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What is the best quiet HSF currently available

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a b K Overclocking
November 12, 2003 7:37:14 PM

Hi, I would like to have recomendations for the best and quietest HSF I could find for an AMD 2600+ CPU. I don't plan on overclocking and the "quiet" part is as important to me as the "temperature" factor. I want to stay in the air cooling category (at least for now) and right now I have two candidates:
- Vantec Aeroflow VA4-C7040
- Zalman CNPS7000A-Cu

Any other suggestions (with justifications please, I like to understand the choices I make :)  ) or comments?

More about : quiet hsf

November 13, 2003 12:26:27 AM

I would recommend the Zalman CNPS7000A-CU.

-Intel PIV 2.6C @ 3.575G -Asus P4P800 -OCZ Copper 2x256 4000EL memory @ 275mhz 3-4-4-8 -Sapphire 9800np @ 432/760 -SB audigy -120G Maxtor Diamond Plus9 S-ATA150 hdd -450 Enermax PSU
November 13, 2003 12:57:12 AM

I've been seriously looking at getting one of these.

My 1 question is, since ppl think the SP-94 is a better HS, is there a fan that I could get to go with the SP-94 that would give me the same or lower noise levels with even lower temps?
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November 13, 2003 2:20:10 AM

try SP-94 with Panaflo FBA09A12H on 7V, you have to hard press to say that is noisy combination, and Zalman are over rated for their noise anyway
November 13, 2003 2:46:32 AM

I'm wondering, what would be the difference in cooling if instead of going with the Panaflo FBA09A12H, I went with the FBA09A12L.

The high speed one has these specs


92mm High Speed fan. Model FBA09A12H.

2850 RPM fan speed
56.8 CFM air flow
35.0 dBA noise level
Power Consumption: 2.70W

While the low speed has these specs

92mm Low Speed. Model FBA09A12L.

2100 RPM fan speed
42.7 CFM air flow
27.0 dBA noise level
Power Consumption: 1.32W



Obviously the slower fan is quite a bit quieter, but whats the actual loss in cooling?
November 13, 2003 3:08:38 AM

SP94 is not exactly cheap. So SLK947U is good enough.

-Intel PIV 2.6C @ 3.575G -Asus P4P800 -OCZ Copper 2x256 4000EL memory @ 275mhz 3-4-4-8 -Sapphire 9800np @ 432/760 -SB audigy -120G Maxtor Diamond Plus9 S-ATA150 hdd -450 Enermax PSU
November 13, 2003 12:09:37 PM

Not cheap doesn't bother me. Although I don't have enough to get a nice water system. Any ideas about my above question regarding those 2 different fans?
November 13, 2003 1:28:16 PM

Since you're really into silent PC then i guess Panaflo low speed will do for you.

-Intel PIV 2.6C @ 3.575G -Asus P4P800 -OCZ Copper 2x256 4000EL memory @ 275mhz 3-4-4-8 -Sapphire 9800np @ 432/760 -SB audigy -120G Maxtor Diamond Plus9 S-ATA150 hdd -450 Enermax PSU
November 14, 2003 8:48:30 AM

Just wondering would a Zalman CNPS7000A-Alcu (Alcu is lighter lol) fit on a Asus P4P800 Motherboard?

thanks
November 14, 2003 2:13:18 PM

No, you gotta change the N.Bridge cooler first, since the stock is too tall, I used a Tiger chipset cooler and removed the fan.

-Intel PIV 2.6C @ 3.575G -Asus P4P800 -OCZ Copper 2x256 4000EL memory @ 275mhz 3-4-4-8 -Sapphire 9800np @ 432/760 -SB audigy -120G Maxtor Diamond Plus9 S-ATA150 hdd -450 Enermax PSU
November 15, 2003 3:28:47 AM

How loud is the tiger scottchen?
November 15, 2003 5:28:52 AM

Really quiet, about 20dB.

-Intel PIV 2.6C @ 3.575G -Asus P4P800 -OCZ Copper 2x256 4000EL memory @ 275mhz 3-4-4-8 -Sapphire 9800np @ 432/760 -SB audigy -120G Maxtor Diamond Plus9 S-ATA150 hdd -450 Enermax PSU
November 26, 2003 7:28:28 PM

CPU fan isn't the only noise the computer makes.
The NB fan can be replaced with a Zalman passive one.
HDs can be tightened with rubber seperators.
Graphics cards HSFs can also be replaced.
the PSU fan is usualy slow and doesnt make too much noise.
CD-ROMs can be really noisy, but you don't use them while you sleep (do you?) if you wanna watch a DVD, that's another issue, than you can slow down the optical drive.

----------
I'm a nuclear reactor cooling system programmer, if you see me running, it's probably already too late.
December 19, 2003 4:50:30 PM

Vantec Aeroflow

This HS just makes sense. Aluminum fins for fast heat disapation. Copper core for quick heat transfer away from the chip. A path down the center of the HS to get direct airflow to the copper core. And a fan that can utilize this path by not having the dead spot in the center like other fans.
I started with one of these HS and loved it. Have 2 other PCs that reside inside closed desks - heat was a problem. Changed these over to the Vantec Aeroflow and the temps are no longer a concern.
It seens like everyone ignores this HS. Don't understand why. I am not an OCer and maybe most here are and maybe the Vantec Aeroflow is not a good OCer or radical gamer HS. It does the job for me - and it is quiet. My case is 31c and the diode is 39c.
my specs
A7V333 w/AMD XP 2100
2x 120GB IDE drives
2x 36GB SCSI drives
ATI AIW 128 pro
SB Live
3Com LAN
FAX modem
CD/DVD ROM
CD-RW
in an Antec tower w/430w PS, in a partly enclosed space under a desk. I do have 2 rear fans along with the PS fan - 1 blowing out and the other one directly in-line with the CPU, blowing in.
Also running Seti 24/7

I have tried several different HS recomended here - solid copper, hybreds, heatpipes - and none worked as well as the Vantec Aeroflow. The design just makes sense.


For it is not what is seen, but what is not seen. :eek: 
December 19, 2003 7:37:48 PM

Quote:
Aluminum fins for fast heat disapation.

a myth.

the aeroflow isn't a bad heatsink though

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this signature area is too dern short, no space to put your system specs
December 19, 2003 11:34:22 PM

Copper conducts heat better than aluminum, but it also holds on to that heat more than aluminum. Aluminum radiates or cools off faster than copper but does not conduct heat as well as copper. Hence, the hybrid.
Let the copper move the heat from the chip quickly and transfer the heat to the aluminum where it can be cooled quickly.
.
quote
.

"It is a fact that copper is a good conductor of heat. It conducts heat faster than aluminum and that's one of the reasons why copper heatsinks got pretty famous in the heatsink department. While copper conducts heat faster, it had a drawback: it could not dissipate the heat it conducts very quickly. As a result, high powered fans were often used with copper heatsinks. Copper heatsinks are also easier to deform so pressing too much on them could alter the original form of the heatsink and might cause some problems. On the side of aluminum, aluminum heatsinks are much lighter. Aluminum heatsinks are known to dissipate heat well in contrast to copper. The problem of aluminum is that it conducts heat slower than copper. Aluminum heatsinks are not as easy to deform as copper and the are harder than copper. Since aluminum dissipates heat well, they are sometimes paired with lower-powered fans.
The heatsinks in this test are all made of a combination of copper and aluminum. The base of the heatsinks has a copper inlay while the rest of the heatsink is made of aluminum. This design works simple: copper conducts heat faster so that means it can get rid of the heat from the core of the CPU faster than aluminum. The copper base of the heatsink is forged into the aluminum heatsink. Heat from the CPU will move to the copper base and then, it goes up to the rest of the heatsink...the aluminum part where it can be dissipated easier. Pretty simple but it works."
http://www.planetsavage.net/hardware/cualhsf/index.shtm...

For it is not what is seen, but what is not seen. :eek: 
December 20, 2003 12:02:07 AM

I may want to backpedal a little here - and just a little. I had not looked at the Zalman HS. I really like its design. It looks as though it would take full advantage of airflow from the fan. It could cool vey well with a slower, quieter fan. BUT, at 773 gm ! Not me ! This quote from Zalman is kinda scary - "* Specified maximum weight for a cooler is 450g for the Intel Pentium 4 and the AMD Athlon 64, and 300g for the AMD Socket 462 CPU. Special care should be taken when moving a computer equipped with a cooler exceeding the weight guideline. Zalman Tech is not responsible for any damage that occurs when moving a computer.'
How about the CNPS7000-AlCu ?


For it is not what is seen, but what is not seen. :eek: 
December 20, 2003 1:15:44 AM

no, specific heat my freind.


If it isn't a P6 then it isn't a procesor
110% BX fanboy
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