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What does work with Mac OS X?

I have a few question about the OS from apple (OS X).

1. If I were to purchase an empty hard drive, where could I get a legit/legal copy of OS X Lion 10.7 to install on the new drive.

2. Not sure if any really know, but how well does OS X Lion work with programs/software. Like would a game such as BF3 work on it? And could I install steam to download all my games?

As you can see, I am a pure Windows person, and really don't understand different operating systems.

Thanks for the help!
23 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about what work
  1. Best answer
    Most PC games don't work with Mac OS X. Steam is available, but most new shooters like BF3 aren't available. You could get Call of Duty : Modern Warfare 4 which is over 4 years old.

    The standard web browsers are available for download firefox, chrome, opera ...
    You can get Microsoft Office for productivity.
    Adobe's design products are also available.

    For intensive gaming, Mac OS X is not what you want. (unless intense gaming is playing farmville for days).

    As for your first question, sorry I don't know.
  2. Okay thanks, that is what I wanted to know.
  3. Best answer selected by RockNRollz.
  4. Wait, Mac OS X can only legally be operated on a Mac....period. If your intention is to make a Hackintosh, you are on the wrong forum and discussions of this nature are not allowed on Tom's Forums.
  5. Col, we are technically allowed to discuss hackintoshes. Technically... read the sticky on hackintoshes.

    I don't like that policy, but it's what the legal team say is ok.
  6. amdfangirl said:
    Col, we are technically allowed to discuss hackintoshes. Technically... read the sticky on hackintoshes.

    I don't like that policy, but it's what the legal team say is ok.

    Knowing a little (well a lot actually) about IP Rights and Software Licensing. Using OS X on any other platform, other than an Apple computer is absolutely forbidden by the OS X license. I am not sure who at Tom's reviewed this license, but by allowing discussions on OSX86 Tom's is supporting software piracy. The goofy part of "at least buy a legit copy" is bogus and would certainly not hold up in court. Just ask that Mac clone vendors who were all sued into the dark ages...

    Is this the stance this site wants to take? I STRONGLY recommend this policy be re-looked, else we might as well open Pandora's Box and begin to talk about bypassing all security features and how to hack commercial software for personal use without paying for it. See what I mean?
  7. I campaigned against this decision. However, I only moderate things, not set policy.

    PM jpishgar if you want something changed. You have my full support on this issue.
  8. Tom's Hardware is an international site. It has been determined that restrictive EULAs are not legally binding in many jurisdictions. To ban discussion of subjects that are illegal in some particular countries would greatly limit what could be discussed. In any case, this is a question of contract law, not criminal law.

    But, in answer to the OP, creating a Hackintosh - particularly running Lion - is not a trivial concern; if you have enough knowledge to be successful you probably don't have to ask. But, if you really want to try, Apple sell USB-stick Lion installers. Be prepared to do a lot of research, and end up with a possibly unstable system, if you want to follow that approach. And don't expect games to run well on it.
  9. amdfangirl said:
    I campaigned against this decision. However, I only moderate things, not set policy.

    PM jpishgar if you want something changed. You have my full support on this issue.

    I will. Thanks!
  10. Ijack said:
    Tom's Hardware is an international site. It has been determined that restrictive EULAs are not legally binding in many jurisdictions. To ban discussion of subjects that are illegal in some particular countries would greatly limit what could be discussed. In any case, this is a question of contract law, not criminal law.

    But, in answer to the OP, creating a Hackintosh - particularly running Lion - is not a trivial concern; if you have enough knowledge to be successful you probably don't have to ask. But, if you really want to try, Apple sell USB-stick Lion installers. Be prepared to do a lot of research, and end up with a possibly unstable system, if you want to follow that approach. And don't expect games to run well on it.

    This logic would allow us to openly discussed how to bypass nearly all security measures on all platforms and networks. I am certain, that is not the intent behind Tom's Forums. Yes, it is a matter of contracts law, but can certainly have criminal outcomes in some cases. This matter is treading on very thin legal ice.
  11. And your logic wold allow us to discuss practically nothing. Should we follow the laws enacted in Iran and China, for example?

    Discussing installing a legitimate copy of OS X on generic computer platforms is not the same as discussing hacking, pirating software, or the like. Forward thinking nations have decide that if you pay for software you can then do what you like with it as long a you don't break copyright or similar laws. A similar question arises with ripping a CD, which is legal in the USA (to make a backup copy for personal use) but not in other countries. So are we to ban all discussion of such activity?

    The staff at Tom's Hardware have decided, no doubt with legal advice, that discussion of Hackintoshes is allowed. Good for them; there are enough attempts to limit our freedoms as it is. If I pay for software I'll run it wherever I choose to; but I certainly won't pirate software.
  12. Ijack said:
    And your logic wold allow us to discuss practically nothing. Should we follow the laws enacted in Iran and China, for example?

    Discussing installing a legitimate copy of OS X on generic computer platforms is not the same as discussing hacking, pirating software, or the like. Forward thinking nations have decide that if you pay for software you can then do what you like with it as long a you don't break copyright or similar laws. A similar question arises with ripping a CD, which is legal in the USA (to make a backup copy for personal use) but not in other countries. So are we to ban all discussion of such activity?

    The staff at Tom's Hardware have decided, no doubt with legal advice, that discussion of Hackintoshes is allowed. Good for them; there are enough attempts to limit our freedoms as it is. If I pay for software I'll run it wherever I choose to; but I certainly won't pirate software.

    That is absolutely why we shouldn't talk about how to bypass one OS and not another. You logic would allow us to talk about how to make Windows "free" and to use products a user did not pay for. It would also allow us to answer all of those "forgotten password" questions that bombard the forum threads.

    This is not a matter of following the laws of Iran or China. Your logic would imply we follow no laws. Period. If you can do it, then go for it. That is not what I thought Tom's stood for.

    This is not a matter of freedom. Take a deep breath and think objectively on the subject. The logic is simple. If you do for one, you do for all. Is that the path Tom's should take?
  13. No one is talking about making OS X "free" - that would be illegal. But installing a paid for copy on other hardware is not the same thing at all. I'm really surprised that you can't see a difference between pirated software and a properly paid for version. Luckily, the staff here do see the difference.

    This is a matter of freedom. If I pay for software then I decide what hardware to run it on.
  14. Deleted duplicate post. (Damned iPad!)
  15. Ditto.
  16. When you purchase OS X, you agree to a license to use it, based on the terms of the license (read contract). Technically, you don't own the product. Also, if you violate the terms of the license, you can be held liable.

    I more than see the difference. You are just wrong. You are violating the terms of the license you agreed to when you purchased the rights to use the license. While you are not a "thief" (because you did pay for the right to use), you are a "liar" in that you fraudulently accepted the terms of the contract and then violated that agreement.

    There is no argument here, you are simply wrong in your position. The staff of Tom's should also know better than to buy into such an argument. Any legal adviser worth his/her fee would advise not to allow this as it opens the site to actions by third parties (like Apple).

    Your freedom argument is baseless as it is based on a lie. Do you see the difference?
  17. What you fail to understand is that in many countries such restrictive licenses have been deemed to have no legal standing. Thus they cannot bind me. I cannot agree to an illegal licensing restriction.

    I guess we'll have to agree to disagree about what constitutes freedom.
  18. Toms Hardware might be liable in the country where Apple operates, ie. USA.

    Then again, what do I know about law?

    I think it's much easier to simply not discuss this kind of stuff.

    However, I am not going to argue with jpishgar's decision.

    Also here are some threads in the past:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/336-69-hackintosh-legal

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/291-69-hackintoshes-legal
  19. Interesting threads. I looked at both of them. From an objective viewpoint, folks argued for the position they wanted to take without really discussing the legality of the matter. What is clearly a violation of Apple's EULA has been ignored and Tom's is okay with that.

    I will drop my argument. I just hope that our otherwise great forum does not suffer any consequences for endorsing the use of OS X in an arguably illegal manner.

    I am pretty sure the laws are the same in the UK as the US on this matter as well. Something for ijack to consider.

    Its all good. Peace.
  20. Ijack said:
    What you fail to understand is that in many countries such restrictive licenses have been deemed to have no legal standing. Thus they cannot bind me. I cannot agree to an illegal licensing restriction.

    I guess we'll have to agree to disagree about what constitutes freedom.

    Lets look at this from a different perspective (I just had to explain this to my wife for an app we bought for her). If you buy an application or OS (say Windows) for 1 system, are you free to install it on another system if you have the means to do so? If so, is that legal?

    Even in those countries that have instituted different standards for what constitutes acceptable use, the above example would be deemed illegal (in terms of the "contract" violation). And, in many will constitute a type of theft.

    Academically, and likely in a court of law, there is no difference with the OS X argument.

    We agree to disagree, my friend, but I encourage you to think about this and how you define freedom. I think I know a little about defending freedom and this isn't it in any meaningful fashion.

    Be well.
  21. You confuse copyright law and software EULAs; they are very different things. And you claim greater legal knowledge than Tom's legal team. I think you are wrong on both counts.
  22. Nope. I understand the difference. BTW, the threads indicated by amdfangirl indicated virtually zero legal analysis. That, and one considers how "anti-Apple" Tom's can be at times, it comes as no surprise (arguably) that the position taken was what it was.

    This discussion is over, as far as I am concerned. A decision was made, I have asked for it to be reconsidered, we shall see. In the meantime, I can only hope sanity (and doing what is right) will prevail.

    Later.
  23. Like I said, if you have a problem, bring it up with jpishgar.
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