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water vs air

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March 28, 2004 5:02:46 PM

I have been researching for some time now the benefits of switching to water cooling. So far I haven’t found any….

I use the aero7+ with article silver 5. My processor is an AMD Athlon XP 2700+.

Here are my temps –
Not overclocked –
30 – idle
33 – load

Overclocked to 2.35 –
35 - idle
38 – load

This heatsink and fan only cost me $30 with fedex saver from newegg.
The water cooling solutions out there start at $80 and give the same Performance. In fact most that I have seen are worst then my results. Could anyone explain this to me?

PS If you have any suggestions on a water cooling kit that is worth buying it would be helpful. I would want it to be compatible with the sockets, 462, 754, 939, 940, T.

Supporting AMD with your breakable stuff.

More about : water air

March 28, 2004 6:54:48 PM

Well most external watercooling kit do sucks, examples are ones from globalwin, evercool, and thermaltake aquarius 2. If you actually compare to a watercooling kit with high flow pump 1/2" tubing, and high-end DD or Swiftech waterblocks, and 2x120mm radiators, or heatercores. Then they blow air away. The only waterblock i know that's universal is the 1 and only waterblock from Zalman, not sure about model number just go to www.zalmanusa.com and check.

-AMD Athlon64 3200+@2300mhz -3x512 Hynix PC3200 ram@192mhz 2.5-3-3-7 -Albatron 5900PV @ 509/1000 -SB Audigy -Adaptec 1210SA Raid -2x120G Seagate SATA150 7200.7 HDD Raid0 -Enermax 460watt psu
March 28, 2004 7:53:41 PM

So then why would anyone spend so much extra money on a water cooling system when you don’t get any benefits? (besides the “coolness” factor)

PS The temps I gave earlier are with my aero7+’s fan about halfway down, around 2700 rpms. This way its quiet.


Supporting AMD with your breakable stuff.
Related resources
March 28, 2004 9:59:29 PM

OVERCLOCKING.

PIV 2.8 @ 3.37, 2X256 Geil Platinum PC4000 @ 1:1, 240fsb, SP-94 with 92mm Tornado, IC7, (2)Raptors in raid 0, BFG5900nu flashed to 5950ultra bios, 500 watt psu.
March 28, 2004 10:00:02 PM

For overclocking!

Oops, sorry about the double post.
PIV 2.8 @ 3.37, 2X256 Geil Platinum PC4000 @ 1:1, 240fsb, SP-94 with 92mm Tornado, IC7, (2)Raptors in raid 0, BFG5900nu flashed to 5950ultra bios, 500 watt psu.<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by Lando95 on 03/28/04 06:00 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
March 28, 2004 11:03:52 PM

The biggest benifit of liquid cooling is the stability of temperature. There is very little change between load and idle and OCed and not. I have an external cooling system that I custom rigged, it cost me about $150 to liquid cool my cpu, northbridge, and graphics card. My temps stay at about 20C depending on the time of day (radiator is outside house). No matter how much I OC and no matter how much load I put on it the temps don't change.
I helped a friend put together a liquid cooling system for his computer that is completely internal. He is liquid cooling cpu, northbridge, graphics card, and 2 hard drives. His cpu and everything else max out at 35C and stay there. If he OCs enough it might go to 36 or 37C but I have never seen it go higher.
I'm not forcing liquid cooling on you or anyone but I must say it is worth every penny. I say good riddance to air cooling, the only thing allowed to cool my machine is liquid. If anything there is a certain "cool" factor when having the ability to say, "my computer is liquid cooled".
a b K Overclocking
March 28, 2004 11:14:55 PM

Quote:
watercooling is better than aircooling. thats the end of the question.

Water cooling IS air cooling!

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
a b K Overclocking
March 28, 2004 11:19:45 PM

Water cooling gives you two things, lots of fins and lots of latent heat capacity. You can get the same benefits by making your heatsink huge and heavy. The reason it was originally used in cars for example is packaging, you get to move your radiator to the front of the car. In a computer, you get to move your radiator outside the case. But then again, you could simply put a hole in your case and blow cool air at your heatsink.

If you have the room for a huge heatsink and a practical way to hold all that weight, fine, you'll have fewer parts to break. You can't say water cools better, because water cooling uses a radiator, a heatsink is a radiator, and given the same cool air, airflow, and fin area, both offer the same cooling.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
a b K Overclocking
March 29, 2004 6:44:50 AM

LOL, still it shouldn't need to be said that cooling performance is about surface area and fan power, and that water cooling kits are mostly about increasing surface area through use of a larger radiator.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
a b K Overclocking
March 29, 2004 6:47:44 AM

I would also like to point out that air cooled dirt bikes almost never overheat when idling, but water cooled bikes do. That's because neither use cooling fans, but the open fins of the air cooled bikes flow air due to convection easier than closed fins of the water radiators.

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
March 29, 2004 8:05:37 AM

true that.. though for showing off / slightly prving my point purposes let me say this: amd athlon 2500 @ ~2.2 Ghz, dnager den maze3, NO FAN, idle 34*C, max 36*C :smile:

thank you and good day

<b>and now for something completely different</b>
...<b><A HREF="http://www.bytethiscomputers.sytes.net/site/specs.html" target="_new">system specs</A></b>
a b K Overclocking
March 29, 2004 8:29:09 AM

And your point is?

<font color=blue>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a hero as big as Crashman!</font color=blue>
<font color=red>Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an ego as large as Crashman's!</font color=red>
March 29, 2004 11:00:01 AM

out of curiosity, is the temperature shown by the water cooler suppose to be different from the bios?
March 29, 2004 5:43:11 PM

i am going to buy a64 3000+ in a week or less. can you recommend a quiet/cheap water cooling solution kit. I was thinking about Global Win Silent Stream Water Cooling Kit, its about $80.

Supporting AMD with your breakable stuff.
March 29, 2004 5:52:26 PM

The globalwin is worse than the AMD stock cooler lol. for Athlon64 I'd stick with stock, it can handle 1.7Vcore, i've pushed my CPU up to 2400mhz with stock cool. I have the 3200+.

-AMD Athlon64 3200+@2300mhz -3x512 Hynix PC3200 ram@192mhz 2.5-3-3-7 -Albatron 5900PV @ 509/1000 -SB Audigy -Adaptec 1210SA Raid -2x120G Seagate SATA150 7200.7 HDD Raid0 -Enermax 460watt psu
March 29, 2004 6:54:20 PM

well, i use motherboard monitor and its pretty exact
the temp shown in the bios will be different from the temp you get when in windows... if you have a temp monitor thats seperate from the pc (like a digi-nurse or something) then the external temp monitor would be the "right" one vs the bios

<b>and now for something completely different</b>
...<b><A HREF="http://www.bytethiscomputers.sytes.net/site/specs.html" target="_new">system specs</A></b>
!