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Anyone using a HEATPIPE?

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September 5, 2003 11:24:53 AM

I say the review for the <A HREF="http://www.npowertek.com/product/nph-2.htm" target="_new">TTIC-NPH2 </A> over at <A HREF="http://www.overclockers.com/articles754/" target="_new"> overclockers.com </A> ages ago but still haven't found a place to buy one of the things. Now, just after installing my Vantec Aeroflows I notice <A HREF="http://www.revoltec.com" target="_new">Revoltec</A> have got a new cooler the <A HREF="http://www.revoltec.com/nl/produkte/rk001.htm" target="_new"> Avalanche</A> which also uses a heatpipe.

Does anyone have a heatpipe based cooler and if so where did you get it from?

<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/myanandtech.html?member=114979" target="_new">My PCs</A> :cool:

More about : heatpipe

a b K Overclocking
September 6, 2003 2:26:53 AM

Originally I thought this unit had the cooling fins adjoining the mounting base, which would make the heat pipe ineffective, but I see now that this is not the case. Still, with the parts in such close proximity it would make the heatpipe not very efficient. But the cooler itself remains efficient because if it's large surface area.

Also you might want to use a horizontal case, as that would allow the heated vapor to rise into the condensor more efficiently.

Would you like me to make you a heat pipe? Something perhaps that would allow you to mount the condensor outside the case?

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September 6, 2003 9:29:27 AM

Would you make one? I've always wanted to do that, and that way I could put a MASSIVE heatsink outside of my case. Or perhaps I could attached the Heatpipe to the case panneling, that way the case itself would act as a HS that would probably be big enough to operate without a fan.

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a b K Overclocking
September 6, 2003 5:28:06 PM

I'm already working on a design for a micro ATX desktop using an extruded aluminum case and flexible tubes from the condensor to the evaporator, similar in looks to the Coolermaster home theater case. It should be nearly silent. A real hot design (2/3 of a pun = PU), the outside of the case would probably hover around 15F (8C) above ambient.

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September 6, 2003 7:51:17 PM

The TTIC-NPH2 is one of the best rated coolers at overclockers.com. One of the reasons I was so attracted to it was the possibility for improved airflow. With the fan on top of the heatsink there is alot of airflow restriction and turbulence. This means a high speed fan and lots of noise are needed for optimum cooling. With a fan blowing air through the heatsink blades there is much less turbulence and airflow is much improved. I guess I got the idea from the Xeon wind-tunnel coolers. Secondly I quickly realised you could put a fan on each end of the cooler and reduce the fan speed accordingly.

Forget a horizontal case, I only have dual setups and the boards simply don't fit in a deskop case. One of the reasons for looking at these coolers is attaching 2x600g or copper to my motherboard is a bit worrying and secondly, dual boards are normally so crowded there's simply not enough room (okay, there is more room on a Xeon board but I'm waiting for Lindenhurst before I build a Xeon system).

Could you build a bent heatpipe? I'm thinking still have the mobo vertical but the heatpipes bent to go out the top of a cube case. Would that work as efficiently? To have the condenser at the back or on top of the case would be an awsome mod. Actually, how on earth do you build a heatpipe? The other possibility would be to rebuild a cube so that the mobo lies horizonally so the heatpipes can go straight out the roof and put the hard drives in the bottom. Hmmm, where are you Crashman, in the states?
I move there in 2 months so maybe it's a possibility.



<A HREF="http://www.anandtech.com/myanandtech.html?member=114979" target="_new">My PCs</A> :cool:
a b K Overclocking
September 6, 2003 8:26:43 PM

Yes, I noticed it used side fans which allow flow through cooling, as opposed to bouncing air off the base of the cooler. Now, as far as a push/pull settup, the pulling fan would be redundant to the pushing fan and not provide very much added airflow (by removing some pressure in front of the blowing fan, it could spin faster, but that's only good for a slight gain).

Have you ever seen 3U rackmounts? Those are the same size as a full sized desktop. And 4U rackmounts are the same size as a large desktop (a bit taller). Obviously you can put any ATX board in a 4U case. In fact, they're the same size as a midtower, but laying on it's side.

Making a heatpipe taller would make it work better. Heatpipes work given that at a certain pressure a certain coolant will boil at a certain temperature. You take a gas such as R134A, compress it to a liquid, at a pressure where it will boil at say 34C. Then when the bottom of the heatpipe (evaporator) reaches 34C, the liquid boils, rises into the cooler upper part (condensor), condenses on the inside of the pipe, and runs back down. As long as the coolant runs back down to the hotter part, you have a viable design.

You could take a cooler such as the one shown, cut it, extend it, and put an elbo on it, and have it refilled. You could also make your own out of copper pipe, but affixing the cooling fins would be a lot of solder work. You could make it like an old moonshine still and have a coil of copper tubbing sticking out, using the surface area of the tubes rather than fins. That is, as long as the coil of tubing was tipped the right way so as to allow the condensed coolant to run back down unabstructed.

So now that you understand how it works, you'll want the math! Figure out what temperature you want your CPU to run at. Find out what pressure is required to get your favorite coolant to become liquid at that temperature. Have your heatpipe evacuated (the air sucked out), and filled to that pressure.

One thing I should mention now is that as the coolant evaporates, the pressure will increase. Without a way to maintain constant pressure, the operating temperature will increase. So you'l likely get a temperature range, variable to the output of your processor.

Yes, I live in the states. I have a degree in mechanical design also.

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