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Netbook Market 40% Down - Microsoft

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Anonymous
May 3, 2011 4:20:04 AM

Are netbooks slowly fading away? Microsoft mentioned during its quarterly earnings call that the overall PC market contracted by about 8% in the first quarter of year, which was at least in part driven by a massive 40% decline in netbook sales.

Netbook Market 40% Down - Microsoft : Read more
May 3, 2011 5:01:27 AM

tablets are a fad.
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May 3, 2011 5:20:31 AM

Smartphones took a share of netbooks before tablets were even becoming interesting. If you can browse the web and check your mail on your phone, there's no need to use a netbook for those basic functions. Tablets took another share on their own because they work well for basic media and ebooks. Netbooks do however have some advantages like upgradability, a real OS, and a keyboard that simple OS tablets can't compete with. There is a place for all these devices because the customer's needs differ.

The market is changing though when it comes to portable devices. We're seeing a lot of "hybrids" between tablets and netbooks. If they can find the right mix to make a product that fits everyone's needs, that hybrid device could put netbooks AND tablets out of business. Netbooks themselves seem to be at the limit of their abilities as well. Fusion was supposed to be the game changer for netbooks, but if you look at the devices using the E-350, it's pretty much either cheap, full size, lowend notebooks or expensive, high end (by netbook standards) netbooks. The original point of netbooks was to be affordable, otherwise they're just the "ultraportables" of old that never sold. You still have to go Atom if you want a cheap netbook (even though you can get an HP DM1Z rather cheap if you play HP just right). So I think the traditional netbook might be going out of fashion, returning to it's ultraportable roots.
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May 3, 2011 5:32:56 AM

netbooks and tablets will share market for a while.

if i want a mobile computer for typing and crap, ill get a netbook.
if i want a mobile thing for internet, id go a tablet

but if i want anything else. ill build a pc.

untill a tablet incorperates a real keyboard and not an on screen pos, and a stand that is built in, there will always be a netbook market.

at least... until laptops as in 15inch" get really cheap, like 500$ and 1080p capable.
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May 3, 2011 5:37:01 AM

sell a good one for 100 and I'll buy it.
xD
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May 3, 2011 6:04:02 AM

any sane person wont spend $600 on a tablet
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May 3, 2011 7:50:55 AM

alidan... untill a tablet incorperates a real keyboard and not an on screen pos, and a stand that is built in, there will always be a netbook market.


Acer 1820ptz along with another three from memory
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May 3, 2011 7:57:16 AM

proton9any sane person wont spend $600 on a tablet

There are a lot of things a sane person won't do. It all comes down to the definition of sane.
Even if I would not get a tablet, I can understand people getting one and willing to part from $600 to get it. Demand and supply will regulate the price. In any circumstance there will be people with unfulfilled desires, but IMO it's better to have a society when such unfulfilled desire is from not affording it while there, than because there are too few demands to justify a tablet being produced at all. If someone wishes for a tablet, they can work and be rewarded $ for being a productive member of society, and then go get the tablet of their desire. It is very functional and sane as I see it.
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May 3, 2011 9:36:21 AM

Netbooks never got a good start. The specs were always on the lowest side.
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May 3, 2011 12:12:28 PM

proton9tablets are a fad.


A lot of laptops and desktops are going to be replaced once we can make 12-13" tablets light enough to be handheld.
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May 3, 2011 12:53:38 PM

Intel cheating? Whats new.
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May 3, 2011 12:56:47 PM

Tablets aren't a fad, plan and simple. Although, I don't care for them, many users who only want to check emails and watch a quick news video are going to jump onto tablets. Desktops aren't going to be replaced for individuals that are gamers, programers, and others that require fast and powerful pc's. But, there are a lot more users that JUST check emails.
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May 3, 2011 1:21:24 PM

EeePad seems the way to go. Idea is simple and brilliant: you want to use your netbook somtimes like notebook (with keyboard) and sometimes as tablet.

I wonder what has happened to notebook sales, didn't low budget notebooks sales increase?
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May 3, 2011 1:56:31 PM

kinggravesSmartphones took a share of netbooks before tablets were even becoming interesting. If you can browse the web and check your mail on your phone, there's no need to use a netbook for those basic functions. Tablets took another share on their own because they work well for basic media and ebooks. Netbooks do however have some advantages like upgradability, a real OS, and a keyboard that simple OS tablets can't compete with. There is a place for all these devices because the customer's needs differ.The market is changing though when it comes to portable devices. We're seeing a lot of "hybrids" between tablets and netbooks. If they can find the right mix to make a product that fits everyone's needs, that hybrid device could put netbooks AND tablets out of business. Netbooks themselves seem to be at the limit of their abilities as well. Fusion was supposed to be the game changer for netbooks, but if you look at the devices using the E-350, it's pretty much either cheap, full size, lowend notebooks or expensive, high end (by netbook standards) netbooks. The original point of netbooks was to be affordable, otherwise they're just the "ultraportables" of old that never sold. You still have to go Atom if you want a cheap netbook (even though you can get an HP DM1Z rather cheap if you play HP just right). So I think the traditional netbook might be going out of fashion, returning to it's ultraportable roots.



All of these devices have their own niches, but they also have their own problems.

Smart phones are probably the best if you want a portable device. the trouble with them is you have to have a cell phone plan to use them even if you want to use WiFi. And worse yet, you often have to pay extra to use the phones WiFi function.

Tablets are like smart phones, but don't have phone cabilities. And for me, touch screens just get plain nasty. Also they're so damn expensive for a machine with such limited functions. Although you don't have to pay anyone to use WiFi.

Netbooks are for me the best option, but once again the prices are questionable. For the price of a top end netbook, you can get a low-priced notebook with more ram, a disc drive and a real os and not the dumbed down version of that os. Of course they are more portable than a notebook, but not as portable as a smart phone or tablet.

What we really need is a smart phone sized WiFi netbook. Makeit a bit larger than a smart phone with a keyboard that folds over a touchscreen. The touchscreen replaces the touchpad functions.

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May 3, 2011 3:13:58 PM

alidannetbooks and tablets will share market for a while.if i want a mobile computer for typing and crap, ill get a netbook.if i want a mobile thing for internet, id go a tabletbut if i want anything else. ill build a pc. untill a tablet incorperates a real keyboard and not an on screen pos, and a stand that is built in, there will always be a netbook market. at least... until laptops as in 15inch" get really cheap, like 500$ and 1080p capable.


There are already laptops in $400-$500 range that can do 1080p no problem. I bought one from bestbuy recently for like $349! lol
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May 3, 2011 3:35:25 PM

Personally, I don't like carrying anything around larger than a standard wallet. If I can't fit it into my pocket, its staying home. Right now I use a standard cell phone. I've had to use the internet on it a few times while on the go, and it did its job very slowly and painfully, but it worked.

I suppose then for myself, I'd never upgrade beyond a reasonably sized smart phone though presently i dont have a need for one. I also don't want to pay for a monthly data plan if Im going to find the few offline apps i like and need for it.

I've played around with netbooks and there again, they are painfully slow. So here's something more expensive than a cell phone or smart phone and it is bigger yet still is dreadfully slow. Due to its large increase in cost and size, without a significant boost in performance, its a tough sell.

I've never used a tablet so I can't say much other than again the size and added cost turns me off. If I had a need for tablet type features, I'd rather go for a laptop that has a swivel or flip screen that converts it into a tablet b/c atleast then its got better performance, upgradeable memory, and additional customization to suit my needs.

If you wanna carry around a big piece of hardware, might as well go all out and buy the laptop with tablet features. Take your cell phone out of your pocket and connect it as a modem to your laptop or have a mobile card for it.
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May 3, 2011 3:36:48 PM

I agree with everyone who dislikes tablets. I think they're a hybrid that just kinda got thrown in there, and it doesn't fill any need in my life. I have a laptop, and I have a phone... why do I need a phone the size of a small laptop that can't make calls?
They may be "fun" for other people, but they're useless to me (i.e. people who don't have piles of cash to burn, and actually buy things according to their value). Just like Apple products. Burn. =)
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Anonymous
May 3, 2011 4:40:04 PM

Netbooks and tablets both suck, it's going to eventually redux down to just smartphones and laptops for 90% of people. Smartphones for true mobility, laptops for real work. Smartphones that dock into laptops could become the new mainstream PC, where laptops have enough enough muscle for most people. Those who do hardcore gaming, or rendering work will still use a desktop.

PS: The "netbook" market may be down, because AMD Brazos is superior to Atom, however, most of the products containing Brazos are ~12 inch laptops, not netbooks(AMD doesn't force OEMs to screen size limitations like Intel does, the ~10 form factor just sucks). If you redefine netbook to be anything with Atom or Brazos, with a keyboard and screen attached, the market may not be down at all.
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May 3, 2011 4:41:09 PM

I think the star trek: TNG people should sue apple for copying the pad :p 
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May 3, 2011 5:50:15 PM

mmm.... just bought a netbook a few days ago. It very much serves a niche purpose for me. I bought it and loaded National Geographic Topo maps on it so that I could take it camping and pull up topo's from CA and NV on a larger screen than just a GPS screen.

Advantages over a tablet:
1. Runs Windows 7 (so that I can install the Topo maps).
2. MATTE SCREEN (given I want to use it outside this was a critical factor).
3. Cheap. Less than $300.00

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May 3, 2011 5:51:53 PM

To me Netbook is just a transitional product, proving the point that price and mobility are the key, when most people do not perform many (serious) tasks on their mobile devices.

Back then we only had ultra portable with ridiculous price that puts people off, while cheaper laptops are bulky and inconvenient.

There is nothing bad about Netbook phasing out completely, it made a significant point in the history of mobile computing evolution and lived a good life while it lasted.
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May 3, 2011 6:02:12 PM

Whoever said tablets do not have phone functionality must not know that outside the US a lot of them do. Blame your carriers not the tablet manufacturers.
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May 3, 2011 7:14:37 PM

Tablets just played a very small part of the game. Smartphones do as well. So do cheap notebooks and then E-350 fusion chip is sort of half netbook half notebook so it's to say what counts. Lastly most people who needed a netbook (cheap, small, efficient laptop) probably got one by now.

So with the future fusion chips and tablets coming with a keyboard dock the whole space will get mangled up. Nothing will die off but devices will become more and more similar. Personally I think future products will be like the Atrix 4G and the ASUS transformer. Especially when Windows 8 comes out and ARM chips will be super beefy.
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Anonymous
May 3, 2011 7:46:53 PM

I wonder if the same fate awaits the Tablet? Many bought Netbooks because they were cheap and I imagine the same is happening for Tablets. The advantage Tablets have is a dedicated OS that works better. I have used a Tablet for several months and have to say it cannot replace my Laptop. It many times can be used in place of it. But too me it still has limitations such as a smaller screen and a slower CPU. You are also tied to a App store of some type. Apple has done the best with the iPad because they have worked to tie it in with the rest of the Apple ecosystem. But Android to me is still a work in progress. If I had a choice between a laptop and a tablet for my computing. I would still choose a laptop.
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May 3, 2011 8:13:41 PM

Once tables have OLED screens (direct viewing in sunlight), are light enough to hold in one hand, can skype (wifi or cell), watch video, play music, browse the web, read books, run programs remotely from my desktop, GPS/mapping, engine diagnostics/instrument display for my car/boat, act as a remote for my TV, give me something to doodle on, are waterproof, durable and have a battery that lasts for at least 6-8 hours and oh yeah cost less than $300 I'll take three and ditch everything but my main PC and server.

Until then...not interested.
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May 3, 2011 9:16:54 PM

For anyone with brains netbooks > tablets... I just don't get how people spend as much as $400 more for something that doesn't have a real OS, inferior hardware (that's saying something compared to netbooks), alot less space for your stuff and no keyboard; and in most cases no Flash (taking to you iPad. But they're shiny and thin so they must be good :) .
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May 3, 2011 9:40:10 PM

I saw that coming before tablets even got popular.
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May 3, 2011 10:20:34 PM

Use to think tablets were a fade till I bought one. Now that I have one, my pc/laptop sit idle 85% of the time. Those who discount them have not tried one.

These easily replace day-planners and then some. Calenders, contacts, tasks, ability to transport work files, etc make these slick little machines.

Also, Asus has a nice little BT keyboard/mouse dock. Next Honeycomb update will have BT mouse support, keyboard support already exist. Combine this with a 1080p monitor, and most wouldn't need a laptop anymore.

Tablets are here to stay, their acceptance my be slow, but it's growing steadily. Those who get them see there true potential. Asus $399 Honeycomb table only helps push tablets into the mainstream.
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May 3, 2011 10:51:48 PM

kinggravesNetbooks themselves seem to be at the limit of their abilities as well. Fusion was supposed to be the game changer for netbooks, but if you look at the devices using the E-350, it's pretty much either cheap, full size, lowend notebooks or expensive, high end (by netbook standards) netbooks. The original point of netbooks was to be affordable, otherwise they're just the "ultraportables" of old that never sold. You still have to go Atom if you want a cheap netbook (even though you can get an HP DM1Z rather cheap if you play HP just right). So I think the traditional netbook might be going out of fashion, returning to it's ultraportable roots.
E-350 is the fastest and most power hungry chip of the Brazos lineup (it's a Zacate chip). So of COURSE it isn't going to be in the slowest, cheapest models. Try looking at some Ontario models like the C-30 and C-50. Also it is still fairly new, and there aren't that many models on the market competing with each other on price. Unlike the tons of Atom variants.

Also, "Fusion" refers to not only Brazos platform (Ontario and Zacate), but also the upcoming Lynx platform (Llano).
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May 4, 2011 1:20:14 AM

I don’t believe the netbook will go away, but it will definitely lose market share against the tablet.
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May 4, 2011 1:38:25 AM

I don't understand why everyone is looking at tablets as the culprit...

Smartphones with 4"+ touchscreen screens are the problem. I can surf the web, email, call, and text with this one device.
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May 4, 2011 7:19:38 AM

See, it was a fad. Why anyone would want to live with underpowered machines never made sense to me.
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