Which DSL Package?

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number

Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with free
activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
activation and modem.

I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have had
very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.

Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth the
19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
video clips and live camera chat?

Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?

Thanks!
15 answers Last reply
More about which package
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    "Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2wefe.8772$GQ5.804@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >
    > Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    > least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    >
    > Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with
    free
    > activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    > activation and modem.
    >
    > I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have
    had
    > very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
    > anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    >
    > Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth
    the
    > 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    > video clips and live camera chat?
    >
    > Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    > reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    >
    > Thanks!


    Also, will I be able to use any home page I want? I currently don't use
    any Earthlink software. I only use their dial up number and e-mail address.
    I just use Internet Explorer with Google as my home page. Can I continue
    doing this? Also, I have a lot of links on my desktop to webpages. I just
    click a link on my desktop and Internet Explorer opens up and goes to that
    page. Could I still continue doing that?

    Finally, I currently have a second phone line for my dial up. Could I
    get rid of this phone line and use the main talking line number? If so, my
    computer sits in a corner of the living room. The main talking phone line
    is across the room. Would it be safe to run a cable all across the room to
    the main phone hookup?

    Thanks!
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    "Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:2wefe.8772$GQ5.804@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    >
    > Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    > least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    >
    > Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with
    free
    > activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    > activation and modem.
    >
    > I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have
    had
    > very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
    > anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    >
    > Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth
    the
    > 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    > video clips and live camera chat?
    >
    > Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    > reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    >
    > Thanks!


    I just called SBC. Only the 1.5 Mbps is available. So, how much faster
    is 1.5Mbps compared to regular dial-up?
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    On Sun, 08 May 2005 02:31:37 GMT, "Von Fourche"
    <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:


    > I just called SBC. Only the 1.5 Mbps is available. So, how much faster
    >is 1.5Mbps compared to regular dial-up?

    The actual speed you get is likely to be limited by the server
    you connect to. The only time you are likely to see the full
    1.5 Mbps is when downloading a big file from a lightly-loaded
    FTP site.

    Yes, you can use one phone line for DSL and voice service.
    Bear in mind that a DSL connection is always on, so whenever
    your computer is on, it is subject to various attacks. Get a
    gateway router from Linksys or D-Link, get a copy of ZoneAlarm
    and use it instead of the weak Windows XP firewall, and get a
    better browser than Internet Exploiter. The Mozilla suite is
    free, combines browser, email client and newsreader, and isn't
    as malware-friendly as MSIE. I use Opera for browsing and mail
    and read Usenet with Free Agent.

    The best defense against many attacks is to break out of Windows
    entirely. Once you get your DSL line working, you can download
    Knoppix from www.distrowatch.com and burn it to a CD. A 600
    megabyte file is big, even for DSL, but you can start the
    download and go to lunch. This CD will boot into a running
    Linux system without installing _anything_ to your hard disk.

    The K Desktop Environment feels a lot like Windows, except for
    the single-clicl-to-launch convention. Opera and Firefox under
    Linux look just like they do under Windows. Open Office
    (included with Knoppix and most other Linux distributions) does
    what Microsoft Office does, including reading and writing MS
    Office file formats, and is free. If you don't like what you
    see, remove the CD and reboot and you're back in Windows.

    You can have it both ways. My Presario R3010 laptop dual-boots
    Ubuntu Linux and Windows XP. The boot menu was installed by the
    Ubuntu installer, which includes a partition resizing tool that
    can safely shrink the Windows partition without losing anything.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    1500kbps / 50kbps = 30 times faster -- in theory

    Reality might be less, but you'll go from agonizing to really using the web.

    Tom
    "Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:dSefe.8782$GQ5.2325@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >
    > "Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:2wefe.8772$GQ5.804@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >>
    >>
    >> Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    >> least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    >>
    >> Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with
    > free
    >> activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    >> activation and modem.
    >>
    >> I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have
    > had
    >> very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
    >> anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    >>
    >> Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth
    > the
    >> 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    >> video clips and live camera chat?
    >>
    >> Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    >> reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >
    >
    >
    > I just called SBC. Only the 1.5 Mbps is available. So, how much
    > faster
    > is 1.5Mbps compared to regular dial-up?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    Go for it. 1.5Mbps is lightning fast compared to dialup. Use any home page you
    want. Connect up one or more computers via Ethernet, i.e. do not use a USB port
    to connect to the DSL modem... Ben Myers


    On Sun, 08 May 2005 02:31:37 GMT, "Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    >"Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:2wefe.8772$GQ5.804@newsread1.news.pas.earthlink.net...
    >>
    >>
    >> Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    >> least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    >>
    >> Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with
    >free
    >> activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    >> activation and modem.
    >>
    >> I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have
    >had
    >> very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
    >> anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    >>
    >> Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth
    >the
    >> 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    >> video clips and live camera chat?
    >>
    >> Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    >> reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >
    >
    >
    > I just called SBC. Only the 1.5 Mbps is available. So, how much faster
    >is 1.5Mbps compared to regular dial-up?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    Von Fourche wrote:
    > Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    > least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    >
    > Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with free
    > activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    > activation and modem.
    >
    > I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have had
    > very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
    > anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    >
    > Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth the
    > 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    > video clips and live camera chat?
    >
    > Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    > reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    >
    To all who have knowledge about the following:

    Once you change to DSL, do you still need to pay for an ISP such as
    Earthlink?

    What is SBC Yahoo DSL? Does it take the place of Earthlink? Is there
    a charge for it?

    From the comments of others about DSL always being on, and the need for
    a "gateway router from Linksys or D-Link," how much would such a router
    cost?

    I guess my questions are just what does DSL replace if anything (except
    dial up phone service), and what additional expenses would one incur?
    Before I would pay more for Internet access, I would like to know
    exactly what it would cost and how it would work. Thanks.

    Ken
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    See Embeded reply.

    KC

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "Ken" <user@domain.invalid>
    Newsgroups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq
    Sent: Sunday, May 08, 2005 8:06 AM
    Subject: Re: Which DSL Package?


    > Von Fourche wrote:
    > > Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    > > least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    > >
    > > Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with
    free
    > > activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    > > activation and modem.
    > >
    > > I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have
    had
    > > very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them
    to
    > > anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    > >
    > > Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth
    the
    > > 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    > > video clips and live camera chat?
    > >
    > > Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    > > reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    > >
    > > Thanks!
    > >
    > >
    > To all who have knowledge about the following:
    >
    > Once you change to DSL, do you still need to pay for an ISP such as
    > Earthlink?

    They (SBC) are your ISP. Yahoo handles it for them as far as web
    content, Email and Usnenet.

    > What is SBC Yahoo DSL? Does it take the place of Earthlink? Is there
    > a charge for it?

    It is a full Digital Subscriber Line from the provider to your location.
    It can be used to replace your existing service provider or it can be used
    in conjunction with their services. Various main stream ISPs (Earthlink,
    MSN, etc.) have entered into joint ventures with broadband providers (DSL,
    Cable, Satelite, etc.). Prices vary from provider to provider and in
    accordance with the bandwidth provided.

    > From the comments of others about DSL always being on, and the need for
    > a "gateway router from Linksys or D-Link," how much would such a router
    > cost?

    Generally a decent router runs under $100.00 (US). The trade off is you
    can connect multiple computers (CAT 5 and/or WiFi). Connection time is
    zero, as soon as you machine finishes booting your able to go online. Some
    folks boot to an active desktop with live links updated at boot.

    > I guess my questions are just what does DSL replace if anything (except
    > dial up phone service), and what additional expenses would one incur?
    > Before I would pay more for Internet access, I would like to know
    > exactly what it would cost and how it would work. Thanks.

    It's all really about speed and accessability. By not having to convert
    digital signals to analog and push them down a standard telephone wire, you
    can get data from the server to your home much faster. As long as you have
    at least a PII or faster PC your computer can handle the data recieved and
    display it in near real time. You can watch streaming video, live webcast,
    etc. as opposed to downloading content before you can watch it in a smooth
    and undelayed manner. As has been mentioned else where in this thread,
    large files downloaded via dial-up, you start the download, and then gone to
    lunch. With a broadband connection the same file can be downloaded in less
    time than it take to get a fresh cup of coffee. The added cost are as
    stated above, and vary from location to location as far as the service cost
    go. Shop around and you can get a router pretty cheap. Also see what you
    potential future provider offers as some have offered discout prices on
    routers or on tourer/modems (Actually only dial-up uses modems
    (MOdulate/DEModulate) broadband uses terminal devices.)
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    <steverush1@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:p18r711vj0nem0f3g3ep5il461m5k83lb1@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 08 May 2005 02:31:37 GMT, "Von Fourche"
    > <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > I just called SBC. Only the 1.5 Mbps is available. So, how much
    faster
    > >is 1.5Mbps compared to regular dial-up?
    >
    > The actual speed you get is likely to be limited by the server
    > you connect to. The only time you are likely to see the full
    > 1.5 Mbps is when downloading a big file from a lightly-loaded
    > FTP site.
    >
    > Yes, you can use one phone line for DSL and voice service.
    > Bear in mind that a DSL connection is always on, so whenever
    > your computer is on, it is subject to various attacks. Get a
    > gateway router from Linksys or D-Link, get a copy of ZoneAlarm
    > and use it instead of the weak Windows XP firewall, and get a
    > better browser than Internet Exploiter. The Mozilla suite is
    > free, combines browser, email client and newsreader, and isn't
    > as malware-friendly as MSIE. I use Opera for browsing and mail
    > and read Usenet with Free Agent.


    I think I'm going to give a call to SBC Monday and sign up. I also
    think I should be able to save some money. I have a separate phone line in
    the house in the corner of the living room for the dial-up. I will call and
    switch that phone line number to the regular phone line number. Then I will
    have only one phone number coming into the house so I will only have to pay
    for that number. Then sign up for the DSL package.

    The DSL runs over the phone line? A person talking on the phone will
    not hear the DSL data, right? Do people ever hear the DSL data while on the
    phone? Are problems common?

    Also, you need an Ethernet card. My computer is about five years old
    now. It did come with a
    10/100Mb PCI NIC. Is that an Ethernet card? I've never used it. Will it
    work even tho I have never used it since I got the computer five years ago?
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    On Sun, 08 May 2005 18:51:45 GMT, "Von Fourche"
    <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > I think I'm going to give a call to SBC Monday and sign up. I also
    >think I should be able to save some money. I have a separate phone line in
    >the house in the corner of the living room for the dial-up. I will call and
    >switch that phone line number to the regular phone line number. Then I will
    >have only one phone number coming into the house so I will only have to pay
    >for that number. Then sign up for the DSL package.
    >
    > The DSL runs over the phone line? A person talking on the phone will
    >not hear the DSL data, right? Do people ever hear the DSL data while on the
    >phone? Are problems common?
    >
    > Also, you need an Ethernet card. My computer is about five years old
    >now. It did come with a
    >10/100Mb PCI NIC. Is that an Ethernet card? I've never used it. Will it
    >work even tho I have never used it since I got the computer five years ago?

    Any network interface labeled as "10/100 Mbps" is the sort of
    Ethernet card that your DSL modem expects. The jack looks like
    an oversized version of the RJ-11 telephone jack. The modem
    installation kit may include both Ethernet and USB cables. Use
    Ethernet. Connecting a broadband modem through the USB requires
    another layer of software that's something else to go wrong.

    The DSL signal occupies a wide band of frequencies above the
    voice range. To make sure that you don't hear interference in
    phone calls, you plug a little filter between the line and each
    telephone. The modem installation kit will include at least
    one, and you can get more at places like Radio Shack.

    Two non-obvious things about broadband:

    When you establish your account password, write it down and lock
    it up somewhere where you won't forget where you put it. With
    an always-on broadband account, you don't enter your password
    unless service is interrupted. By then, you will have forgotten
    it.

    While you are downloading a big file, you can continue surfing
    the Web. Each page you jump to steals a only few hundred
    miliseconds from the download. You can even start two big
    downloads at once. They will share the available bandwidth, so
    the total time won't be any longer than if you'd run them
    sequentially. The total time might even be shorter, if both
    servers are too slow to use all of your DSL bandwidth. As I
    mentioned, I regularly download Linux distributions that fill an
    entire CD-ROM. Sometimes it takes 30 minutes, but I can read my
    email or newsgroups while I'm waiting, and the Internet protocol
    stack will take care of routing the various data packets to
    their proper destinations in my system.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    DSL and voice share the same line, and, when set up properly, one does not
    interfere with the other.

    The 10/100 Ethernet NIC is just what you need. As long as the drivers are
    installed for it, it should work right away.

    I've worked with DSL self-install kit which includes the DSL modem, filters for
    the voice phones, and a CD which you run in your computer. Pretty easy.

    Your costs should be almost the same, with the elimination of one phone line.

    I endorse the recommendations in another posting:
    Linksys router
    ZoneAlarm firewall (disable the brain-damaged Windows firewall)
    any browser other than Internet Explorer
    any email instead of Outlook or Outlook Express

    .... Ben Myers

    On Sun, 08 May 2005 18:51:45 GMT, "Von Fourche" <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    ><steverush1@cox.net> wrote in message
    >news:p18r711vj0nem0f3g3ep5il461m5k83lb1@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 08 May 2005 02:31:37 GMT, "Von Fourche"
    >> <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> > I just called SBC. Only the 1.5 Mbps is available. So, how much
    >faster
    >> >is 1.5Mbps compared to regular dial-up?
    >>
    >> The actual speed you get is likely to be limited by the server
    >> you connect to. The only time you are likely to see the full
    >> 1.5 Mbps is when downloading a big file from a lightly-loaded
    >> FTP site.
    >>
    >> Yes, you can use one phone line for DSL and voice service.
    >> Bear in mind that a DSL connection is always on, so whenever
    >> your computer is on, it is subject to various attacks. Get a
    >> gateway router from Linksys or D-Link, get a copy of ZoneAlarm
    >> and use it instead of the weak Windows XP firewall, and get a
    >> better browser than Internet Exploiter. The Mozilla suite is
    >> free, combines browser, email client and newsreader, and isn't
    >> as malware-friendly as MSIE. I use Opera for browsing and mail
    >> and read Usenet with Free Agent.
    >
    >
    > I think I'm going to give a call to SBC Monday and sign up. I also
    >think I should be able to save some money. I have a separate phone line in
    >the house in the corner of the living room for the dial-up. I will call and
    >switch that phone line number to the regular phone line number. Then I will
    >have only one phone number coming into the house so I will only have to pay
    >for that number. Then sign up for the DSL package.
    >
    > The DSL runs over the phone line? A person talking on the phone will
    >not hear the DSL data, right? Do people ever hear the DSL data while on the
    >phone? Are problems common?
    >
    > Also, you need an Ethernet card. My computer is about five years old
    >now. It did come with a
    >10/100Mb PCI NIC. Is that an Ethernet card? I've never used it. Will it
    >work even tho I have never used it since I got the computer five years ago?
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    On Sun, 08 May 2005 13:06:41 GMT, Ken <user@domain.invalid> wrote:
    > Von Fourche wrote:
    >> Finally my local phone company (SBC) if offering DSL in my area. At
    >> least that's what their web site says when I punch in my phone number
    >>
    >> Ok, they offer two packages - one is $19.95 and up to 1.5Mbps with free
    >> activation and modem. The other is 29.99 and up to 3.0Mbps with free
    >> activation and modem.
    >>
    >> I am currently using Earthlink dial-up paying 21.95 a month. I have had
    >> very very few problems with Earthlink dial-up and would recommend them to
    >> anyone. But I desperately what to jump on the broad band bandwagon.
    >>
    >> Ok, so how fast is 1.5 Mbps and how fast is 3.0Mbps? Are they worth the
    >> 19.95 and 29.99 respectively? How would they both do with watching live
    >> video clips and live camera chat?
    >>
    >> Also, what's the word on SBC Yahoo DSL? Do they have a decent
    >> reputation? What kind of costumer support am I likely to get from them?
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >>
    > To all who have knowledge about the following:
    >
    > Once you change to DSL, do you still need to pay for an ISP such as
    > Earthlink?

    To me ISP (Internet Service Provider) is who connects you to the internet.
    Some people seem to use the term ISP as to who you use for mail, news,
    etc., but whether you use those from your ISP or elsewhere (like
    Earthlink) does not matter. Dialup is included, so you do not really need
    another dialup ISP, for nationwide travel (you can have 1 DSL and 1 dialup
    connection simultaniously).

    > What is SBC Yahoo DSL? Does it take the place of Earthlink? Is there
    > a charge for it?

    It includes everything you need, DSL, dialup, e-mail, news, web portal,
    etc. You can use your own e-mail program (smtp/pop3) or web mail. You do
    not need to keep Earthlink unless you need time to notify others of your
    new e-mail address or like their newsgroups better. Note that if you have
    any trouble sending Earthlink e-mail when connected through SBC Yahoo DSL,
    you can either send through SBC's mail relay (which should work with SBC
    auth credentials and Earthlink from address), or request that port 25 be
    unblocked if you cannot reach Earthlink's outgoing relay.

    > From the comments of others about DSL always being on, and the need for
    > a "gateway router from Linksys or D-Link," how much would such a router
    > cost?

    Sometimes there are special deals or rebates on broadband routers for
    $20-40. If you only have 1 computer, the modem/router acts as a NAT
    router by default, but it only gives out 1 private IP. So you don't need
    a router unless you have more than 1 PC. If you want to, the modem can be
    reconfigured to let your router do the PPPoE.

    > I guess my questions are just what does DSL replace if anything (except
    > dial up phone service), and what additional expenses would one incur?
    > Before I would pay more for Internet access, I would like to know
    > exactly what it would cost and how it would work. Thanks.

    It provides everything you need 25-30 times faster than most dialup ISP's.
    And with 1 year contract it is currently lower cost than most dialups.
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    "David Efflandt" <efflandt@xnet.com> wrote in message
    news:slrnd7t7h0.h4a.efflandt@typhoon.xnet.com...
    > On Sun, 08 May 2005 13:06:41 GMT, Ken <user@domain.invalid> wrote:

    > It includes everything you need, DSL, dialup, e-mail, news, web portal,
    > etc. You can use your own e-mail program (smtp/pop3) or web mail. You do
    > not need to keep Earthlink unless you need time to notify others of your
    > new e-mail address or like their newsgroups better. Note that if you have
    > any trouble sending Earthlink e-mail when connected through SBC Yahoo DSL,
    > you can either send through SBC's mail relay (which should work with SBC
    > auth credentials and Earthlink from address), or request that port 25 be
    > unblocked if you cannot reach Earthlink's outgoing relay.


    What do you mean "it includes everything you need, DSL, dialup,?" Are
    you saying if I sign up for the $19.95 DSL plan they will give me dial-up
    too?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    <steverush1@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:318t71t15v7v3gbekkectprimig66irqsp@4ax.com...

    > The DSL signal occupies a wide band of frequencies above the
    > voice range. To make sure that you don't hear interference in
    > phone calls, you plug a little filter between the line and each
    > telephone. The modem installation kit will include at least
    > one, and you can get more at places like Radio Shack.


    Each phone? So, If I have one phone in the kitchen, one in the livign
    room, and the other dial-up phone jack without a phone, and hook DSL up to
    the dial-up jack without a phone, then I will have to put filters on both
    the two phones?
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    On Mon, 09 May 2005 01:04:44 GMT, "Von Fourche"
    <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >
    ><steverush1@cox.net> wrote in message
    >news:318t71t15v7v3gbekkectprimig66irqsp@4ax.com...
    >
    >> The DSL signal occupies a wide band of frequencies above the
    >> voice range. To make sure that you don't hear interference in
    >> phone calls, you plug a little filter between the line and each
    >> telephone. The modem installation kit will include at least
    >> one, and you can get more at places like Radio Shack.
    >
    >
    > Each phone? So, If I have one phone in the kitchen, one in the livign
    >room, and the other dial-up phone jack without a phone, and hook DSL up to
    >the dial-up jack without a phone, then I will have to put filters on both
    >the two phones?

    It's possible to wire a filter between the line and most of the
    house, with the DSL jack on the line side of the filter, but
    it's usually easier to just put one on each phone. The filter
    is a little widget with a plug and cable on one end and a jack
    on the other.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.compaq (More info?)

    <steverush1@cox.net> wrote in message
    news:6dft711pmuvqib5al08l3jkfbptsune086@4ax.com...
    > On Mon, 09 May 2005 01:04:44 GMT, "Von Fourche"
    > <monaco6178@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > ><steverush1@cox.net> wrote in message
    > >news:318t71t15v7v3gbekkectprimig66irqsp@4ax.com...
    > >
    > >> The DSL signal occupies a wide band of frequencies above the
    > >> voice range. To make sure that you don't hear interference in
    > >> phone calls, you plug a little filter between the line and each
    > >> telephone. The modem installation kit will include at least
    > >> one, and you can get more at places like Radio Shack.
    > >
    > >
    > > Each phone? So, If I have one phone in the kitchen, one in the
    livign
    > >room, and the other dial-up phone jack without a phone, and hook DSL up
    to
    > >the dial-up jack without a phone, then I will have to put filters on both
    > >the two phones?
    >
    > It's possible to wire a filter between the line and most of the
    > house, with the DSL jack on the line side of the filter, but
    > it's usually easier to just put one on each phone. The filter
    > is a little widget with a plug and cable on one end and a jack
    > on the other.


    Well, I just called my dial-up provider Earthlink. They said I could
    get DSL from them. They want $19.95 for the first six months then $39.95
    after that. I think the speeds would be the same between Earthlink and SBC.
    The woman I talked to at Earthlink was in America and American. The guy I
    talked to at SBC Yahoo was named Felipe or Pedro or something. I've been
    reading a lot of bad things about SBC Yahoo customer support.

    The lady mentioned the download speed could be up to 1.5 megs. I asked
    her if I would actually be using the SBC DSL lines and just be paying
    Earthlink. She mentioned since they are the only phone company offering DSL
    I might be using the SBC lines for DSL. But she said all equipment comes
    from Earthlink.

    So, what do I do? Do I go with my phone company DSL (SBC Yahoo) and pay
    $19.00 a month or do I go with my current my current dial-up provider
    (Earthlink) and pay $19.00 then $39.00 after six months?

    My gut tells me to go with Earthlink. I have had no problems with them.
    I've only called them a few times since I've had them and customer support
    has always been nice and good. The lady I talked to was in America. I
    asked if Earthlink DSL customer support was in the U.S. She said they do
    have centers in the U.S., like New Mexico, and they also have out of country
    call centers. Ok, she was honest. But do I want to pay $40.00 a month for
    it when I can pay $19.95 for the first year?
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