Maximum Safe Temperature for AMD Tbird 2600+?

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Hello,

I have a Soyo KT400 Dragon Lite and it keeps shutting off. The mobo
automatically shuts down when it thinks the cpu temp is greater than
85 degress celcius. So I just upped it to 90 degrees celcius. I hope
it doesn't get so hot that it stops working. I have looked on AMD
website and I've done searches on Google with no luck. I want to know
what the highest safe temperature I can run my AMD 2600+ at?

Steven
3 answers Last reply
More about maximum safe temperature tbird 2600
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    Steven wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > I have a Soyo KT400 Dragon Lite and it keeps shutting off. The mobo
    > automatically shuts down when it thinks the cpu temp is greater than
    > 85 degress celcius. So I just upped it to 90 degrees celcius. I hope
    > it doesn't get so hot that it stops working. I have looked on AMD
    > website and I've done searches on Google with no luck. I want to know
    > what the highest safe temperature I can run my AMD 2600+ at?
    >
    > Steven

    85'C is right on the line.

    Hopefully your CPU is not actually running at those temps
    and instead you merely have a temperature measurement
    problem.

    And have you checked to the most obvious suspect - a
    dead cpu fan ? Most people can tell when this happens
    just by the change in the noise their system makes, but
    people with bad hearing - me - need to open the case and look.

    As well, if your system was put together using a thermal
    paste between the cpu instead of a thermal pad, it might
    be time to refresh the paste. Remove the heatsink, wipe
    the old paste off of the heatsink and cpu, and apply
    fresh paste. There is (was ?) an instructional video at
    the Artic Silver site - its been at least two years since
    I looked.
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    Hi Rob, thank you so much for your response. Actually I have been
    running my computer with the case off and I can see the fan spinning.
    I even ran my finger across it to make sure it works and it does. The
    fan I bought is one of those models designed to make very little
    noise, it has a limiter of something like 40,000rpm or something so it
    revolves a little slower than your standard "run-of-the-mill" cpu
    cooling fan. Hence, it may be the fan itself that is the culprit. No
    matter, I'm not buying a new fan (unless I know I can get results),
    because computer noise to me is a top priority. I specifically
    targeted my Nexxus fan because of it's low 35 dB output. Funny thing,
    whenever I go into Staples or Office Max and listen to the systems on
    display (HP, Compaq, Sony, etc) they are all real silent. I remember
    back 2 yrs ago, way before the Pentium 4 came out. There were systems
    out there that were literally "silent". Gosh I wish I had one of those
    systems. Maybe it's time for a store bought computer.
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    Steven wrote:

    > Hi Rob, thank you so much for your response. Actually I have been
    > running my computer with the case off and I can see the fan spinning.
    > I even ran my finger across it to make sure it works and it does. The
    > fan I bought is one of those models designed to make very little
    > noise, it has a limiter of something like 40,000rpm

    Surely you mean 4,000 !

    > or something so it
    > revolves a little slower than your standard "run-of-the-mill" cpu
    > cooling fan. Hence, it may be the fan itself that is the culprit. No
    > matter, I'm not buying a new fan (unless I know I can get results),
    > because computer noise to me is a top priority. I specifically
    > targeted my Nexxus fan because of it's low 35 dB output. Funny thing,
    > whenever I go into Staples or Office Max and listen to the systems on
    > display (HP, Compaq, Sony, etc) they are all real silent.

    Keep in mind that those demo systems are sitting there doing
    nothing much. They are often running at just a few percent
    of the CPU capability - so the fans get throttled back. Get
    a salesman to enter the password for you so you can do something
    a little more demanding and you will hear the fans spin up to
    a more familiar level.

    However, the big brand machines are often a little better
    engineered and assembled. Even just tidying the cables
    up so they aren't fluttering in the airstream can make a
    noticeable difference in noise levels.

    I remember
    > back 2 yrs ago, way before the Pentium 4 came out. There were systems
    > out there that were literally "silent". Gosh I wish I had one of those
    > systems. Maybe it's time for a store bought computer.

    I switched someone over a while ago from a regular Athlon XP2400+
    with the stock heat sink and fan to a 1.45 volt mobile Athlon 2600+
    using a Zalman flower cooler. No fans left in that system except in
    the PSU. Nothing else making noise in there but the DVD drive and
    the hard drives. The cpu runs at 63'C under load - undoubtedly helped
    a great deal by being able to run at only 1.45 V. He is currently
    debating whether or not he wants to spend a little more to get a
    fanless PSU.
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