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Worst virus known to man

Last response: in Windows 7
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November 7, 2010 3:39:33 AM

Its not crashing yet. but i swear this virus is all over me what ever i do, this is my first time having a harddrive over 40gigs. running 1000g 6mb/s 64 cache so i supposed it could manifest with ease.
It started off simple, the little random clicks, then process explorer stopped working (a registry was deleted). just recently ive mostly been unable to start programs or to turn them off. everytime i look for an anti-v the screen goes white and freezes up most apps (coincidently my DVI moniter died recently in the same manner off my old hd). im running off a second user account with little liege.

I dont know where to start, but info would be appreciated.
every anti-v i use doesnt detect anything. nortan360, security essentials, Vipre, pc tools, trend micro, avast!
im running win7 64 bit

More about : worst virus man

a c 215 $ Windows 7
November 7, 2010 3:49:20 AM

Sounds more like the drive is faulty... Viruses don't make hard drives click. After using 6 different virus scanners on your system, I think it's safe to say that you don't have an infected machine.

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a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
November 7, 2010 4:17:03 AM

I tend to agree with The_Prophecy. Clicks are usually a sign of failing drives.

Run through the malware guide in my signature. If you've got an infection, that'll get it.
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November 7, 2010 8:53:07 AM

I can concur with the other guys. Hard drive clicking is NOT good. Run the virus scans, but first back up all important files, and be prepared to get a new drive. Usually clicking means you might have the bearings going out of the drive, or could be the heads crashing into the hard disk, not good. If you don't detect anything in the malware scans though, I'd say run a disk defrag. Auslogics disk defrag is ok, and free. Much faster than the windows defrag too. Also, run chkdisk, go to computer, right click on C: drive, properties, under system tools, run the error checking tool, and have it check and attempt repair of bad sectors.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 7, 2010 12:10:58 PM

Personally I wouldn't run any more checks on the drive because you're just wasting operating hours.

That drive is going to die, and going to die soon - get EVERYTHING you want to keep off of it now before you lose the lot. Then feel free to run checks.

Also, turn on SMART monitoring in the BIOS as that may well give you a message or two on boot if the drive is failing.

I've had 3 drives fail on me in 2 weeks on lost some irreplaceable work - I've learned the hard way to be paranoid of clicking drives and instantly expect the worst.
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November 7, 2010 11:20:10 PM

Let's say that is a virus, let's say it's also hard drive failure. Test for both using a linux live CD(pref Ubuntu). Scan for viruses, and also do some hdd diagnostics.
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November 8, 2010 3:24:19 PM

To LePhurron, if you have had 3 drives go in 3 weeks, I would be checking your power supply. Drives typically should run for years and not just die like that.
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2010 3:57:35 PM

ohiou_grad_06 said:
To LePhurron, if you have had 3 drives go in 3 weeks, I would be checking your power supply. Drives typically should run for years and not just die like that.


Unrelated incidents and the most unfortunate synchronicity:

Drive 1: SMART monitoring messages got ignored for 3 months, then I was informed too late
Drive 2: Dropped from a few feet but seemed OK - I only found out when the drive died
Drive 3: 7-year old, heavy load drive went to the spinning platters in the sky


Suffice it to say I wasn't too happy!
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a b $ Windows 7
November 8, 2010 8:54:27 PM

LePhuronn said:
Unrelated incidents and the most unfortunate synchronicity:

Drive 1: SMART monitoring messages got ignored for 3 months, then I was informed too late
Drive 2: Dropped from a few feet but seemed OK - I only found out when the drive died
Drive 3: 7-year old, heavy load drive went to the spinning platters in the sky


Suffice it to say I wasn't too happy!

OOps
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June 1, 2014 9:32:10 AM

I am posting for the benefit of Google searchers, knowing the thread is old.

The best way to clean a badly infected system is to make a bootable rescue disk on another clean system (a friend, etc) and run a rootkit/virus scan that way. The virus can't get a toehold when the rescue disk boots, because it is coming from a CD, which can't be written! This will give the virus scanner a chance to find the problem and fix it.

The Kaspersky Rescue disk has worked well for me in the past. I know there may be other similar products but this is one I've actually used and can recommend as working effectively. I have no connection to Kaspersky Labs whatsoever.
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