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Large AMD Socket A Cooler Roundup!

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March 11, 2003 3:09:26 AM

(includes the spire falconrock2 and a gold plated heatsink LOL)

<A HREF="http://www.digit-life.com/articles2/cooling-systems/soc..." target="_new">http://www.digit-life.com/articles2/cooling-systems/soc...;/A>

<b><i>Poloticians and Nappies should be changed often... For much the same reason.</b></i>
March 11, 2003 8:14:30 PM

Thanks man!!!

The Glacial Tech Igloo 2500 looks like just what I want, not too big (hopefully not to heavy) and quiet. Plus, I can get it for $15 USD (shipping included).

For my main machine the downside is there aren't that many choices for optional 70 mm fans. Then again, my YS Tech fan might work well if I use fan control. I'll need a switch. I'd want the choice between about 70% speed and full speed.

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
March 11, 2003 8:51:55 PM

A dual speed fan is easy...

Put a 20ohm 1 watt resistor in series with the power lead of the fan (red wire) and then hook a toggle switch across the resistor so it shorts the resistor when turned on. With appropriate wire lenght you can mount the switch in an unused drive bay cover or bring it out the back... whatever.

Switch off, low speed,
switch on, high speed.



--->It ain't better if it don't work<---
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March 11, 2003 9:15:16 PM

if you need fan speed reduction, use a switch, rheostat unit or the 7v mod :) 

<b><i>Poloticians and Nappies should be changed often... For much the same reason.</b></i>
March 12, 2003 12:33:33 AM

I've seen the simple slowdown mod you posted. If I wanted to combine that circuit plus the option of a full speed fan could I use a double pole, double throw switch, one circuit with the slowdown mod the other straight thru? One size capacitor would I use with a 20 ohm resistor?

Thanks Teq.

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
March 12, 2003 2:09:55 AM

You can do it that way but you don't need a DPDT switch. You can just short out the resistor with an SPST switch. Strictly speaking the Capacitor isn't necessary, it's only there to be sure balky fans start reliably. Almost any fan will start every time with a 10 or 20 ohm resistor... so it's not a problem.



<pre>Here's the schematic: (please forgive the graphics quality)
.
.

/
____/ ____ Switch
| |
From mb --------| |------------ to Fan
| _____ |
|--|_____|--| Resistor
.
.

Closing the switch, shorts the resistor giving you full speed

</pre><p>
To make this easy:

You can use any old mini toggle switch you have laying around.

Mount the switch in a convenient spot, preferably in plastic to prevent grounding or shorting. (I'd drill a hole in an old drive cover to mount the switch for each fan you modify and put it in the bottom drive bay...)

For an average fan, the resistor should be in the 10 to 20 ohm range. 5 watt resistors are recommended to protect against burnouts.

Solder the resistor directly across the switch contacts. That way you only need to get the red wire to the switch.

Cut your fan's red wire and splice in a length of two conductor wire long enough to reach your switch, solder one wire to each end of the cut red wire and tape. (22ga or 24ga speaker wire will work fine.)

At the switch end, solder one wire to each side of the resistor, polarity doesn't matter.

Instant two speed fan.

Switch on == noisey/fast/annoying/cool
Switch off == quiet/slow/tolerable/warm

Easy stuff.



--->It ain't better if it don't work<---
March 12, 2003 2:35:34 AM

actually its the yellow wire that its connected too :wink:
yellow = 12v, red = 5v.
I should know... i spend the better part of 2 days playing around with rewiring them :) 

<b><i>Poloticians and Nappies should be changed often... For much the same reason.</b></i>
March 12, 2003 2:49:56 AM

I'm talking about the red wire connected to the fan between the plug and motor... (Hold a disconnected fan in your hand... see the red wire?)


For a standard 3 wire fan...

Red == power +12vdc

Black == ground

Yellow == tachometer

Each fan must be modified individually. You want the resistor in the fan's red power lead, dropping the fan's working voltage to about 9 or 10 volts. This will still allow you to connect the fan to your motherboard and the tachometer will still work.

Absolutely do not put resistors in the yellow wire. The tachometer is an output signal from the fan. Putting the resistor in the yellow (tachometer) wire will not slow down the fan, it will simply produce a false tachometer reading and might damage the fan.

And, whatever else you do... do not combine this mod with that screwball 7volt trick where you ground the fan to the +5 volt line...



--->It ain't better if it don't work<---
March 12, 2003 2:59:02 AM

Oh whoops :) 
I thought we were talkin about molex connections, not the 3 pin mobo connections.

That will teach me to read huh?

<b><i>Poloticians and Nappies should be changed often... For much the same reason.</b></i>
March 12, 2003 3:06:50 AM

No problem... It's an easy mistake.

In either case (molex or mini 3pin) you still want the red wire leading to the fan motor.

If we could post small gifs, I'd put up a photo, but we can't, so I don't... :frown:

--->It ain't better if it don't work<---
March 12, 2003 3:23:27 AM

Maybe I'm over anticipating problems. The fan I want to slow is the YS Tech TMD Fan (36 CFM). I was told that this fan can draw as much as 0.8 Amp at spin-up. (For this reason I don't plug it into my motherboard header).

Will I have problems with the simple circuit?

Thanks for the diagram. I understood what you meant but pictures never hurt.

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
March 12, 2003 3:39:47 AM

If you use a 5 watt resistor you'll be fine.

As a bonus, the resistor will limit that startup surge somewhat...



--->It ain't better if it don't work<---
March 12, 2003 5:17:22 PM

...only 280 grams

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
March 12, 2003 5:23:52 PM

Great!

Thanks!

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
!