public relations I can't see how they couldn't) I
> > still have at least one other company to fall back on. And if I'm
driving or
> > otherwise away from home and need to call 911, my landline phone does me
no
> > good at all. With a cel I at least have a chance.
> >
> > And between being in a large metro area, having a friend test her phone
> > here, and signing with a growing company, my chances are pretty good
that
> > coverage is not going to disappear. And should the worst case happen
that
> > Cingular goes under with no other company to buy thier customers out, I
> > change providers and get a new number. If every cel company goes out of
> > business on me, then i get my landline back.
> >
> >
>
>
> So long as you've covered all the critical issues in your particular
> situation, then you should feel confident that you've made the best
> decision for you and your family. However, most people that I'm aware
> of that have gone totally wireless at their home are rural residents
> without a clue. They desparately need a reality check. Their only
> consideration was the cost of both services, as if they were browsing
> for bottle caps at a local sidewalk sale. These people are perfect
> candidates for a Darwin award, and their families were unwittingly
> included in their cost-only decision. They actually equated wireline
> and wireless services as the same, yet nothing could be further from the
> truth.
>
> I sincerely hope you've made the right choice for yourself and those
> that depend on your decisions for their life support.
>
> --
> jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
> "All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
> what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
>
April 24, 2004 11:15:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

kennmary4 wrote:

> We are now setting up systems for the mandated wirelss 911 mapping included
> in phase III of the 911 mandate. This mandate stipulates the requirement for
> wireless carriers to provide both 911 service and location data for our
> mapping databases
>


Yes, I'm well aware of the mandate, and TP's efforts to finish pasting
everything together. Yup, if a wireless carrier's service is available
at a particular location, and if the PSAP trunks aren't blitzed, 911
ought to work. If the only cell tower you can use is blitzed or removed
from service altogether....


--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 25, 2004 7:45:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote in message
news:c6evsj$pp2@library1.airnews.net...
> kennmary4 wrote:
>
> > We are now setting up systems for the mandated wirelss 911 mapping
included
> > in phase III of the 911 mandate. This mandate stipulates the requirement
for
> > wireless carriers to provide both 911 service and location data for our
> > mapping databases
> >
> Yes, I'm well aware of the mandate, and TP's efforts to finish pasting
> everything together. Yup, if a wireless carrier's service is available
> at a particular location, and if the PSAP trunks aren't blitzed, 911
> ought to work. If the only cell tower you can use is blitzed or removed
> from service altogether....

IF you haven't switched to a cordless phone at home and the power goes out,
IF your landline home box was not shorted by a flood, IF your local phone
box was not hit by lightning, IF the phone switch in the area was not hit by
a car, IF the power or computer system at the 911 office didn't go offline
for some mysterious reason and the backups didn't work, then your landline
911 ought to work, IF you don't get put on hold when you call 911....

We can play the IF game all day long. The facts are that the wireless 911
systems work as well as landline 911 service under normal conditions. In an
area crisis, the 911 service is slammed landline or not. The only overall
advantage to a land 911 call is getting the exact address. But with the
newer phones you have the GPS locator which will help for when you're home
or on the road.
April 26, 2004 2:13:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

Duncan703 wrote:
> "Jer" <gdunn@airmail.ten> wrote in message
> news:c6evsj$pp2@library1.airnews.net...
>
>>kennmary4 wrote:
>>
>>
>>>We are now setting up systems for the mandated wirelss 911 mapping
>
> included
>
>>>in phase III of the 911 mandate. This mandate stipulates the requirement
>
> for
>
>>>wireless carriers to provide both 911 service and location data for our
>>>mapping databases
>>>
>>
>>Yes, I'm well aware of the mandate, and TP's efforts to finish pasting
>>everything together. Yup, if a wireless carrier's service is available
>> at a particular location, and if the PSAP trunks aren't blitzed, 911
>>ought to work. If the only cell tower you can use is blitzed or removed
>>from service altogether....
>
>
> IF you haven't switched to a cordless phone at home and the power goes out,
> IF your landline home box was not shorted by a flood, IF your local phone
> box was not hit by lightning, IF the phone switch in the area was not hit by
> a car, IF the power or computer system at the 911 office didn't go offline
> for some mysterious reason and the backups didn't work, then your landline
> 911 ought to work, IF you don't get put on hold when you call 911....
>
> We can play the IF game all day long. The facts are that the wireless 911
> systems work as well as landline 911 service under normal conditions. In an
> area crisis, the 911 service is slammed landline or not. The only overall
> advantage to a land 911 call is getting the exact address. But with the
> newer phones you have the GPS locator which will help for when you're home
> or on the road.
>
>


Okay, let's play the IF game. My turn... How many moving parts in a
wireline 911 call? How many in a wireless 911 call? Which company has
been in the business of providing 911 service longer? Which company has
been fighting one standard after another since it's inception? Now you
go...

--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 28, 2004 6:56:31 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

and not to mention , now most bid specs call for ability to receive 911
calls made from internet telephony
April 28, 2004 6:56:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

kennmary4 wrote:
> and not to mention , now most bid specs call for ability to receive 911
> calls made from internet telephony
>
>


Now there's a pig in a poke if I ever saw one.

--
jer email reply - I am not a 'ten' ICQ = 35253273
"All that we do is touched with ocean, yet we remain on the shore of
what we know." -- Richard Wilbur
Anonymous
April 28, 2004 5:33:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

"Duncan703" <duncan703@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<rN6dnRPL66GSUR_dRVn-vA@comcast.com>...
> Greetings,
>
> I'm going to be switching my home phone number (Verizon) to a wireless.
> Right now, after all the research I've done it looks like Cingular will be
> my carrier. I do have a few questions before I do this though:
>
> 1. Are there any gotchas in moving the number that I should be aware of,
> other than perhaps it taking a few days?
>
> 2. For the phone itself the V400 seems to be the best choice at the moment.
> Taking away the camera feature, is there a better phone to choose right now?
> I have the V400 and I'll tell you this much, the battery drains quickly so if you drive a lot, be sure to get a car charger, also the volume for the ear piece is not very loud, you may have trouble hearing a caller if you are in a noisy eniroment, and the pictures from the camera tend to be blurry.

> 3. I've read a few posts here about a V600. Anyone know the relase
> date/price point on that? Would it be worth it to wait?
>
I think it will be worth the wait, maybe it will have what the v400
lacks, a higher volume setting for the earpiece.
> 4. On the GSM coverage map all the areas that I travel to (major cities) are
> covered. My question is how accurate do people find the coverage map?
> The GSM coverage map is not accurate at all as far as I'm concerned.
>
5. How easy is it with Cingular to add extra services or take them
off as I
> find I use or not use certian things?
>
> 6. Should I go to a Cingular store or Best Buy to get set up?
> Try online first.

> Comments on any or all of these questions would be appreciated. Also I
> didn't come accross a FAQ for this group so if there is one and this stuff
> is addressed, I appoligize.

Be sure to make sure the GSM service is what you want. I am trying
out VZW right now and so far their service exceeds Cingulars GSM in my
area. Just be sure to try out the phone extensively during your 15
day trial.
>
> Duncan
Anonymous
April 29, 2004 3:19:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

> Be sure to make sure the GSM service is what you want. I am trying
> out VZW right now and so far their service exceeds Cingulars GSM in my
> area. Just be sure to try out the phone extensively during your 15
> day trial.
> >
> > Duncan

You must not live in Maryland or anywhere near New England then. -Dave
!