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Anyone ever use this ?

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  • Heatsinks
  • Overclocking
Last response: in Overclocking
March 31, 2003 7:01:41 PM

<A HREF="http://sonicparts.com/en-us/dept_218.html" target="_new">http://sonicparts.com/en-us/dept_218.html&lt;/A> ?? looks interesting.. but rather expensive

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March 31, 2003 7:28:03 PM

I haven't used/tested one... but look at the design... that thing's gonna be heavy and the fan is crunched right up against the water pump. I can't see how it would do a good job.

Strikes me as nothing but a really nifty way of separating you from your money.

Stick with a good quality hybrid aircooler... copper bottom, aluminum fins, fan on top... you'll do fine.


--->It ain't better if it don't work<---
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April 1, 2003 12:30:53 AM

Dans data reviewed someting almost identical. nd it sucks. I dont know how they can claim its "amazing" dan showed that any half decent aircooler could do better. AVOID IT.

<b>Damn War! I'm too young to watch other people die!</b>
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April 1, 2003 4:28:15 AM

wow, how did the manufacturer manage a .18 thermal resistance????
April 1, 2003 6:41:11 AM

with a lot of creative writting

<b>people are only idiots when they don't realize - when they do it just gets funnier, like a dog chasing its own tail, or like george bush's public address(es)</b>
April 3, 2003 12:56:34 AM

maybe if the heat output is very low they could get that... just look at it...heat has to get out, its that simple. the copper cooler bit is still very small, with low contact with the water pipes. also the airflow is limited with a titchy 60mm fan... a fan that will have great trouble drawing any air due to its location. very bad design.

<b>Damn War! I'm too young to watch other people die!</b>
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April 4, 2003 4:50:16 AM

It could be doomed to catastrophic failure.

If that weak pump fails what happens?

If it acts like a water cooler where the pump failed well that would be bad.

On the other hand, it might act like a heatpipe and not kill the CPU, just run hotter.

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
April 4, 2003 5:34:51 AM

doubtful... heatpipes use phase change fluids... the thermal transport effects of water while stationary isnt good enough, though you may get a useful minute of cpu time as the water heats up to lockup temp.

<b>Damn War! I'm too young to watch other people die!</b>
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April 4, 2003 2:07:41 PM

Thinking about this cooler has gotten me to one thought. Isnt the idea of a water cooling rig to take the tempuature of the cpu as far away quickly, so it has somewhere to radiate? Even if you had a copper insert on the bottom of this thing, I think it would still be more efficiant to have a solid metal heatsink there. This thing just introduces another thermal barrier.

<font color=red>*</font color=red><font color=white>*</font color=white><font color=blue>*</font color=blue>
... And I'm proud to be an American, where at least I know I'm free, and I won't forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.
April 4, 2003 2:17:50 PM

hmmm, thinking, thinking - what about using a phase change liquid in a true watercooling setup?

<b>people are only idiots when they don't realize - when they do it just gets funnier, like a dog chasing its own tail, or like george bush's public address(es)</b>
April 4, 2003 8:49:58 PM

I looked at from the another point of view. Comparing it to a conventional water cooling rig, you have a low flow pump, small radiator, low cfm fan. How well could it work? Not very well at all!

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
April 4, 2003 8:54:46 PM

I've seen DIY heatpipe projects that use just water. Never could figure out how they actually worked since presumably you don't want the core to get hot enough to boil the water.

Anyone know what the mini Shuttle PC's use in their heatpipes?

<b>99% is great, unless you are talking about system stability</b>
April 4, 2003 11:51:12 PM

well i know a few months back some group of people were working on micro heatpipes only a couple of mm in diameter. if they ever come to commercial fruition i can see a heatsink being a big copper block with hundreds of tiny heatpipes in it... lookin much like the mcx-462.

<b>Damn War! I'm too young to watch other people die!</b>
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April 5, 2003 2:49:47 AM

Seems to be the common view here lol

<font color=red>*</font color=red><font color=white>*</font color=white><font color=blue>*</font color=blue>
... And I'm proud to be an American, where at least I know I'm free, and I won't forget the men who died, who gave that right to me.
April 5, 2003 8:16:34 PM

yeah i remember that - what ever happened to it though, I mean i know there were issues with costs but nonetheless, it would be a viable solution and definitely be welcomed onto the market (obviously unless it was sh!t)

<b>people are only idiots when they don't realize - when they do it just gets funnier, like a dog chasing its own tail, or like george bush's public address(es)</b>
April 7, 2003 12:52:00 PM

If you break this this up a little -

mini pump and heatsink/water block on the CPU then have two pipes going out of it to a mini radiator attached to a fan/fans placed in one of the exhaust fan 'bays'

- although not as mightly as some of the h20 cooling kits out there might be interesting.