Recommendation for an inexpensive Processor/MotherBoard/Me..

Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.systems (More info?)

I would like to know some opinions about a good and cheap combination
for processor/motherboard/memory. I do not play games but I may need
to use a heavy IDE like Microsoft Visual Studio .NET so I am thinking
in 1024RAM. I also need a firerwire port.

Also, I have a Matrox Millenium G450 video card (3 years old I guess).
I really like its 2D image quality. But, should I replace it?

Thanks a lot for your attention and any possible help

Joao
5 answers Last reply
More about recommendation inexpensive processor motherboard
  1. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.systems (More info?)

    On 5 Dec 2004 10:13:47 -0800, jpmprb@sapo.pt (Joao Barros) wrote:

    >I would like to know some opinions about a good and cheap combination
    >for processor/motherboard/memory. I do not play games but I may need
    >to use a heavy IDE like Microsoft Visual Studio .NET so I am thinking
    >in 1024RAM. I also need a firerwire port.

    Well, for compiling AMD processors are pretty much universally offer
    much better bang for your buck than Intel chips (the P4 design core
    just isn't that well suited to compiling), it's just a question then
    of how much of a budget you're really on.

    If you're looking at the real low-cost side of things, AMD's AthlonXP
    or Sempron chips are probably going to be your best bet. For the
    super-cheap you could pick up something like a Sempron 2400+ ($63) and
    a Chaintech 7NJL6 ($48.50) for just over a hundred bucks (all prices
    care of www.newegg.com, availability and pricing may differ in your
    neck of the woods of course). This is the exact setup I've got
    running on my system, and while the performance isn't quite up there
    with the latest and greatest, the price is really tough to beat. This
    setup would use dual-channel memory, so you would want 2 x 512MB. You
    would need to add in a firewire card, but those can be found for $10.

    If you're looking for a somewhat higher-end setup but still for a good
    price, I'd suggest jumping up to an Athlon64. While you could grab a
    slightly faster Sempron or AthlonXP chip for not much more money, the
    performance gains are going to be relatively small. An entry level
    Athlon64 system might consist of something like a socket 754 Athlon64
    3000+ ($147.50) and an MSI K8N Neo Platinum ($99.50). This board has
    firewire built in and takes single-channel memory.

    Note that AMD's gradually moving away from the socket 754 Athlon64
    chips, and while the Socket 939 chips seem to benefit games and
    especially graphical workstation apps a lot, they won't get you much
    in Visual Studio, so you can get some pretty good deals on the older
    Socket 754 chips.

    >Also, I have a Matrox Millenium G450 video card (3 years old I guess).
    >I really like its 2D image quality. But, should I replace it?

    No good reason to replace that card, for what you're looking to do
    there is not really anything better out there now.

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
  2. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.systems (More info?)

    On 5 Dec 2004 10:13:47 -0800, jpmprb@sapo.pt (Joao Barros) wrote:

    >I would like to know some opinions about a good and cheap combination
    >for processor/motherboard/memory. I do not play games but I may need
    >to use a heavy IDE like Microsoft Visual Studio .NET so I am thinking
    >in 1024RAM. I also need a firerwire port.

    Do you already have a power supply and case suitable for a current
    mbrd/CPU? That would be a case with preferably a rear exhaust fan and a
    ATX12V power supply with a square 4-pin 12V connector.

    I can't add much to what Tony has said but if you can stretch it I'd go for
    an Athlon64. MSI has some nice mbrds at decent prices.

    Rgds, George Macdonald

    "Just because they're paranoid doesn't mean you're not psychotic" - Who, me??
  3. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.systems (More info?)

    On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 14:43:00 -0500, Tony Hill
    <hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote:
    >...snip...
    >Note that AMD's gradually moving away from the socket 754 Athlon64
    >chips, and while the Socket 939 chips seem to benefit games and
    >especially graphical workstation apps a lot, they won't get you much
    >in Visual Studio, so you can get some pretty good deals on the older
    >Socket 754 chips.
    Except for one thing - upgradeability. While 754 will be in the
    nearest future limited to Semprons - 32 bit only, with 939 you have a
    hope to plug in the next generation dual core A64. If you are the
    type of upgrader, get 939. If you prefer getting a whole new system
    every while, you are better off with 754.
    >
    >>Also, I have a Matrox Millenium G450 video card (3 years old I guess).
    >>I really like its 2D image quality. But, should I replace it?
    >
    >No good reason to replace that card, for what you're looking to do
    >there is not really anything better out there now.
    >
    >-------------
    >Tony Hill
    >hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
  4. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips, comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.systems (More info?)

    Thanks a lot to all who responded!
    All answers (especially the one from Tony Hill) were really useful to
    me. I decided that I will buy the Athlon64 3200+ and the MSI K8N Neo
    Platinum motherboard.

    Joao


    Tony Hill wrote:
    > On 5 Dec 2004 10:13:47 -0800, jpmprb@sapo.pt (Joao Barros) wrote:
    >
    > >I would like to know some opinions about a good and cheap
    combination
    > >for processor/motherboard/memory. I do not play games but I may need
    > >to use a heavy IDE like Microsoft Visual Studio .NET so I am
    thinking
    > >in 1024RAM. I also need a firerwire port.
    >
    > Well, for compiling AMD processors are pretty much universally offer
    > much better bang for your buck than Intel chips (the P4 design core
    > just isn't that well suited to compiling), it's just a question then
    > of how much of a budget you're really on.
    >
    > If you're looking at the real low-cost side of things, AMD's AthlonXP
    > or Sempron chips are probably going to be your best bet. For the
    > super-cheap you could pick up something like a Sempron 2400+ ($63)
    and
    > a Chaintech 7NJL6 ($48.50) for just over a hundred bucks (all prices
    > care of www.newegg.com, availability and pricing may differ in your
    > neck of the woods of course). This is the exact setup I've got
    > running on my system, and while the performance isn't quite up there
    > with the latest and greatest, the price is really tough to beat.
    This
    > setup would use dual-channel memory, so you would want 2 x 512MB.
    You
    > would need to add in a firewire card, but those can be found for $10.
    >
    > If you're looking for a somewhat higher-end setup but still for a
    good
    > price, I'd suggest jumping up to an Athlon64. While you could grab a
    > slightly faster Sempron or AthlonXP chip for not much more money, the
    > performance gains are going to be relatively small. An entry level
    > Athlon64 system might consist of something like a socket 754 Athlon64
    > 3000+ ($147.50) and an MSI K8N Neo Platinum ($99.50). This board has
    > firewire built in and takes single-channel memory.
    >
    > Note that AMD's gradually moving away from the socket 754 Athlon64
    > chips, and while the Socket 939 chips seem to benefit games and
    > especially graphical workstation apps a lot, they won't get you much
    > in Visual Studio, so you can get some pretty good deals on the older
    > Socket 754 chips.
    >
    > >Also, I have a Matrox Millenium G450 video card (3 years old I
    guess).
    > >I really like its 2D image quality. But, should I replace it?
    >
    > No good reason to replace that card, for what you're looking to do
    > there is not really anything better out there now.
    >
    > -------------
    > Tony Hill
    > hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
  5. Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.systems (More info?)

    On Mon, 06 Dec 2004 02:37:34 GMT, "nobody@nowhere.net"
    <mygarbage2000@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >On Sun, 05 Dec 2004 14:43:00 -0500, Tony Hill
    ><hilla_nospam_20@yahoo.ca> wrote:
    >>...snip...
    >>Note that AMD's gradually moving away from the socket 754 Athlon64
    >>chips, and while the Socket 939 chips seem to benefit games and
    >>especially graphical workstation apps a lot, they won't get you much
    >>in Visual Studio, so you can get some pretty good deals on the older
    >>Socket 754 chips.
    >Except for one thing - upgradeability. While 754 will be in the
    >nearest future limited to Semprons - 32 bit only, with 939 you have a
    >hope to plug in the next generation dual core A64. If you are the
    >type of upgrader, get 939. If you prefer getting a whole new system
    >every while, you are better off with 754.

    I *KNEW* someone was going to say that :>

    I actually almost wrote in the original message "Just ignore all the
    people telling you not to buy socket 754 due to lack of upgradability,
    because it's a dumb argument".

    Honestly, I can pretty much assure you that more than ~1 year down the
    road there will not be ANY new processors that will work in today's
    Socket 939 boards. Even if they still use Socket 939, your current
    board almost certainly won't handle them. Just look at what we had
    with Socket A. I bought a board at the start of 2002, and by early to
    mind 2003 AMD had stopped producing new chips that would work on a
    266MT/s bus speed. Sure, their new AthlonXP chips were still socket
    A, but they wouldn't work in my board.

    Beyond bus speed there are also many other factors such as the voltage
    regulator and memory interface that may affect upgradability. The
    simple fact of the matter is that unless you upgrade your CPU every 6
    months or so, you will end up being disappointed in terms of
    upgradability in PCs.

    Buy for today and put the money you save in the bank, you'll come out
    ahead in the long run.

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
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