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Tried to replace a pentium ii slot 1 with pentium iii slot..

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Anonymous
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September 2, 2004 4:43:36 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Trying to get some more life out of an old system.
Thought I could swap out the older Pentium II 350MHz
FSB 100MHz with a Pentium III 650 FSB 100. Both
slot 1. Either I have a dead Pentium III or there is
something more to it. The machine does not boot
at all, no video, though I hear the usual noises and
blinking LEDs from the hard drives and DC rom drives.
Please go easy on me, I'm a newbie to pentium based
machines....

The machine is an HP Pavillion
8370. I upgraded the hard drive last year, so that
should last a while longer.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 2, 2004 4:43:37 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

I don't really know.

I see that it's a 440BX system, so it ought to be capable of using a PIII.

(Some early 440BX boards, like the original Intel SE440BX "Seattle", were
limited in the speed of CPUs they supported due to electrical limitations.
However, a PIII 650 is a Coppermine CPU, which may draw less power than a
PIII 450.)

Here's one semi-random suggestion: there's a BIOS update available:

http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericSoftwareDownl...

(link may wrap). If your BIOS version is older than this one (1.09, 10 Dec.
1998), it may be worth a go. Bear in mind that a failed BIOS flash can
render the machine unable to boot. (That's a standard disclaimer; I've been
spared that for all of the updates I've done over the past 9 years.)

Best of luck.

Bob Knowlden

Address may be scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.

"Robert Casey" <wa2ise@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:41366CB6.1030609@ix.netcom.com...
> Trying to get some more life out of an old system.
> Thought I could swap out the older Pentium II 350MHz
> FSB 100MHz with a Pentium III 650 FSB 100. Both
> slot 1. Either I have a dead Pentium III or there is
> something more to it. The machine does not boot
> at all, no video, though I hear the usual noises and
> blinking LEDs from the hard drives and DC rom drives.
> Please go easy on me, I'm a newbie to pentium based
> machines....
>
> The machine is an HP Pavillion
> 8370. I upgraded the hard drive last year, so that
> should last a while longer.
>
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 2, 2004 9:23:29 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Bob Knowlden wrote:
> I don't really know.
>
> I see that it's a 440BX system, so it ought to be capable of using a PIII.
>
> (Some early 440BX boards, like the original Intel SE440BX "Seattle", were
> limited in the speed of CPUs they supported due to electrical limitations.
> However, a PIII 650 is a Coppermine CPU, which may draw less power than a
> PIII 450.)
>
> Here's one semi-random suggestion: there's a BIOS update available:
>
> http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericSoftwareDownl...
>
> (link may wrap). If your BIOS version is older than this one (1.09, 10 Dec.
> 1998), it may be worth a go. Bear in mind that a failed BIOS flash can
> render the machine unable to boot. (That's a standard disclaimer; I've been
> spared that for all of the updates I've done over the past 9 years.)
>
> Best of luck.
>
> Bob Knowlden
>

Thanks, but when I try to run the self extracting bios flasher, I get an
error message saying that my system has restrictions that forbid running
it. This isn't a PC in some company with IT guys, it's a home system.
Now I gotta figure out how to undo the restrictions. Windows help
doesn't tell me anything.

This machine has version 1.08, so if I could run the extractor program
to make a self bootable flasher floppy, I could flash to 1.09
Related resources
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 2, 2004 8:51:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Your board may not support the lower voltages that the
Coppermine-based P3 requires since some of the first BX boards made in
1998-early 1999 only supplied voltage down to 1.8v. That board would
likely support Katmai-based P3s though. Katmai-based P3 range from
450 up to 600Mhz, while Coppermine P3s go all the way to 1GHz. If
your wish to have a Coppermine on that board, or even a Tualatin-based
P3/Celeron, you will need a slocket adaptor with its own voltage
regulator for the CPU, such as the PL-iP3/T from Powerleap
http://www.powerleap.com/



> The machine is an HP Pavillion
>8370. I upgraded the hard drive last year, so that
>should last a while longer.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 2, 2004 9:27:41 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Robert Casey wrote:
>
> Bob Knowlden wrote:
> > I don't really know.
> >
> > I see that it's a 440BX system, so it ought to be capable of using a PIII.
> >
> > (Some early 440BX boards, like the original Intel SE440BX "Seattle", were
> > limited in the speed of CPUs they supported due to electrical limitations.
> > However, a PIII 650 is a Coppermine CPU, which may draw less power than a
> > PIII 450.)
> >
> > Here's one semi-random suggestion: there's a BIOS update available:
> >
> > http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/genericSoftwareDownl...
> >
> > (link may wrap). If your BIOS version is older than this one (1.09, 10 Dec.
> > 1998), it may be worth a go. Bear in mind that a failed BIOS flash can
> > render the machine unable to boot. (That's a standard disclaimer; I've been
> > spared that for all of the updates I've done over the past 9 years.)
> >
> > Best of luck.
> >
> > Bob Knowlden
> >
>
> Thanks, but when I try to run the self extracting bios flasher, I get an
> error message saying that my system has restrictions that forbid running
> it. This isn't a PC in some company with IT guys, it's a home system.
> Now I gotta figure out how to undo the restrictions. Windows help
> doesn't tell me anything.
>
> This machine has version 1.08, so if I could run the extractor program
> to make a self bootable flasher floppy, I could flash to 1.09

The Pentium II 350 MHz runs at 2.0 Volt. The Pentium III 650 MHz slot1 runs
at either 1.65V or 1.7V depending on version.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 3, 2004 12:30:01 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

>
>
> The Pentium II 350 MHz runs at 2.0 Volt. The Pentium III 650 MHz slot1 runs
> at either 1.65V or 1.7V depending on version.

Which means that I may have blown it up? I had thought that there
was a power voltage regulator inside the slot 1 module. The
computer works fine with the original Pentium II back in place, so
I didn't blow up the mobo. So is that Pentium III likely to be
history (if so it was only $40 anyway) or is there something else
I need to look at? Newbie status showing quite well here :-)
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 4, 2004 12:41:39 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Robert Casey wrote:
>
> >
> >
> > The Pentium II 350 MHz runs at 2.0 Volt. The Pentium III 650 MHz slot1 runs
> > at either 1.65V or 1.7V depending on version.
>
> Which means that I may have blown it up? I had thought that there
> was a power voltage regulator inside the slot 1 module. The
> computer works fine with the original Pentium II back in place, so
> I didn't blow up the mobo. So is that Pentium III likely to be
> history (if so it was only $40 anyway) or is there something else
> I need to look at? Newbie status showing quite well here :-)

We, are all newbies with things we haven't tried before. I haven't build
PII/PIII systems, but look up info in the excellent hardware bible of
Scott Mueller. Accordingly, there are no jumpers, the voltages are
automatically handled through pins in the processor cartridge, so you
can wipe the sweat off your face. However, you might need a BIOS upgrade.
Anonymous
a b à CPUs
September 5, 2004 6:34:18 AM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

Johannes H Andersen wrote:
>

>
>
> We, are all newbies with things we haven't tried before. I haven't build
> PII/PIII systems, but look up info in the excellent hardware bible of
> Scott Mueller. Accordingly, there are no jumpers, the voltages are
> automatically handled through pins in the processor cartridge, so you
> can wipe the sweat off your face. However, you might need a BIOS upgrade.

Thanks. Anyway it seems that I could do a BOIS upgrade. I have
version 1.08, and there is a version 1.09 I downloaded from the HP
web site. Problem is that it's in a self extracting file that
Windows says I don't have "permission" to run? "See your system
administrator". Guess Bill wanted to protect us from ourselves..?
Anyway that's the next item to figure out, how to get windows
to give me "permission". Of course I don't know if this upgrade
will do any good or not.
September 5, 2004 4:29:00 PM

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 02:34:18 GMT, Robert Casey <wa2ise@ix.netcom.com>
wrote:

>Johannes H Andersen wrote:
>>
>
>>
>>
>> We, are all newbies with things we haven't tried before. I haven't build
>> PII/PIII systems, but look up info in the excellent hardware bible of
>> Scott Mueller. Accordingly, there are no jumpers, the voltages are
>> automatically handled through pins in the processor cartridge, so you
>> can wipe the sweat off your face. However, you might need a BIOS upgrade.
>
>Thanks. Anyway it seems that I could do a BOIS upgrade. I have
>version 1.08, and there is a version 1.09 I downloaded from the HP
>web site. Problem is that it's in a self extracting file that
>Windows says I don't have "permission" to run? "See your system
>administrator". Guess Bill wanted to protect us from ourselves..?
>Anyway that's the next item to figure out, how to get windows
>to give me "permission". Of course I don't know if this upgrade
>will do any good or not.


try, right click on file, select run as administrator?
!