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AMD M vs. pentium M(Centrino) tests, ideas?

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Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 22, 2004 10:15:07 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Hey,
I have to get a good Laptop for my girl friend, but don't know
what is best.

I know the
Centrino
bundel is great, but what about a AMD
M
+ w-Lan,
which is better (haven't heard anything about the AMD
M
)?


:?: Which has a better performance? Which runs longer on one
battery?



:idea: She needs to be very mobile (lite and long
battery life
).
it is more important that it is lite rather than big screened.

:arrow: we have about 1300€ to spend.

:?: any tips? what would be a good notebook?

thanks previously for the help :wink:

cas

==============
Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
August 22, 2004 11:09:42 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Henke wrote:

> Hey,
> I have to get a good Laptop for my girl friend, but don't know
> what is best.
>
> I know the
> Centrino
> bundel is great, but what about a AMD
> M
+ w-Lan,
> which is better (haven't heard anything about the AMD
> M
)?
>
>
> :?: Which has a better performance? Which runs longer on one
> battery?
>
> :idea: She needs to be very mobile (lite and long
> battery life
).
> it is more important that it is lite rather than big screened.

Okay. There are AMD based notebooks in the thin and light variety.
A smaller screen and larger battery will help with battery life. Would
she be happy with a 12" screen? A 13.3" screen, or does she need a
14" or 15" screen? What types of applications will she run? What is
her budget? Picking a good lightweight notebook involves several
tradeoffs. Perhaps a smaller screen? Perhaps a much higher price,
perhaps lower performance? Tell us more. How long does she need
the battery to last for? How light? How small? How large should the
screen be? What price range? What is most important to her?

>
>
> :arrow: we have about 1300€ to spend.
>
> :?: any tips? what would be a good notebook?
>
> thanks previously for the help :wink:
>
> cas
>
> ==============
> Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 23, 2004 10:37:20 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On 22 Aug 2004 18:15:07 -0400,
Isabell_Henke@web-dot-de.no-spam.invalid (Henke) wrote:

>:idea: She needs to be very mobile (lite and long
>battery life
).
>it is more important that it is lite rather than big screened.

Get her to try out laptops at the shops first to establish what are
major no no first. I played around with a few trying out stuff I
normally do before buying my first and learnt that there's no way I'm
settling for a tiny screen, small keyboards with weird layout and
touchpad.

Things like battery life are more or less consistent for the same
platform, most people I know peg theirs at between 2.5 to 3hrs on a
fresh battery.

>==============
>Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.

Download a proper news reader and post directly to Usenet please.
Maybe you don't get to see all the rubbish that comes with your post
but they are a pain in the ass to read, honest. They come with things
like this

(b:481b24f554>Centrino(/b:481b24f554>
bundel is great, but what about a (i:481b24f554>(b:481b24f554>AMD
M(/b:481b24f554>(/i:481b24f554>

deliberately broke the brackets above to bypass whatever parser they
might be using :p 

--
L.Angel: I'm looking for web design work.
If you need basic to med complexity webpages at affordable rates, email me :) 
Standard HTML, SHTML, MySQL + PHP or ASP, Javascript.
If you really want, FrontPage & DreamWeaver too.
But keep in mind you pay extra bandwidth for their bloated code
Related resources
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 23, 2004 11:27:59 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On 22 Aug 2004 18:15:07 -0400,
Isabell_Henke@web-dot-de.no-spam.invalid (Henke) wrote:
>
>Hey,
>I have to get a good Laptop for my girl friend, but don't know
>what is best.
>
>I know the
>Centrino
>bundel is great, but what about a AMD
>M
+ w-Lan,
>which is better (haven't heard anything about the AMD
>M
)?

WHOA! Get yourself a proper newsreader there buddy! FWIW, just in
case you thought that this is a "help" forum for a specific web page,
your message is actually just being thrown out onto the Usenet
Newsgroup comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips. If you've never heard of
Usenet before you might want to look into it, your ISP probably has an
NNTP server that will let you get to it directly rather than tunneling
through some web portal.

>:?: Which has a better performance? Which runs longer on one
>battery?

Well, the first thing to figure out is just what the heck it is that
the dumb-ass marketing department is actually talking about. There is
no such thing as an "AMD M" processor, just as there is no such thing
as an "Intel M" processor. AMD makes processors, some of them are
sold to the mobile market and some of those even have an 'M' suffix
added to them.

Most likely they are talking about the AMD AthlonXP-M processor. This
is a very respectable processor, coming in with good performance and
power consumption for a VERY reasonable price. The maximum power
consumption of this processor could be either 25W, 45W or 63W,
depending on just what model of processor they used (AMD sells three
different power grades for their mobile processors, the "Low Power",
"Mainstream" and "Desktop Replacement" for the three power grades
respectively). Most likely they use the 45W max chips.


For comparison, Intel's Pentium-M has a maximum power consumption of
25W, only one power grade from Intel. More importantly though, the
Pentium-M probably has slightly lower power consumption at idle.
Generally speaking your processor is actually idle about 99% of the
time for most people, so it's maximum power consumption tends not to
have a huge effect on things. The Pentium-M does very well in this
regard, and that's why it will end up having much better battery life
than the Mobile Pentium4 or the Celeron-M. The AthlonXP-M is also
pretty good here, but maybe not quite as good as the Pentium-M.

>:idea: She needs to be very mobile (lite and long
>battery life
).
>it is more important that it is lite rather than big screened.

Given that long battery life seems to be your top criteria, the
Pentium-M is probably your best choice. For any given price-point the
AthlonXP-M will offer much better performance than the Pentium-M, and
it's a GREAT alternative to any of Intel's Mobile P4 line (good
performance by VERY high power consumption), the Celeron-M (a
Pentium-M that has been intentionally castrated to increase idle power
and reduce battery life) or the Mobile Celeron (avoid these at all
costs! High clock speed but terrible performance combine with high
power consumption make the Mobile Celeron a TERRIBLE choice!)

AMD has a great bang-for-your-buck mobile product on their hands (and
their new Mobile Sempr0n and Athlon64 chips look like they'll continue
that tradition). However if long battery life is your top criteria,
the Pentium-M is top-dog.

The one problem with this recommendation is that you might have a
tough time finding a decent laptop that uses the Pentium-M processor
and that fits into your 1300 euro budget, particularly if you go for a
system with a 3 year warranty (personally I would tend to highly
recommend this, getting out of warranty laptops fixed is EXPENSIVE).
Having a quick look through what Toshiba (usually the lowest cost
manufacturer with decent quality) offers, the best I could do was a
Satellite M30 in pretty much the bare-minimum configuration with a
3-year warranty added on for $1410 US. Given a straight exchange that
would come in under your 1300 euro budget, but I understand that
prices for laptops is are a bit higher on that side of the pond.



Ohh, and a little FWIW for you.. The term "Centrino" is 100%
marketing trash (but INCREDIBLY successful marketing trash at that).
All it means is that the laptop uses a Pentium-M processor, an Intel
chipset and an Intel WiFi chip. If you use all three of those you get
a nice little "Centrino" logo and TONS of money in Intel marketing.

The whole idea behind this marketing campaign was to sell Intel's WiFi
chips despite the fact that they're really not very good (definitely
inferior to what Broadcom or Atheros offer). The Pentium-M processor
and Intel motherboard chipsets are good enough that everyone wanted to
use them, and Intel allocated enough marketing money to make it
basically cheaper for most companies to include an Intel WiFi chip
than to not include one.

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2004 8:18:10 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

>
> Okay. There are AMD based notebooks in the thin and light variety.
> A smaller screen and larger battery will help with battery life.
Would
> she be happy with a 12" screen? A 13.3" screen, or does she need a
> 14" or 15" screen? What types of applications will she run? What is
> her budget? Picking a good lightweight notebook involves several
> tradeoffs. Perhaps a smaller screen? Perhaps a much higher price,
> perhaps lower performance? Tell us more. How long does she need
> the battery to last for? How light? How small? How large should the
> screen be? What price range? What is most important to her?
>
>

screen: we went playing around with some n-books and she wants a
15".
batt.: the batt. should last min 4hrs.
applications: mostly presentations and office stuff (power point,
exel etc.), some autocad
(only very basic).
invest: now there are 1500€ available for her.
preffs.: not over 3kg, batt min 4hrs, 15", 1500€, quiet (non or
little fan use), min HDD 40GB
main preffs.: quiet, batt, <3kg

thx so far
cas

==============
Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2004 8:18:24 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

> Tony Hillwrote:
On 22 Aug 2004 18:15:07 -0400,
>
> I know the
> Centrino
> bundel is great, but what about a AMD
> M
+
w-Lan,
> which is better (haven't heard anything about the AMD
> M
)?
>
> WHOA! Get yourself a proper newsreader there buddy! FWIW, just in
> case you thought that this is a "help" forum for a specific web
page,
> your message is actually just being thrown out onto the Usenet
> Newsgroup comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips. If you've never heard of
> Usenet before you might want to look into it, your ISP probably has
an
> NNTP server that will let you get to it directly rather than
tunneling
> through some web portal.

thx for that, and sorry for all those brakets ;-)
i will try the Usenet
Newsgroup comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips.



> :?: Which has a better performance? Which runs longer on one
> battery?
>
> Well, the first thing to figure out is just what the heck it is
that
> the dumb-*** marketing department is actually talking about. There
is
> no such thing as an "AMD M" processor, just as there is no such
thing
> as an "Intel M" processor. AMD makes processors, some of them are
> sold to the mobile market and some of those even have an 'M' suffix
> added to them.
>
>
>
> Most likely they are talking about the AMD AthlonXP-M processor.
This
> is a very respectable processor, coming in with good performance
and
> power consumption for a VERY reasonable price. The maximum power
> consumption of this processor could be either 25W, 45W or 63W,
> depending on just what model of processor they used (AMD sells
three
> different power grades for their mobile processors, the "Low
Power",
> "Mainstream" and "Desktop Replacement" for the three power grades
> respectively). Most likely they use the 45W max chips.
>
>
> For comparison, Intel's Pentium-M has a maximum power consumption
of
> 25W, only one power grade from Intel. More importantly though, the
> Pentium-M probably has slightly lower power consumption at idle.
> Generally speaking your processor is actually idle about 99% of the
> time for most people, so it's maximum power consumption tends not
to
> have a huge effect on things. The Pentium-M does very well in this
> regard, and that's why it will end up having much better battery
life
> than the Mobile Pentium4 or the Celeron-M. The AthlonXP-M is also
> pretty good here, but maybe not quite as good as the Pentium-M.
>
>
> :idea: She needs to be very mobile (long battery life).
>
> Given that long battery life seems to be your top criteria, the
> Pentium-M is probably your best choice. For any given price-point
the
> AthlonXP-M will offer much better performance than the Pentium-M,
and
> it's a GREAT alternative to any of Intel's Mobile P4 line (good
> performance by VERY high power consumption), the Celeron-M (a
> Pentium-M that has been intentionally castrated to increase idle
power
> and reduce battery life) or the Mobile Celeron (avoid these at all
> costs! High clock speed but terrible performance combine with high
> power consumption make the Mobile Celeron a TERRIBLE choice!)
>
> AMD has a great bang-for-your-buck mobile product on their hands
(and
> their new Mobile Sempr0n and Athlon64 chips look like they'll
continue
> that tradition). However if long battery life is your top
criteria,
> the Pentium-M is top-dog.
>
> The one problem with this recommendation is that you might have a
> tough time finding a decent laptop that uses the Pentium-M
processor
> and that fits into your 1300 euro budget, particularly if you go for
a
> system with a 3 year warranty (personally I would tend to highly
> recommend this, getting out of warranty laptops fixed is
EXPENSIVE).
> Having a quick look through what Toshiba (usually the lowest cost
> manufacturer with decent quality) offers, the best I could do was a
> Satellite M30 in pretty much the bare-minimum configuration with a
> 3-year warranty added on for $1410 US. Given a straight exchange
that
> would come in under your 1300 euro budget, but I understand that
> prices for laptops is are a bit higher on that side of the pond.
>
>
>
> Ohh, and a little FWIW for you.. The term "Centrino" is 100%
> marketing trash (but INCREDIBLY successful marketing trash at
that).
> All it means is that the laptop uses a Pentium-M processor, an
Intel
> chipset and an Intel WiFi chip. If you use all three of those you
get
> a nice little "Centrino" logo and TONS of money in Intel marketing.
>
> The whole idea behind this marketing campaign was to sell Intel's
WiFi
> chips despite the fact that they're really not very good
(definitely
> inferior to what Broadcom or Atheros offer). The Pentium-M
processor
> and Intel motherboard chipsets are good enough that everyone wanted
to
> use them, and Intel allocated enough marketing money to make it
> basically cheaper for most companies to include an Intel WiFi chip
> than to not include one.
>

so u say the AthlonXP-M is almost as good as the Pentium-M? that
would cut the cost a little ;-) but it needs to run min 4hrs.

i didn't know centrino would mean an intel WiFi-chip.
do u know a n-book with one of those good WiFi-chips?


thx so far, was a very great help, now we know more and can look a
little more speciffic

cas

==============
Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2004 8:18:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

> Tony Hillwrote:
On 22 Aug 2004 18:15:07 -0400,
>
> I know the
> Centrino
> bundel is great, but what about a AMD
> M
+
w-Lan,
> which is better (haven't heard anything about the AMD
> M
)?
>
> WHOA! Get yourself a proper newsreader there buddy! FWIW, just in
> case you thought that this is a "help" forum for a specific web
page,
> your message is actually just being thrown out onto the Usenet
> Newsgroup comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips. If you've never heard of
> Usenet before you might want to look into it, your ISP probably has
an
> NNTP server that will let you get to it directly rather than
tunneling
> through some web portal.

thx for that, and sorry for all those brakets ;-)
i will try the Usenet
Newsgroup comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips.



> :?: Which has a better performance? Which runs longer on one
> battery?
>
> Well, the first thing to figure out is just what the heck it is
that
> the dumb-*** marketing department is actually talking about. There
is
> no such thing as an "AMD M" processor, just as there is no such
thing
> as an "Intel M" processor. AMD makes processors, some of them are
> sold to the mobile market and some of those even have an 'M' suffix
> added to them.
>
>
>
> Most likely they are talking about the AMD AthlonXP-M processor.
This
> is a very respectable processor, coming in with good performance
and
> power consumption for a VERY reasonable price. The maximum power
> consumption of this processor could be either 25W, 45W or 63W,
> depending on just what model of processor they used (AMD sells
three
> different power grades for their mobile processors, the "Low
Power",
> "Mainstream" and "Desktop Replacement" for the three power grades
> respectively). Most likely they use the 45W max chips.
>
>
> For comparison, Intel's Pentium-M has a maximum power consumption
of
> 25W, only one power grade from Intel. More importantly though, the
> Pentium-M probably has slightly lower power consumption at idle.
> Generally speaking your processor is actually idle about 99% of the
> time for most people, so it's maximum power consumption tends not
to
> have a huge effect on things. The Pentium-M does very well in this
> regard, and that's why it will end up having much better battery
life
> than the Mobile Pentium4 or the Celeron-M. The AthlonXP-M is also
> pretty good here, but maybe not quite as good as the Pentium-M.
>
>
> :idea: She needs to be very mobile (long battery life).
>
> Given that long battery life seems to be your top criteria, the
> Pentium-M is probably your best choice. For any given price-point
the
> AthlonXP-M will offer much better performance than the Pentium-M,
and
> it's a GREAT alternative to any of Intel's Mobile P4 line (good
> performance by VERY high power consumption), the Celeron-M (a
> Pentium-M that has been intentionally castrated to increase idle
power
> and reduce battery life) or the Mobile Celeron (avoid these at all
> costs! High clock speed but terrible performance combine with high
> power consumption make the Mobile Celeron a TERRIBLE choice!)
>
> AMD has a great bang-for-your-buck mobile product on their hands
(and
> their new Mobile Sempr0n and Athlon64 chips look like they'll
continue
> that tradition). However if long battery life is your top
criteria,
> the Pentium-M is top-dog.
>
> The one problem with this recommendation is that you might have a
> tough time finding a decent laptop that uses the Pentium-M
processor
> and that fits into your 1300 euro budget, particularly if you go for
a
> system with a 3 year warranty (personally I would tend to highly
> recommend this, getting out of warranty laptops fixed is
EXPENSIVE).
> Having a quick look through what Toshiba (usually the lowest cost
> manufacturer with decent quality) offers, the best I could do was a
> Satellite M30 in pretty much the bare-minimum configuration with a
> 3-year warranty added on for $1410 US. Given a straight exchange
that
> would come in under your 1300 euro budget, but I understand that
> prices for laptops is are a bit higher on that side of the pond.
>
>
>
> Ohh, and a little FWIW for you.. The term "Centrino" is 100%
> marketing trash (but INCREDIBLY successful marketing trash at
that).
> All it means is that the laptop uses a Pentium-M processor, an
Intel
> chipset and an Intel WiFi chip. If you use all three of those you
get
> a nice little "Centrino" logo and TONS of money in Intel marketing.
>
> The whole idea behind this marketing campaign was to sell Intel's
WiFi
> chips despite the fact that they're really not very good
(definitely
> inferior to what Broadcom or Atheros offer). The Pentium-M
processor
> and Intel motherboard chipsets are good enough that everyone wanted
to
> use them, and Intel allocated enough marketing money to make it
> basically cheaper for most companies to include an Intel WiFi chip
> than to not include one.
>

so u say the AthlonXP-M is almost as good as the Pentium-M? that
would cut the cost a little ;-) but it needs to run min 4hrs.

i didn't know centrino would mean an intel WiFi-chip.
do u know a n-book with one of those good WiFi-chips?


thx so far, was a very great help, now we know more and can look a
little more speciffic

cas

==============
Posted through www.HowToFixComputers.com/bb - free access to hardware troubleshooting newsgroups.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 25, 2004 10:08:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Henke wrote:
> so u say the AthlonXP-M is almost as good as the Pentium-M? that
> would cut the cost a little ;-) but it needs to run min 4hrs.

The ones with the 4 hour battery lives are usually the ones with two
batteries on them. This makes them heavy.

> i didn't know centrino would mean an intel WiFi-chip.
> do u know a n-book with one of those good WiFi-chips?

Most modern notebooks (other than bargain basement notebooks) offer some
kind of WiFi built-in either standard or as an option. They don't have to be
the Intel WiFi chipset for it to work. Although Intel seems to be the first
one that supports tri-mode WiFi, meaning they support 802.11b, 802.11g,
*and* 802.11a. There are very few people who use the 802.11a WiFi, but it's
a nice feature to have just in case you come across such a network in your
lifetime.

Yousuf Khan
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 26, 2004 10:25:08 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On 25 Aug 2004 04:18:24 -0400,
Isabell_Henke@web-dot-de.no-spam.invalid (Henke) wrote:
>so u say the AthlonXP-M is almost as good as the Pentium-M? that
>would cut the cost a little ;-) but it needs to run min 4hrs.

Basically yes. Battery life is more a function of the size of the
battery, the screen, hard drive, etc. It's entirely possible to build
a notebook using an AthlonXP-M "Low Power" chip that will last 4+
hours.

Of course, the big problem is that damn near nobody is building decent
notebooks using the AthlonXP-M processor, and those that do are almost
certainly using the "Mainstream" or "Desktop Replacement" versions of
the AthlonXP as those are cheaper processors.

In the end, most of the best laptops I've come across to fit your bill
do use Intel's Pentium-M processor. AMD's decent processor is
suffering the fate of many non-Intel chips before it, a decent
processor being saddled with really low-end trash equipment in order
to hit a price point.

Given your previously mentioned requirements of > 3kg, 4+ hour battery
life and quiet, probably the notebook I would chose would be either
the Toshiba Satellite A55 or IBM's ThinkPad R series. Both should be
configurable within your price range.

>i didn't know centrino would mean an intel WiFi-chip.
>do u know a n-book with one of those good WiFi-chips?

Some have the available as an extra component in addition to the
built-in Intel WiFi chip, but it's probably not worthwhile here. As
mentioned previous, Intel's Centrino marketing campaign was VERY
successful, basically all Pentium-M notebooks have an Intel WiFi chip
included. They aren't quite so bad now that they at least support
802.11g (54Mb/s), previous versions of the chip only support 802.11b
(11Mb/s).

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
August 26, 2004 12:50:57 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Tony Hill wrote:

> On 25 Aug 2004 04:18:24 -0400,
> Isabell_Henke@web-dot-de.no-spam.invalid (Henke) wrote:
> >so u say the AthlonXP-M is almost as good as the Pentium-M? that
> >would cut the cost a little ;-) but it needs to run min 4hrs.
>
> Basically yes. Battery life is more a function of the size of the
> battery, the screen, hard drive, etc. It's entirely possible to build
> a notebook using an AthlonXP-M "Low Power" chip that will last 4+
> hours.
>
> Of course, the big problem is that damn near nobody is building decent
> notebooks using the AthlonXP-M processor, and those that do are almost
> certainly using the "Mainstream" or "Desktop Replacement" versions of
> the AthlonXP as those are cheaper processors.

That is not true. There are some nice thin and light Athlon XP notebooks
by Fujitsu for example. You probably won't find them at local Best Buy or
Circuit City though.

>
>
> In the end, most of the best laptops I've come across to fit your bill
> do use Intel's Pentium-M processor.

In another couple of months thin and light notebooks with Athlon 64
will appear. AMD started shipping chips for those recently.

> AMD's decent processor is
> suffering the fate of many non-Intel chips before it, a decent
> processor being saddled with really low-end trash equipment in order
> to hit a price point.

That might be true for the $600- $800 notebooks, however there are some
nice AMD based notebooks in the $1100+ category.

>
>
> Given your previously mentioned requirements of > 3kg, 4+ hour battery
> life and quiet, probably the notebook I would chose would be either
> the Toshiba Satellite A55 or IBM's ThinkPad R series. Both should be
> configurable within your price range.
>
> >i didn't know centrino would mean an intel WiFi-chip.
> >do u know a n-book with one of those good WiFi-chips?
>
> Some have the available as an extra component in addition to the
> built-in Intel WiFi chip, but it's probably not worthwhile here. As
> mentioned previous, Intel's Centrino marketing campaign was VERY
> successful, basically all Pentium-M notebooks have an Intel WiFi chip
> included. They aren't quite so bad now that they at least support
> 802.11g (54Mb/s), previous versions of the chip only support 802.11b
> (11Mb/s).
>
> -------------
> Tony Hill
> hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 27, 2004 4:02:31 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

JK wrote:
> Tony Hill wrote:
>> Of course, the big problem is that damn near nobody is building
>> decent notebooks using the AthlonXP-M processor, and those that do
>> are almost certainly using the "Mainstream" or "Desktop Replacement"
>> versions of the AthlonXP as those are cheaper processors.
>
> That is not true. There are some nice thin and light Athlon XP
> notebooks by Fujitsu for example. You probably won't find them at
> local Best Buy or Circuit City though.

Something you will find in a Best Buy or a Futureshop (up here in Canada)
are Averatec laptops:

http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=mozclient&ie=utf-8...

Extremely thin and light notebooks. Too light as a matter of fact, because
it's battery probably wouldn't last 4+ hours (maybe 3 hours at the most).
But that's a general issue with all ultralight notebooks.

Yousuf Khan
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
August 27, 2004 7:25:34 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 08:50:57 -0400, JK <JK9821@netscape.net> wrote:
>Tony Hill wrote:
>> Of course, the big problem is that damn near nobody is building decent
>> notebooks using the AthlonXP-M processor, and those that do are almost
>> certainly using the "Mainstream" or "Desktop Replacement" versions of
>> the AthlonXP as those are cheaper processors.
>
>That is not true. There are some nice thin and light Athlon XP notebooks
>by Fujitsu for example. You probably won't find them at local Best Buy or
>Circuit City though.

Fujitsu's LifeBook S2000 is basically the only notebook I know of that
uses the Low Power AthlonXP-M. Not a bad system, though only a 13.3"
screen. Even then though Fujitsu claims 33% longer battery life on
their near-identical Pentium-M based LifeBook S6000.

>> In the end, most of the best laptops I've come across to fit your bill
>> do use Intel's Pentium-M processor.
>
>In another couple of months thin and light notebooks with Athlon 64
>will appear. AMD started shipping chips for those recently.

At 35W max power and higher typical power than the Pentium-M... and
just how much is 64-bit processing going to gain for someone mainly
interested in long battery life for basic office applications?

-------------
Tony Hill
hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 13, 2004 12:03:12 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Thanks to all of u.


u all were a real help.
cas

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