Sony Playstation 3 play

Archived from groups: misc.invest.stocks,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

First, what is Rambus XDR DRAM? There are speculations claiming Playstation
3 will use NVIDIA's NV50 GPU and Rambus' XDR DRAM. This morning the rumor
caused RMBS stock price jumped almost two dollars a share in the pre-market.
I have short positions on Rambus. This month, I added more shorts when it
went as high as $27.50. But right now I can't quite digest this news. Don't
know if I should cover or add more shorts? Any opinion is appreciated.
Thanks.
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  1. Archived from groups: misc.invest.stocks,comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

    On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 13:47:04 GMT, "Ar Q" <ArthurQ283@hottmail.com>
    wrote:


    What the heck was that popping sound I just heard?!? Sounded like
    someone just opened up a can of worms?! :>

    >First, what is Rambus XDR DRAM?

    XDR is the next generation of Rambus memory, the follow-up to the
    DRDRAM used fairly successfully in the Playstation2 and much less
    successfully in a very small number of PCs (computer memory focuses
    much more on low latency, where RDRAM and this new XDR memory are
    likely to due somewhat poorly at, while consoles and video cards focus
    mainly on bandwidth, which is Rambus' main thrust).

    XDR is a serial, point-to-point bus for memory that runs at 400MHz and
    8x data rate for 3.2GT/s (you'll often see it labeled as "3.2GHz",
    close enough for the marketing dept). It is 16-bits wide using
    differential signaling (two pins per bit). Total bandwidth works out
    to 6.4GB/s using 32-pins for data, giving it rather high bandwidth per
    pin.

    > There are speculations claiming Playstation
    >3 will use NVIDIA's NV50 GPU and Rambus' XDR DRAM. This morning the rumor
    >caused RMBS stock price jumped almost two dollars a share in the pre-market.

    Why am I not surprised? There are ALWAYS rumors about Rambus, both
    good and bad, that cause the stock to go all over the place. In the
    end though, little comes of it.

    If I were you I REALLY wouldn't hold my breath for the PS3 to use
    Rambus memory. Sure, it might happen, the PS2 does use Rambus memory
    now, but nVidia has NEVER designed anything using RDRAM and has been
    rather vocal about saying that it's not a good solution.

    nVidia definitely IS working with Sony to make the GPU for the PS3,
    though whether it will be the NV50 or some other chip is somewhat up
    in the air. As you may have already heard, Sony, Toshiba and IBM are
    all working on the main processor for the PS3, code-named "Cell", that
    is supposed to be rather revolutionary. It's somewhat unknown just
    how the memory subsystem will interface with these two chips.
    Traditionally one of the big differences between a gaming console and
    a standard computer is that the memory tends to be more tightly
    associated with the GPU in a gaming console and the CPU in a general
    purpose computer, though there are many exceptions to this rule.


    Note that nVidia's latest and greatest GPUs for PCs have over 20GB/s
    of memory bandwidth using GDDR3 memory. Achieving the sort of
    bandwidth that Rambus likes to flash around is not really a difficult
    task, it's just a matter of the cheapest and most effective way to get
    that bandwidth.

    One thing to keep in mind: GDDR memory is widely used and readily
    available today. To the best of my knowledge there is NO ONE that is
    making XDR memory.

    >I have short positions on Rambus. This month, I added more shorts when it
    >went as high as $27.50. But right now I can't quite digest this news. Don't
    >know if I should cover or add more shorts? Any opinion is appreciated.

    Rambus is always going to be a *HIGH* risk stock. There are always
    people floating around rumors, most of which have absolutely no basis
    on fact. This stock is one of the ones that is based entirely off of
    those rumors and has basically NOTHING to do with the actual
    performance of the company.

    Note that one thing is for certain, Rambus has kind of dug their own
    grave as far as mainstream memory technology goes. They tried to sue
    basically every memory manufacturer on the planet, and considering
    that Rambus doesn't actually make anything, those memory manufacturers
    are their ONLY customers. Suing (or at least threatening lawsuits)
    against virtually every one of your customers is never a very good
    idea, especially when the basis of that lawsuit might have been
    fraudulent (original court ruling said that Rambus had committed
    fraud, but that was later overturned in appeal where the judge decided
    the Rambus folk were merely scumbags but not fraudsters).

    -------------
    Tony Hill
    hilla <underscore> 20 <at> yahoo <dot> ca
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