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Why Power Supply Died?

Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

Tech support is sending me a new power supply for my 700XL that won't power
up. I had a problem about a year ago and the Country Store had put in two
new hard drives and a new power supply.

I'm wondering what makes a power supply fail. The computer lives in a
compartment in a computer desk. The front of the compartment is open, as is
a 6x12 inch area on the side and a 3 inch round hole in the top of the desk.
Could it have overheated?

Thanks, Allen
25 answers Last reply
More about power supply died
  1. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Allen;
    Hopefully the back is also wide open.
    Overheating can easily happen when a computer is enclosed.
    Some furniture makers know how to make nice furniture but know nothing
    of the needs of the computer for cooling.

    --
    Jupiter Jones
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "A. & C. Bredt" <abredt@nospam.com> wrote in message
    news:MO2fc.484$Zi3.386@twister.socal.rr.com...
    > Tech support is sending me a new power supply for my 700XL that
    won't power
    > up. I had a problem about a year ago and the Country Store had put
    in two
    > new hard drives and a new power supply.
    >
    > I'm wondering what makes a power supply fail. The computer lives in
    a
    > compartment in a computer desk. The front of the compartment is
    open, as is
    > a 6x12 inch area on the side and a 3 inch round hole in the top of
    the desk.
    > Could it have overheated?
    >
    > Thanks, Allen
  2. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    A power supply can fail for a number of reasons.

    Improper ventilation can cause overheating of the power supply and other parts
    inside a computer. Heat is one of the worst enemies of electronics.

    A poorly manufactured power supply can fail when one of its internal components
    bites the dust.

    An external power spike or surge can cause power supply failure. The typical
    surge protector/extension cord provides inadequate protection to a computer from
    external power fluctuations. An uninterruptable power supply with battery and
    voltage regulation circuits provides 1000x more protection.

    If the power supply innards become clogged with dust and dirt or the power
    supply fan stops spinning (usually due to the same dust and dirt), the power
    supply will inevitably overheat and fail. A regular cleaning of a computer
    using compressed air (especially if the environment is dusty, smoky, dirty, or
    full of animal hair) can add years of life to an entire computer... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2004 04:08:12 GMT, "A. & C. Bredt" <abredt@nospam.com> wrote:

    >Tech support is sending me a new power supply for my 700XL that won't power
    >up. I had a problem about a year ago and the Country Store had put in two
    >new hard drives and a new power supply.
    >
    >I'm wondering what makes a power supply fail. The computer lives in a
    >compartment in a computer desk. The front of the compartment is open, as is
    >a 6x12 inch area on the side and a 3 inch round hole in the top of the desk.
    >Could it have overheated?
    >
    >Thanks, Allen
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.

    How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open it each
    time to do it?

    Thanks, Allen

    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:407d34c3.1942662@news.charter.net...
    > A power supply can fail for a number of reasons.
    >
    > Improper ventilation can cause overheating of the power supply and other
    parts
    > inside a computer. Heat is one of the worst enemies of electronics.
    >
    > A poorly manufactured power supply can fail when one of its internal
    components
    > bites the dust.
    >
    > An external power spike or surge can cause power supply failure. The
    typical
    > surge protector/extension cord provides inadequate protection to a
    computer from
    > external power fluctuations. An uninterruptable power supply with battery
    and
    > voltage regulation circuits provides 1000x more protection.
    >
    > If the power supply innards become clogged with dust and dirt or the power
    > supply fan stops spinning (usually due to the same dust and dirt), the
    power
    > supply will inevitably overheat and fail. A regular cleaning of a
    computer
    > using compressed air (especially if the environment is dusty, smoky,
    dirty, or
    > full of animal hair) can add years of life to an entire computer... Ben
    Myers
    >
    > On Wed, 14 Apr 2004 04:08:12 GMT, "A. & C. Bredt" <abredt@nospam.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > >Tech support is sending me a new power supply for my 700XL that won't
    power
    > >up. I had a problem about a year ago and the Country Store had put in two
    > >new hard drives and a new power supply.
    > >
    > >I'm wondering what makes a power supply fail. The computer lives in a
    > >compartment in a computer desk. The front of the compartment is open, as
    is
    > >a 6x12 inch area on the side and a 3 inch round hole in the top of the
    desk.
    > >Could it have overheated?
    > >
    > >Thanks, Allen
    > >
    > >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    How dusty is the computer? The answer is relative. Start by estimating that
    the amount of dust inside has accumulated since you last opened up the computer
    or since you got the computer. If you are uncomfortable with the amount of dust
    you see, clean it more often. Depending on the environment where the computer
    is running, every 90 days may be necessary. Or maybe once every year.

    Yes, open up the chassis. Otherwise, compressed air will only swirl the dust
    bunnies around inside and they may well land in a worse place than from where
    they were dislodged. Make it easy on your lungs. Open the chassis, take it
    outside, and blast out the dust there. Not in a driving rain or blizzard, tho.
    :) ... Ben Myers

    On Wed, 14 Apr 2004 23:48:26 GMT, "A. & C. Bredt" <abredt@nospam.com> wrote:

    >I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    >
    >How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open it each
    >time to do it?
    >
    >Thanks, Allen
    >
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:407d34c3.1942662@news.charter.net...
    >> A power supply can fail for a number of reasons.
    >>
    >> Improper ventilation can cause overheating of the power supply and other
    >parts
    >> inside a computer. Heat is one of the worst enemies of electronics.
    >>
    >> A poorly manufactured power supply can fail when one of its internal
    >components
    >> bites the dust.
    >>
    >> An external power spike or surge can cause power supply failure. The
    >typical
    >> surge protector/extension cord provides inadequate protection to a
    >computer from
    >> external power fluctuations. An uninterruptable power supply with battery
    >and
    >> voltage regulation circuits provides 1000x more protection.
    >>
    >> If the power supply innards become clogged with dust and dirt or the power
    >> supply fan stops spinning (usually due to the same dust and dirt), the
    >power
    >> supply will inevitably overheat and fail. A regular cleaning of a
    >computer
    >> using compressed air (especially if the environment is dusty, smoky,
    >dirty, or
    >> full of animal hair) can add years of life to an entire computer... Ben
    >Myers
    >>
    >> On Wed, 14 Apr 2004 04:08:12 GMT, "A. & C. Bredt" <abredt@nospam.com>
    >wrote:
    >>
    >> >Tech support is sending me a new power supply for my 700XL that won't
    >power
    >> >up. I had a problem about a year ago and the Country Store had put in two
    >> >new hard drives and a new power supply.
    >> >
    >> >I'm wondering what makes a power supply fail. The computer lives in a
    >> >compartment in a computer desk. The front of the compartment is open, as
    >is
    >> >a 6x12 inch area on the side and a 3 inch round hole in the top of the
    >desk.
    >> >Could it have overheated?
    >> >
    >> >Thanks, Allen
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    jumper setting. Computer would not operate.

    At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.

    Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    computer is properly designed and ventilated.

    Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    removing dust is unnecessary.

    I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.

    "A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    > I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    >
    > How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    > it each time to do it?
  6. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Hmm. Never ever had a problem with a computer getting into difficulty as a
    result of my blasting it out with compressed air. Must be either dumb luck or
    highly refined technique. Several dealers and resellers in my neighborhood with
    whom I have a loose arrangement to exchange parts and repair/maintenance have
    never had a problem either.

    Admittedly a computer CAN survive with a lot of dust, dirt, dead mice, and
    animal hair inside it. But the chances of survival are generally better if the
    interior is somewhat clean, allowing clear and unimpeded air flow.

    I've also serviced a proprietary computer (a custom printer RIP) never ever
    cleaned by the so-called maintenance person. Opened up the chassis and found a
    ball about the side of a baseball consisting of cat hair, paper chaff, dust,
    dirt, and heaven knows what else. And that computer had a failed power supply.
    Luckily for my client, a common personal computer power supply fit right in, so
    there was no need for a service call from the other guy using parts paid via
    extortion.

    Factory environments are especially hard on personal computers, and some regular
    cleaning out of the dirt prolongs the life of the machine.

    That's my opinion, and you are just as free to have yours... Ben Myers

    On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 17:03:21 -0400, w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    >settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    >case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    >jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    >
    > At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    >holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    >either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    >required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    >fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    >most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    >
    > Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    >computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    >is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    >computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    >just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    >degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    >computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    >
    > Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    >necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    >this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    >because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    >ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    >removing dust is unnecessary.
    >
    > I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    >dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    >a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
    >
    >"A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    >> I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    >>
    >> How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    >> it each time to do it?
  7. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    I've used compressed air - from my compressor in the garage, not compressed air in a can - for more
    than six years and on many computers, never had a problem/ although I don't hold the nozzle too
    close to the case, unless I am cleaning out heat sinks and fans.
    Make an opening in the back of the computer desk where the fan on the power supply exhausts, if you
    have an additional fan in the back, make sure you have an opening for that one also. I clean mine
    out everytime I change a component or add something, which on this machine is quite often. Just
    added a NEC 2500A burner(nice unit) and because I have four case fans(thermo controlled)....but my
    overclocked AthlonXP 2500 mobile likes to be cool.


    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:407f1a0a.13034374@news.charter.net...
    > Hmm. Never ever had a problem with a computer getting into difficulty as a
    > result of my blasting it out with compressed air. Must be either dumb luck or
    > highly refined technique. Several dealers and resellers in my neighborhood with
    > whom I have a loose arrangement to exchange parts and repair/maintenance have
    > never had a problem either.
    >
    > Admittedly a computer CAN survive with a lot of dust, dirt, dead mice, and
    > animal hair inside it. But the chances of survival are generally better if the
    > interior is somewhat clean, allowing clear and unimpeded air flow.
    >
    > I've also serviced a proprietary computer (a custom printer RIP) never ever
    > cleaned by the so-called maintenance person. Opened up the chassis and found a
    > ball about the side of a baseball consisting of cat hair, paper chaff, dust,
    > dirt, and heaven knows what else. And that computer had a failed power supply.
    > Luckily for my client, a common personal computer power supply fit right in, so
    > there was no need for a service call from the other guy using parts paid via
    > extortion.
    >
    > Factory environments are especially hard on personal computers, and some regular
    > cleaning out of the dirt prolongs the life of the machine.
    >
    > That's my opinion, and you are just as free to have yours... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 17:03:21 -0400, w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    > >settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    > >case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    > >jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    > >
    > > At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    > >holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    > >either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    > >required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    > >fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    > >most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    > >
    > > Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    > >computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    > >is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    > >computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    > >just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    > >degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    > >computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    > >
    > > Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    > >necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    > >this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    > >because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    > >ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    > >removing dust is unnecessary.
    > >
    > > I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    > >dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    > >a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
    > >
    > >"A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    > >> I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    > >>
    > >> How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    > >> it each time to do it?
    >
  8. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    what did you do with the mouse?

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:407EF899.A463790C@hotmail.com...
    > Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    > settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    > case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    > jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    >
    > At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    > holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    > either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    > required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    > fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    > most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    >
    > Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    > computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    > is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    > computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    > just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    > degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    > computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    >
    > Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    > necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    > this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    > because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    > ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    > removing dust is unnecessary.
    >
    > I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    > dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    > a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
    >
    > "A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    > > I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    > >
    > > How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    > > it each time to do it?
  9. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Hi All

    Just wanted to add my 2 cents worth, I use my air compressor, portable
    type that I purchased to maintain my tires and have used it to blow out the
    computer with negative problems. I am careful with it and don't get to
    close. Surprised me how much dust came out of the computer. We vacuum
    twice a week and over a period time it still accumulates quite a bit of
    dust. Mainly in the exit fan area.

    Lee

    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "lazya" <lazya@email.com>

    > I've used compressed air - from my compressor in the garage, not
    >compressed air in >a can - for morethan six years and on many computers,
    >never had a problem/ >although I don't hold the nozzle too close to the
    >case, unless I am cleaning out heat >sinks and fans.
  10. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Was it a USB mouse, PS/2-style, serial, or one of the original Microsoft bus
    mice with a special card? ... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 08:01:51 -0400, "news" <stingray_2010@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >what did you do with the mouse?
    >
    >"w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    >news:407EF899.A463790C@hotmail.com...
    >> Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    >> settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    >> case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    >> jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    >>
    >> At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    >> holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    >> either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    >> required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    >> fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    >> most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    >>
    >> Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    >> computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    >> is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    >> computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    >> just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    >> degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    >> computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    >>
    >> Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    >> necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    >> this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    >> because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    >> ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    >> removing dust is unnecessary.
    >>
    >> I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    >> dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    >> a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
    >>
    >> "A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    >> > I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    >> >
    >> > How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    >> > it each time to do it?
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Do you clean a mouse with anything other than a finger
    nail? Why? There is nothing in a mouse that needs compressed
    air or even a vacuum to clean out. Nothing. Just scrap away
    the hardened dirt where mouse ball hits roller. Or buy an
    optical mouse and clean nothing.

    Bottom line from one who worked where reliability had to be
    100%. Never use compressed air to clean any electronics.
    This has been that well known for so many decades. Any
    properly trained repairman knows - never use compressed air.
    Unfortunately, too many computer 'experts' today never have
    such education or real world experience. Instead they have
    learned like too many auto mechanics have learned. Hearsay.

    Do the numbers - something little understood by computer
    people. Blowing out the dust makes an improvement so trivial
    as to be irrelevant. How many degrees cooler is that
    computer? If not at least 10 degrees C, then it really does
    not matter. Margin of error in the design makes all that
    cleaning irrelevant.

    Then we get to why people clean. Less heat means longer
    life. Yes. And when we apply numbers, that increased life
    expectancy is near zero. In fact the compressed air is more
    likely to reduce life expectancy than the dust. As long as
    the ventilation holes are clear, then the computer has more
    than sufficient cooling. No dust nor a cabinet should block
    those cooling holes. Clean dust only when it is convenient -
    and never use compressed air. Better to leave a coating (not
    to be confused with globs) of dust inside. Dust coating does
    not adversely effect anything - except those with a cleaning
    fetish.

    news wrote:
    > what did you do with the mouse?
  12. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Keep up.

    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:40808D6E.AB1DBD55@hotmail.com...
    > Do you clean a mouse with anything other than a finger
    > nail? Why? There is nothing in a mouse that needs compressed
    > air or even a vacuum to clean out. Nothing. Just scrap away
    > the hardened dirt where mouse ball hits roller. Or buy an
    > optical mouse and clean nothing.
    >
    > Bottom line from one who worked where reliability had to be
    > 100%. Never use compressed air to clean any electronics.
    > This has been that well known for so many decades. Any
    > properly trained repairman knows - never use compressed air.
    > Unfortunately, too many computer 'experts' today never have
    > such education or real world experience. Instead they have
    > learned like too many auto mechanics have learned. Hearsay.
    >
    > Do the numbers - something little understood by computer
    > people. Blowing out the dust makes an improvement so trivial
    > as to be irrelevant. How many degrees cooler is that
    > computer? If not at least 10 degrees C, then it really does
    > not matter. Margin of error in the design makes all that
    > cleaning irrelevant.
    >
    > Then we get to why people clean. Less heat means longer
    > life. Yes. And when we apply numbers, that increased life
    > expectancy is near zero. In fact the compressed air is more
    > likely to reduce life expectancy than the dust. As long as
    > the ventilation holes are clear, then the computer has more
    > than sufficient cooling. No dust nor a cabinet should block
    > those cooling holes. Clean dust only when it is convenient -
    > and never use compressed air. Better to leave a coating (not
    > to be confused with globs) of dust inside. Dust coating does
    > not adversely effect anything - except those with a cleaning
    > fetish.
    >
    > news wrote:
    > > what did you do with the mouse?
  13. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Let me know when the dust and dirt in your computer builds up enough to cause a
    critical fan to stop spinning, with one or more components burning up as a
    result... Ben Myers

    On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 21:50:38 -0400, w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > Do you clean a mouse with anything other than a finger
    >nail? Why? There is nothing in a mouse that needs compressed
    >air or even a vacuum to clean out. Nothing. Just scrap away
    >the hardened dirt where mouse ball hits roller. Or buy an
    >optical mouse and clean nothing.
    >
    > Bottom line from one who worked where reliability had to be
    >100%. Never use compressed air to clean any electronics.
    >This has been that well known for so many decades. Any
    >properly trained repairman knows - never use compressed air.
    >Unfortunately, too many computer 'experts' today never have
    >such education or real world experience. Instead they have
    >learned like too many auto mechanics have learned. Hearsay.
    >
    > Do the numbers - something little understood by computer
    >people. Blowing out the dust makes an improvement so trivial
    >as to be irrelevant. How many degrees cooler is that
    >computer? If not at least 10 degrees C, then it really does
    >not matter. Margin of error in the design makes all that
    >cleaning irrelevant.
    >
    > Then we get to why people clean. Less heat means longer
    >life. Yes. And when we apply numbers, that increased life
    >expectancy is near zero. In fact the compressed air is more
    >likely to reduce life expectancy than the dust. As long as
    >the ventilation holes are clear, then the computer has more
    >than sufficient cooling. No dust nor a cabinet should block
    >those cooling holes. Clean dust only when it is convenient -
    >and never use compressed air. Better to leave a coating (not
    >to be confused with globs) of dust inside. Dust coating does
    >not adversely effect anything - except those with a cleaning
    >fetish.
    >
    >news wrote:
    >> what did you do with the mouse?
  14. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    I have seen components compromised by small amounts dust particles.
    Some dust particles are conductive to some extent and as you know it
    does not always take much to damage electronics.
    Periodically blowing out a computer is potentially a very good thing
    and recommended.

    As long as you focus on just the dust-heat issue, you miss many other
    possibilities.
    More advanced technology requires we think outside of very narrow
    terms as a problem such as dust has the potential to cause other
    issues than just overheating.

    So while you suggest not blowing out because there is negligible
    temperature improvement, I suggest blowing out the dust to improve air
    circulation as well as remove potentially damaging contaminants.

    --
    Jupiter Jones
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:407EF899.A463790C@hotmail.com...
    > Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    > settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    > case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    > jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    >
    > At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    > holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    > either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    > required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    > fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    > most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    >
    > Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    > computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    > is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    > computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    > just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    > degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    > computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    >
    > Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    > necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    > this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    > because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    > ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    > removing dust is unnecessary.
    >
    > I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    > dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    > a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
  15. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    If you remove all the jumpers (hint:they are about a dollar for 100,
    buy a bag full...)and loose items you may vacuum away. Provided you do
    not have an ESD issue. Static discharges are the main cause of
    component failures on motherboards. Only vacuum with the humidity over
    40%, and the vacuum cleaner, the computer chassis,the technician, and
    the hose and nozzle must all be grounded. The computer should be
    hooked to ground through its power cord (or use a jumper) and the
    hose/nozzle must be a conductive ESD type. They are conductors, but
    not good ones: they have a designed high resistance that lets static
    charges bleed off rather than arc.

    A "toner vac" is ideal, but expensive. The Kirby will work, use the
    ESD wand and brush from the toner vac-available separately. Ground the
    Kirby case with a jumper. A conductive brush-again, not metal, but
    designated ESD safe-wielded by a tech who is properly grounded-through
    a 10-megohm resistor, as are used in commercial ESD leashes-is
    probably better.

    If the humidity is low, _lightly_ splash water around on the carpet
    first. Wipe the case with a slightly damp rag. No puddles, a little
    damp. Let thoroughly dry before plugging in. You can spray the carpet
    with a little diluted Downy, but don't get it on the machine anywhere.
    Only Downy has the high dollar anti-static ingredient in $100/gallon
    ESD spray used in all ISO-9000 electronics plants (as far as I know).
    Sta-Puf and Suavitel don't.
  16. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    You already have the list of every time dust has caused
    failures - including computers before PC existed. Dust
    problems are myths often associated with a tech who is
    'reaching' to solve a problem he never understood.

    Fans don't fail due to dust. They fail due to internal
    failures such as seized bearing, misplaced rotation sensor, or
    failed transistor. Been doing this for too many decades to
    fall for the 'too much dust' myth. No reason to use
    compressed air on electronics. Dust may create a marginal
    problem if ventilation holes are obstructed and computer
    operates in a 100 degree F room. Even a soft paint brush
    solves that problem.

    Ben Myers wrote:
    > Let me know when the dust and dirt in your computer builds up
    > enough to cause a critical fan to stop spinning, with one or
    > more components burning up as a result... Ben Myers
  17. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Well, you do it your way, I'll do it mine. Never the twain shall meet. Live
    and let live. And I won't take your remarks personally... Ben Myers

    On Sat, 17 Apr 2004 21:13:26 -0400, w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:

    > You already have the list of every time dust has caused
    >failures - including computers before PC existed. Dust
    >problems are myths often associated with a tech who is
    >'reaching' to solve a problem he never understood.
    >
    > Fans don't fail due to dust. They fail due to internal
    >failures such as seized bearing, misplaced rotation sensor, or
    >failed transistor. Been doing this for too many decades to
    >fall for the 'too much dust' myth. No reason to use
    >compressed air on electronics. Dust may create a marginal
    >problem if ventilation holes are obstructed and computer
    >operates in a 100 degree F room. Even a soft paint brush
    >solves that problem.
    >
    >Ben Myers wrote:
    >> Let me know when the dust and dirt in your computer builds up
    >> enough to cause a critical fan to stop spinning, with one or
    >> more components burning up as a result... Ben Myers
  18. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Jim;
    If you are pulling jumpers off with a vacuum, you already have at
    least one of the below issues:
    1. Too powerful a vacuum for the job.
    2. Jumpers way to loose...will eventually be a problem otherwise.

    The point of my post is cooling issues caused by dust is only one
    issue.
    If the focus is that narrow, other issues may result because of
    ignorance.

    I was not addressing ESD because that is beyond the scope of this
    thread.

    --
    Jupiter Jones
    Check the following link for some great problem solving newsgroups.
    http://support.microsoft.com/newsgroups/default.aspx
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "Jim-Ed Browne" <jimedbrowne@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:65228e33.0404171529.645aa4b5@posting.google.com...
    > If you remove all the jumpers (hint:they are about a dollar for 100,
    > buy a bag full...)and loose items you may vacuum away. Provided you
    do
    > not have an ESD issue. Static discharges are the main cause of
    > component failures on motherboards. Only vacuum with the humidity
    over
    > 40%, and the vacuum cleaner, the computer chassis,the technician,
    and
    > the hose and nozzle must all be grounded. The computer should be
    > hooked to ground through its power cord (or use a jumper) and the
    > hose/nozzle must be a conductive ESD type. They are conductors, but
    > not good ones: they have a designed high resistance that lets static
    > charges bleed off rather than arc.
    >
    > A "toner vac" is ideal, but expensive. The Kirby will work, use the
    > ESD wand and brush from the toner vac-available separately. Ground
    the
    > Kirby case with a jumper. A conductive brush-again, not metal, but
    > designated ESD safe-wielded by a tech who is properly
    grounded-through
    > a 10-megohm resistor, as are used in commercial ESD leashes-is
    > probably better.
    >
    > If the humidity is low, _lightly_ splash water around on the carpet
    > first. Wipe the case with a slightly damp rag. No puddles, a little
    > damp. Let thoroughly dry before plugging in. You can spray the
    carpet
    > with a little diluted Downy, but don't get it on the machine
    anywhere.
    > Only Downy has the high dollar anti-static ingredient in $100/gallon
    > ESD spray used in all ISO-9000 electronics plants (as far as I
    know).
    > Sta-Puf and Suavitel don't.
  19. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Do you think he was talking about the industrial-type compressed air that
    contains oil/water? I can see how that might be bad for electronics. The
    junk in the can you buy at Staples is probably OK.
    <ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    news:407f1a0a.13034374@news.charter.net...
    > Hmm. Never ever had a problem with a computer getting into difficulty as
    a
    > result of my blasting it out with compressed air. Must be either dumb
    luck or
    > highly refined technique. Several dealers and resellers in my
    neighborhood with
    > whom I have a loose arrangement to exchange parts and repair/maintenance
    have
    > never had a problem either.
    >
    > Admittedly a computer CAN survive with a lot of dust, dirt, dead mice, and
    > animal hair inside it. But the chances of survival are generally better
    if the
    > interior is somewhat clean, allowing clear and unimpeded air flow.
    >
    > I've also serviced a proprietary computer (a custom printer RIP) never
    ever
    > cleaned by the so-called maintenance person. Opened up the chassis and
    found a
    > ball about the side of a baseball consisting of cat hair, paper chaff,
    dust,
    > dirt, and heaven knows what else. And that computer had a failed power
    supply.
    > Luckily for my client, a common personal computer power supply fit right
    in, so
    > there was no need for a service call from the other guy using parts paid
    via
    > extortion.
    >
    > Factory environments are especially hard on personal computers, and some
    regular
    > cleaning out of the dirt prolongs the life of the machine.
    >
    > That's my opinion, and you are just as free to have yours... Ben Myers
    >
    > On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 17:03:21 -0400, w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    > >settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    > >case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    > >jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    > >
    > > At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    > >holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    > >either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    > >required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    > >fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    > >most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    > >
    > > Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    > >computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    > >is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    > >computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    > >just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    > >degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    > >computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    > >
    > > Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    > >necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    > >this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    > >because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    > >ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    > >removing dust is unnecessary.
    > >
    > > I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    > >dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    > >a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
    > >
    > >"A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    > >> I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    > >>
    > >> How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    > >> it each time to do it?
    >
  20. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    One of the factories I sell for had an old 286 PC a few years ago that
    stayed on 24/7 for about 3 years (all it did was operate a bridge between an
    ancient IBM card-based data collection system and an A/S400 computer). It
    died one day, and I opened it up for them. It looked just like the inside of
    a vacuum cleaner bag. Dust killed that one. On the positive side, we got
    another old 386 computer at a yard sale for 5.00 and replaced it!
    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4081D636.A231CAAE@hotmail.com...
    > You already have the list of every time dust has caused
    > failures - including computers before PC existed. Dust
    > problems are myths often associated with a tech who is
    > 'reaching' to solve a problem he never understood.
    >
    > Fans don't fail due to dust. They fail due to internal
    > failures such as seized bearing, misplaced rotation sensor, or
    > failed transistor. Been doing this for too many decades to
    > fall for the 'too much dust' myth. No reason to use
    > compressed air on electronics. Dust may create a marginal
    > problem if ventilation holes are obstructed and computer
    > operates in a 100 degree F room. Even a soft paint brush
    > solves that problem.
    >
    > Ben Myers wrote:
    > > Let me know when the dust and dirt in your computer builds up
    > > enough to cause a critical fan to stop spinning, with one or
    > > more components burning up as a result... Ben Myers
  21. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Beats me what he was talking about. I buy cartons of "Blow Off" in small
    quantities for my own use. I've also run into other brands with similar
    product. Nothing but air. Nothing but net? Using this stuff is a slam-dunk
    for me... Ben Myers

    On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 09:39:47 -0400, "Prilosec" <purple@nni.net> wrote:

    >Do you think he was talking about the industrial-type compressed air that
    >contains oil/water? I can see how that might be bad for electronics. The
    >junk in the can you buy at Staples is probably OK.
    ><ben_myers_spam_me_not @ charter.net (Ben Myers)> wrote in message
    >news:407f1a0a.13034374@news.charter.net...
    >> Hmm. Never ever had a problem with a computer getting into difficulty as
    >a
    >> result of my blasting it out with compressed air. Must be either dumb
    >luck or
    >> highly refined technique. Several dealers and resellers in my
    >neighborhood with
    >> whom I have a loose arrangement to exchange parts and repair/maintenance
    >have
    >> never had a problem either.
    >>
    >> Admittedly a computer CAN survive with a lot of dust, dirt, dead mice, and
    >> animal hair inside it. But the chances of survival are generally better
    >if the
    >> interior is somewhat clean, allowing clear and unimpeded air flow.
    >>
    >> I've also serviced a proprietary computer (a custom printer RIP) never
    >ever
    >> cleaned by the so-called maintenance person. Opened up the chassis and
    >found a
    >> ball about the side of a baseball consisting of cat hair, paper chaff,
    >dust,
    >> dirt, and heaven knows what else. And that computer had a failed power
    >supply.
    >> Luckily for my client, a common personal computer power supply fit right
    >in, so
    >> there was no need for a service call from the other guy using parts paid
    >via
    >> extortion.
    >>
    >> Factory environments are especially hard on personal computers, and some
    >regular
    >> cleaning out of the dirt prolongs the life of the machine.
    >>
    >> That's my opinion, and you are just as free to have yours... Ben Myers
    >>
    >> On Thu, 15 Apr 2004 17:03:21 -0400, w_tom <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Compressed air can even change critical dip switch
    >> >settings. Never use compressed air on electronics. In on
    >> >case, a user vacuumed the computer and therefore removed a
    >> >jumper setting. Computer would not operate.
    >> >
    >> > At most, gently vacuum or blow dust off of ventilation
    >> >holes. Nothing more. If a dust problem is that large, then
    >> >either an industrial grade computer for a harsh environment is
    >> >required, or some silly person installed too many fans. Five
    >> >fans inside a case does create dust problems especially since
    >> >most every computer works just fine with only one 80mm fan.
    >> >
    >> > Why did power supply die? Air that is exhausted from
    >> >computer must not be air that reenters computer. Ventilation
    >> >is why holes must be properly cut in a cabinet that holds a
    >> >computer - so that heat does not recycle. Computers must work
    >> >just fine when room air is 100 degree F. A computer in a 70
    >> >degree room just will never have failures due to dust - if
    >> >computer is properly designed and ventilated.
    >> >
    >> > Do not use compressed air on electronics. First it is not
    >> >necessary. Second it can cause other failures. Too many have
    >> >this 'clean' fetish. They always want to cure something only
    >> >because it looks dirty. Short of large globs of dust on
    >> >ventilation holes or large dust balls inside the case -
    >> >removing dust is unnecessary.
    >> >
    >> > I only remove dust because I don't like getting my hands
    >> >dirty if I happen to be inside the machine. Once even found
    >> >a death mouse. But computer worked just fine.
    >> >
    >> >"A. & C. Bredt" wrote:
    >> >> I have it on a UPS, but I see that it is very dusty inside.
    >> >>
    >> >> How often would you use compressed air to clean it? Should I open
    >> >> it each time to do it?
    >>
    >
    >
  22. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    I've cleaned some fan fins that had caked dust/lint/hair on them to the
    point that they added a small beaded effect to the edge of the fan. Now I'm
    no ventilation/fan expert but I would think that the added weight of all
    that crud would accelerate the demise of that fan. Also wouldn't those
    altered fan blade edges alter the efficiency of the fan? Fan outages can
    indeed croak a system, CPU or component.

    In the systems I've seen, the motherboard is usually mounted vertically and
    thus doesn't tend to be a dust collection point. Other components and areas
    tend to gather dust/hair/crud and I can't see that they'd be very
    susceptible to a short blast of compressed air.


    "w_tom" <w_tom1@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:4081D636.A231CAAE@hotmail.com...
    > You already have the list of every time dust has caused
    > failures - including computers before PC existed. Dust
    > problems are myths often associated with a tech who is
    > 'reaching' to solve a problem he never understood.
    >
    > Fans don't fail due to dust. They fail due to internal
    > failures such as seized bearing, misplaced rotation sensor, or
    > failed transistor. Been doing this for too many decades to
    > fall for the 'too much dust' myth. No reason to use
    > compressed air on electronics. Dust may create a marginal
    > problem if ventilation holes are obstructed and computer
    > operates in a 100 degree F room. Even a soft paint brush
    > solves that problem.
    >
    > Ben Myers wrote:
    > > Let me know when the dust and dirt in your computer builds up
    > > enough to cause a critical fan to stop spinning, with one or
    > > more components burning up as a result... Ben Myers
  23. Archived from groups: alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000 (More info?)

    Two fan problems involve bearing wear and location of the
    hall effect sensor. Bearing wear creates far more stress on
    fan. The hall effect sensor, if not perfectly flat on printed
    circuit board (inside fan) can create insufficient torque (fan
    stalls). These are manufacturing defects. Dust on fan blades
    is not significant. In fact, if dust was significant, then
    fan was defective when it left the factory.

    If fan suffers an early demise, then suspect power supply
    manufacturer or computer assembler is again selecting
    components only on price - quality and manufacturer integrity
    be damned.

    One reason why some clone assembler recommend annual
    cleaning - they install too many fans. One 80 mm fan is
    typically enough cooling for most every computer. Too many
    case fans create significant dust buildup problems. Do the
    numbers. Theoretical numbers confirmed by experimentation
    says the computer works just fine even in a 100 degree F
    room. Too many fans create dust problems.

    snoopy wrote:
    > I've cleaned some fan fins that had caked dust/lint/hair on them
    > to the point that they added a small beaded effect to the edge
    > of the fan. Now I'm no ventilation/fan expert but I would think
    > that the added weight of all that crud would accelerate the
    > demise of that fan. Also wouldn't those altered fan blade edges
    > alter the efficiency of the fan? Fan outages can
    > indeed croak a system, CPU or component.
    >
    > In the systems I've seen, the motherboard is usually mounted
    > vertically and thus doesn't tend to be a dust collection point.
    > Other components and areas tend to gather dust/hair/crud and
    > I can't see that they'd be very susceptible to a short blast
    > of compressed air.
  24. Why Do PSU’s Fail?

    Well, power supplies just fail. Failures can be instigated, and other times they simply give up. Below is a list of common factors that lead a power supply to it’s grave.

    * Age
    * Electric Interference (Lightning, Power Spikes, Etc.)
    * Dirt/Foreign Substance (Cigarette Smoke, House Dust, Etc.)
    * Brown Outs
    * Overheating and/or Ventilation Failures

    From the list above, the most common of all them is overheating and lightning. If you are a cigarette smoker or the computer is in a dusty environment, rest assure you will be replacing your PSU sooner than not.


    http://richard291990.blogs.linkbucks.com/archives/15
  25. This topic has been closed by Buwish
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